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Clips (2)

  1. An excerpt from this documentary.

  2. The credits from this programme.

Synopsis

Actor Michael Hurst began life in northern England, then moved to Christchurch at age eight. In this Here to Stay episode he looks at the pervasive elements of Kiwi culture that derive from mother England — from roasts, rugby, tea and the Mini, to a language and legal system. In this excerpt Hurst fries up fish'n'chips with Ray McVinnie, stalks deer with Davey Hughes, and explores how class ideals travelled south to Mt Peel and Christ's College .... A chorus of Kiwis, including ex-All Blacks' captain David Kirk and historian Jock Phillips, ponder the influence.

 

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Quotes

We’ve [New Zealanders] got a sort of tolerance to other other people — as long as they accepted the superiority of English values. 
A lot of the things that we think of being central to New Zealand identity: being good at war ... hunting ... were values and experiences which actually in England, were part of the English upper class. And what happened in New Zealand, was that those values came to New Zealand, and then got universalised. 
For New Zealand it [winning matches against England] was an opportunity — back to the big brother, little brother syndrome — to show that we might have gone away, we might be 12,000 miles away, and it might be 100 years since, but we’d figured out how to play the game and we were coming back to show our teachers how to do it.