Andrew Shaw has experience of both sides of the camera. After debuting as a television host (becoming well known as presenter of youth show, Hey Hey It's Andy) he has spent time as producer, director, and more recently as a television executive responsible for commissioning and buying programmes (for both TVNZ and Prime TV). 

There’s a hundred audiences, and the same audience is happy today, sad tomorrow, looking for drama one day, wanting to answer the puzzle on Wheel of Fortune the next. Andrew Shaw
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50 Years of New Zealand Television - Episode One

2010, Subject - Television

This is the opening episode of the Prime TV series celebrating 50 years of New Zealand television: from an opening night puppet show in Auckland in 1960, through to Outrageous Fortune five decades later. It traverses the medium's development and its major turning points (including the rise of programme-making and news, networking, colour and the arrival of TV3, Prime, NZ on Air, Sky and Māori Television) and interviews key players. The changing nature of the NZ living room — always with the telly in pride of place as modern hearth — is a story within a story.

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A Drop of Kulcha

1978, Director

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Anything Could Happen

1981, Director - Music video

Was there a cooler band in the world than The Clean in 1982? Skinny suits, round sunglasses, video performances aping the great old Monkees' moves but tuned to the "deadpan" setting. Rubbish dump. Derelict building. Cemetery. Check. TVNZ's Andrew Shaw travelled south to Christchurch to direct this one, but he kept the clip faithful to the band's style for this now iconic tribute to indie nihilism.

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Being Eve

2001 - 2002, Executive Producer - Television

This quirky, upbeat comedy-drama looked at teen life through the eyes of 15-year-old Eve (Fleur Saville). Something of an amateur teen anthropologist, Eve questions everything in her world, musing on life to the camera and in voiceover. The series' fresh, self-aware style appealed directly to media-savvy teenagers. The TV3 series launched Saville's TV career, fostered young directing and producing talent, won many awards (including Best Drama Series at the 2002 NZ TV Awards) and sold to over 40 territories, screening in the US on Nickelodeon.

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Being Eve - Being Upstaged

2002, Executive Producer - Television

Being Eve was a popular and self-aware comedy-drama for teens. It launched the career of actor Fleur Saville, who played 15-year-old amateur teen anthropologist Eve. This excerpt from episode 22 of the second series sees angst and ambition collide as Eve dreams of Hollywood success via a school Shakespeare production. Shakespeare himself makes a cameo (as Eve's muse), as she struggles with her original vision for the classic, but will she be upstaged by Sam? Being Eve won best drama at the 2002 NZ TV Awards and fostered young directing and producing talent.

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Blind Date - Series One, Programme Three

1989, Director - Television

The basic format of Blind Date involves putting a series of questions to three potential dates who cannot be seen. First in the driver's seat is Natalie, a “part-time actress and model who would love to meet somebody fast and exciting” — though not too fast. Her choices are a “Greenpeace supporter”, an accounts clerk, and a welder who likes to work out. Watch out for Suzanne Paul as one of the show's later suitors, who gets laughs for stating the romantic importance of a well-built wallet. Also two contestants provide a post-mortem on their blind date.

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Clash of the Codes - Season One, Episode 10

1993, Producer - Television

Clash of the Codes was a made-for-TV series that pitted teams representing various sports against each other in a series of devised physical challenges. In this final episode from the first series, rowing and canoeing are the frontrunners, with plenty of Olympic podium experience on both teams (Ian Ferguson, Eric Verdonk and Chris White, plus world champ sculler Phillipa  Baker). They tackle a steep bush rescue and the army confidence course at Whangaparaoa Peninsula. A young Marc Ellis (rugby) gets early practice playing the larrikin onscreen.

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Corbans Fashion Collections

1990 - 1998, Executive Producer - Television

Corbans Fashion Collections was a live event and TV special staged annually in the 1990s, where local fashion houses showcased their upcoming collections. The producer of both the live shows and the TV programmes was Pieter Stewart, who went on to launch NZ Fashion Week. The first special screened in 1990, and the last in 1997 (the 96 and 97 shows changed names to Wella Fashion Collections as a new sponsor came on board). In 1998/99 the show morphed into the Wella Fashion Report, four seasonal specials screening in Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter.

