Cinematographer Duncan Cole has trained his lens on big screen hip hop wannabes (Born to Dance), stuntmen (The Devil Dared Me To), rapists (For Good) and strange magicians (The Last Magic Show). The last won Cole an NZ Screen Award. The movie credits sit atop a slate of shorts, commercials and music videos — including one-shot wonder Sophie, for Goodshirt (made with regular collaborator Joe Lonie).

You go round to his house and, if music TV is on, you can hardly talk to him. I'm not cynical about music videos at all. Neither of us are. Director Joe Lonie on Cole's dedication to the music video form, NZ Herald 24 October 2003

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Shout at the Ground

2016, Cinematographer - Short Film

Born to Dance

2015, Cinematographer - Film

Tu (real-life hip hop champ Tia Maipi) has six weeks to show the talent that will win him a spot in an international dance group. As the high octane trailer for Born to Dance makes clear, that doesn’t leave much time to muck around. The first movie directed by actor Tammy Davis (Outrageous Fortune) features music by P-Money, and choreography by Manurewa’s own world champ hip hop sensation Parris Goebel (who helped choreograph J. Lo’s 2012 tour). The cast includes Stan Walker and American Kherington Payne (Fame). Playwright Hone Kouka is one of the writing team. 

Restoration

2015, Cinematographer - Short Film

Loading Docs 2015 - Dancing in the Dark

2015, Cinematographer, Camera Operator - Web

Celebrating the “transformative power of dance”, Dancing in the Dark centres on Peter Vosper, an inventor who has designed his own custom light suit as an outlet for his creativity. It also makes the perfect addition to No Lights No Lycra, an event where participants spend an hour dancing to upbeat music in the dark. While most dancers can’t be seen (as is the appeal of the event — dance like no one’s watching), Peter’s glowing suit takes centre stage and makes for quite the spectacle. The film is part of the Loading Docs series of shorts, made for exhibition online.

Dive

2014, Cinematographer - Short Film

Animals

2014, Cinematographer - Short Film

Russian Dolls

2013, Cinematographer - Television

Strongman

2013, Cinematographer - Short Film

Honk if You're Horny

2012, Cinematographer - Short Film

Ten Thousand Days

2012, Cinematographer - Short Film

Acker

2011, Cinematographer - Music video

I Can't Stop Being Foolish

2009, Camera - Music video

Do robots dream of mechanical owls? A young woman in distress wakes up to find she has a 'robot problem' in her apartment. As the wee ‘bots (resembling animated cuisenaire rods) cause mayhem, she calls for help on her rat-phone. Roused from the Winter Gardens, an exterminator and his giant caged owl come to the rescue. The promo was one of several shot for The Mint Chicks by Crystal Bear-winning short film director Sam Peacocke (Manurewa). To create the miniature robots, life-size puppets were shot in front of a green screen, then composited into the action.

Whiteout

2008, Cinematographer - Music video

The Devil Dared Me To

2007, Cinematographer - Film

From the duo (Matt Heath and Chris Strapp) behind bad taste TV series Back of the Y, this feature follows Randy Cambell's rocket car driven mission to be "NZ’s greatest living stuntman". Gross and petrol-fuelled palaver ensues en route to a date with speedway destiny, as Cambell romances a one-legged female Evil Knievel, and fights a not-so-death defying family curse. Scott Weinberg (Cinematical) praised this low budget "cross between The Road Warrior, Mad Magazine and Jackass" as "loud, raucous and adorably stupid" when it premiered at US fest SXSW 2007. 

Watching Waiting

2007, Cinematographer - Music video

The Last Magic Show

2007, Cinematographer, Visual Effects - Film

All For You

2006, Cinematographer - Music video

Hey Bang Bang

2006, Cinematographer - Music video

Arithmetic

2004, Cinematographer - Music video

The clip for this single off Brooke Fraser’s seven time platinum selling album debut What to do with Daylight works from a simple concept. Accompanied by a string quartet, Fraser sings sweetly from behind a grand piano in an empty studio. Most distinctive however is the clip's liberal use of fairy lights, which cover the studio wall, the piano and the string quartet. This abundance didn’t go unnoticed: children's show Studio 2 gave Arithmetic the (satirical) award for “most use of fairy lights in a video clip”. The song reached number eight on the New Zealand Singles Chart.

Sweet Az Bro

2003, Cinematographer - Music video

For Good

2003, Cinematographer - Film

New Zealand's so-called 'cinema of unease' is stretched in new directions in this psychological drama, inspired by real-life interviews with criminals and victim's families. Writer/director Stuart McKenzie's feature debut follows Lisa (Michelle Langstone), a young woman haunted by the rape and murder of a former teenage acquaintance. Lisa's fascination leads her to the victim's parents - and to prison, to interview the charismatic killer (Tim Balme). The result is an intelligent examination of the after effects of violent crime. Shayne Carter provides the soundtrack.

Rockstar

2002, Camera - Music video

With a super-simple yet thrillingly impressive concept, Gareth Edwards makes a rock'n'roll dream come to life in this technicolour smash up. Impressive editing and lighting, and gung-ho performances combine to embellish a terrific punk-pop song.  

Sophie

2002, Cinematographer - Music video

How long does it take to remove all the furniture and fittings from an apartment? If you’ve got band Goodshirt on the case, apparently three minutes and 45 seconds. One of a series of Goodshirt music videos directed by Joe Lonie, all of them filmed in one continuous take, this clip highlights the dangers of having the volume up too loud. As a young woman listens to Goodshirt’s latest single, she is unaware she is being robbed her of everything she owns. Sophie took away three gongs at the 2003 NZ Music Awards: Best Video , Best Single and Songwriter of the Year.

Venus

1998, Director - Music video

The video for this Kiwi pop classic is a live performance-based affair, with a background story involving a girl, a creepy guy and a beat-up old car. The extended swooping shots of the band playing live were done at the Hastings Municipal Theatre (now know as the Hawke's Bay Opera House). 'Venus' featured on The Feelers' debut album Supersystem, which became one of New Zealand's biggest selling albums of 1998.  

Pressure Man

1998, Camera - Music video

The first single off mutli-platinum 1998 album Supersystem helped bring Christchurch rockers The Feelers to a wide audience. For the video, director Joe Lonie has been given the resources to pull out all the stops — maintaining momentum with constant motion and cutting, while underlining the pressure motif by having the band performing in a boiler room, and claustrophobically running through a pipe. 'Pressure Man' was nominated for Best Video at the 1998 New Zealand Music Awards. Lonie had first begun making music videos while playing bass for Supergroove. 

Without a Doubt

1998, Director - Music video

Che Fu’s influential debut album 2b S.Pacific (1998) melded Pasifika with reggae, soul and hip hop, to create a unique musical home brew. The first single 'Scene III' went to number four on the local charts, and this follow-up (a double A-side, paired with 'Machine Talk') got to the top in October 1998. Cinematographer Duncan Cole (Born to Dance) directs the music video, which sees a pair of Fu personas (street and club?) facing cameras in a film studio, while singing about making "the planet shake". Later Che Fu adds some comedy to a breakdance battle.