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Corbans Fashion Collections - 1994

1994, Executive Director - Television

Corbans Fashion Collections was a live event and TV special staged annually in the 1990s, where local fashion houses showcased their upcoming collections. The producer of the live show was Pieter Stewart, who went on to launch NZ Fashion Week. In this 1994 show, Shortland Street stars pock the front row, Alison Mau, Paula Ryan and designers opine on the dress code, grunge doesn’t appear to have impacted on the à la mode pastel styles (Zambesi and NOM*D are typically dark in contrast), and NZ On Screen editor Paul Ward channels Zoolander as a teenage male model.

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Corbans Fashion Collections - 1995

1995, Executive Producer - Television

Corbans Fashion Collections was a live event and TV special staged annually in the 1990s, where local fashion houses showcased their upcoming collections. The producer of both the live shows and the TV programmes was Pieter Stewart, who went on to launch NZ Fashion Week. This 1995 show is narrated by Craig Parker and Alison Mau; Fashion Quarterly editor of the time, Paula Ryan, gives style tips; and Geeling Ng and Hinemoa Elder feature as celebrity models stepping out for Francis Hooper and Denise L'Estrange-Corbet's World label.

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Don't Fight it Marsha, It's Bigger Than Both of Us

1981, Director - Music video

Blam Blam Blam’s second hit from 1981 was angular and artsy, hook-filled but unsettling: all qualities captured in a theatrical video directed by Hey Hey It’s Andy host Andrew Shaw. Clowns, magicians, fire-eaters and trick cyclists join the band, while actors play out the saga of ‘Don’t Fight It, Marsha’. Don McGlashan’s future Front Lawn partner Harry Sinclair directed the actors – Phillip Gordon, Michael Hurst, Hester Joyce and Donogh Rees – and the Len Lye-style scratch effects were by Jenny Pullar, the Blams’ lighting designer.

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Hey Hey It's Andy

1977, Presenter

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Kiwi Concert Party

1983, Director

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Live At Mainstreet - Dance Exponents

1983, Producer - Television

This concert from May 1983 finds Dance Exponents — one of five bands filmed for a Radio with Pictures live series — with their star on the rise but yet to release their debut album. An irrepressible Jordan Luck and band mates Dave Gent, Brian Jones and Mike Harralambi perform six songs in front of an enthusiastic full house at Auckland's premier venue Mainstreet Cabaret. Highlights include a sparse, urgent 'Victoria' and a barnstorming 'Airway Spies'; while opener 'Perfect Romance' was only ever released in this version from a companion live album.  

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No Opportunity Wasted

2006, Executive Producer - Television

No Opportunity Wasted was a reality show devised by Phil Keoghan, Emmy Award-winning Kiwi host of The Amazing Race. In the show Keoghan ambushed contestants and gave them a limited time (three days) and limited resources (usually $3000) to ditch the excuses and "live life now". Challenges included swimming with sharks, building a giant community playground, and a NZ tough guy competition (that included future Olympic champion rower Eric Murray). The New Zealand edition followed on from the inaugural series that screened on Discovery Channel in the US in 2004.

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No Opportunity Wasted - Tough Guy (Episode)

2006, Series Producer - Television

No Opportunity Wasted is a reality show where Phil Keoghan (Amazing Race), ambushes contestants and bids them overcome a challenge with limited time (three days) and resources. This episode ditches the self-help aspect and ups the machismo by having a freezing worker, southern shepherd, champion rower, trans-Atlantic race winner, Kiwi league legend, and ex-Mr New Zealand compete in old school elimination challenges for NZ's 'toughest man' title. Future Olympic champ Eric Murray is the young buck wrestling for the hardman mantle with wily Mark 'Horse' Bourneville.

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Outlook for Thursday

1983, Director - Music video

A weather-themed clip for a weather-themed Kiwi classic that spent 23 weeks in the charts when it was first released. The quirky video (Auckland’s split personality climate is leveraged to fine effect) was played over and over on Ready to Roll and won Best Music Video at the 1983 Music Awards. It was directed by a young Andrew Shaw (of Hey Hey It’s Andy fame and now a TVNZ supremo). Dobbyn hams it up in Adidas trackies and yellow raincoat, and DD Smash drummer (and 1980s heart-throb) Peter “Rooda” Warren appears in his speedos — of course.

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Petrouchka in Performance

1993, Producer, Director - Television

This televised 1993 performance of Stravinsky’s Petrouchka by the Royal New Zealand Ballet stays true to the original 1911 Ballet Russes version in more than just spelling. Douglas Wright as the titular tormented puppet pays tribute to original performer Vaslav Nikinsky; designer Raymond Boyce channels Alexandre Benois and Russell Kerr's choreography evokes Mikhail Fokine. The sell-out season was reviewed as "phenomenal" and "a visual feast… exploding with colour and shifting image". It was directed by former kids TV host and future TV exec Andrew Shaw. 

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Radio Times

1980 - 1983, Director - Television

The launchpad for Billy T’s rise to television superstar, Radio Times recreates an era when home entertainment involved another type of box entirely. Inspired by 30s and 40s era radio extravaganzas, producer Tom Parkinson creates a show complete with swinging dancehall band, adventure serials and coconut shell sound effects. Parkinson’s masterstroke was casting Billy T as the oh-so-British compere glueing everything together (and occasionally sliding effortlessly into a different accent). The Yandall Sisters, singer Craig Scott and writer Derek Payne also feature.

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Radio with Pictures

1976 - 1988, Director - Television

For a generation of music fans rock show Radio with Pictures was their link to local and international music — and essential viewing before TV2's Sunday night horror movies. Following on from the Grunt Machine in 1976, its presenters included Dr Rock (Barry Jenkin), Phil O'Brien, Karyn Hay and Dick Driver. RWP's run coincided with the rise of MTV and the music video, and a burgeoning 80s New Zealand music scene. Videos were a staple but artist interviews also featured and the show staged a number of televised concerts featuring leading local artists.

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Shark in the Park

1988 - 1991, Director - Television

A big smoke cousin to Mortimer's Patch, Shark in the Park was NZ's first urban cop show and first true genre police drama. Devised by Graham Tetley, it portrayed a unit policing Wellington's inner city under the guidance of Inspector Brian "Sharkie" Finn (Jeffrey Thomas). With its focus on the working lives of the officers, it was firmly in the mould of overseas programmes like The Bill and Hill Street Blues. The first of three series was the last in-house production for TVNZ's drama department. The other two were made independently by The Gibson Group.

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Shortland Street - Highlights from the first 15 years

1992 - 2007, Executive Producer - Television

Shortland Street is a fast-paced serial drama set in an eponymous inner city Auckland hospital. A South Pacific Pictures production, the iconic show is based around the births, deaths and marriages of the staff, family and patients. Screening five days a week on TV2 it is New Zealand’s longest running drama. Characters and lines from the show have entered the culture, most famously, "you're not in Guatemala now, Dr Ropata!". This 2007 promo, set to the theme song, collects together highlights from the first 15 years of the show.

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Star Zone

1978, Presenter

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Telethon

1975 - 1993, Producer - Television

Telethon was a 24-hour live television spectacular aimed at securing donations from viewers for a charitable cause. The first, in 1975, launched the second channel (TV2) and raised over half a million dollars for St John's Ambulance. By 1981 Telethon had hit the $5 million mark. Along with willing local celebrities, volunteers and a receptive public, it attracted overseas stars: Basil Brush, Entertainment Tonight's Leeza Gibbons and Coronation Street's Christopher Quinton (who famously got together after the 1988 show). "Thank you very much for your kind donation!" 

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The Herd

1985, Director

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The Krypton Factor - Episode Seven

1991, Director

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There is No Depression in New Zealand

1981, Director - Music video

This classic alternative national anthem by Auckland post-punk trio Blam Blam Blam became a theme song for New Zealand’s long, troubled winter of 1981 as the country was wracked by social and political division and the Springbok Tour. Poet and playwright Richard von Sturmer wrote the lyrics while the music was by Blams member Don McGlashan. The video features a band performance shot on the roof of TVNZ’s Shortland Street studios and shows a curious penchant for celebrity lawn mowing. The performing Marmite and Vegemite jars are, however, the real deal.

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Virginia

1980, Director - Music video

After four years on the edges of the limelight in Hello Sailor, guitarist Dave McArtney stepped out with his own band The Pink Flamingos — and found himself very much the centre of attention in this video made by TVNZ for the Flamingos' debut single. With only his guitar for support, he roams the streets of downtown Wellington stalking the object of his desire, who remains largely impassive despite his protestations — and all but obscured in a haze of cigarette smoke. Locations include an empty Cuba Mall (beside the bucket fountain) and Plimmer Steps.

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