Taranaki-born Eric Young wrote the first of many articles and columns on sport in the 1980s, for The Auckland Star. Since moving to television for TV3's 1989 launch, he has co-presented TVNZ news show Tonight, reported for ESPN in Singapore, and since 2006 presented the news for Prime TV and Sky. In 2008 he won three awards, including Sportswriter of the Year; he hosted Prime's coverage of the 2012 Olympics.

Journalistic detachment goes out the window for me the moment they play God Defend New Zealand at an Olympic Games. When it played for the Evers-Swindells in 2008, I was standing a couple of metres behind the New Zealand flag, bawling down the phone to my wife. While also managing to grin stupidly. Eric Young
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London Olympic Games

2012, Presenter

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New Delhi Commonwealth Games

2010, Presenter

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50 Years of New Zealand Television

2010, Subject - Television

This major documentary series chronicles the first half century of Kiwi television. Made for the Prime network (after being declined by TVNZ), it examines the medium’s evolution across seven episodes. After an opening 70 minute overview, individual programmes covered the stories of sport, entertainment, drama and comedy, protest coverage, New Zealand identity and Māori television — with an impressive array of interviews, and 50 years worth of telly highlights. John Bates was nominated for Best Documentary Director at the 2011 Aotearoa Film and TV Awards.

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50 Years of New Zealand Television: 4 - Winners and Losers

2010, Subject - Television

This fourth episode in Prime’s series on Kiwi television history series charts 50 years of sports on TV. Interviews with veteran broadcasters are mixed with clips of classic sporting moments. Changes in technology are surveyed: from live broadcasts and colour TV, to slo-mo replays and CGI graphics. Sports coverage is framed as a national campfire where Kiwis have been able to share in test match, Olympic, Commonwealth and World Cup triumphs and disasters — from emotional national anthems and inspirational Paralympians, to underarm deliveries, snapped masts and face-plants.

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This is Your Life - Lance Cairns

1999, Writer - Television

Host Paul Holmes looks back on the life of “the Colin Meads of cricket” — the big hearted, Excalibur-wielding Lance Cairns; although the celebration is just as often of his enthusiastic fondness for the game’s social side. A cavalcade of cricket stars (Chappell, Botham, Lillee, Marsh, Hadlee, Coney, Chatfield, Crowe and son Chris) reminisce — with the remarkable sixes in his innings at Melbourne in 1983 coming in for special attention. Cairns’ profound deafness and the death of his daughter in a level crossing accident provide a more serious note.

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Tight Five

1999, Presenter

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Tonight

2003 - 2005, Newsreader - Television

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Game of Two Halves

1999 - 2002, Presenter - Television

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Prime News

2006 - ongoing, Newsreader - Television

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Breakfast

2003 - 2005, Presenter - Television

Breakfast first aired in August 1997 on TV One. Screening five mornings a week over a three hour time slot, the programme mixes news and entertainment interviews with updates of news, sport and weather. The format of one male and one female presenter began with original hosts Mike Hosking and Susan Wood, and has included Pippa Wetzell and Paul Henry (who won controversy for Breakfast comments about an Indian politician), and Brit Rawdon Christie and Alison Pugh. A Saturday version of Breakfast was trialled in 2011, but abandoned the next year.  

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3 News / Newshub

1989 - 1995, Sports Presenter - Television

Independent channel TV3 launched its prime time bulletin on 27 November 1989. The flagship 6pm bulletin — originally called 3 National News — was anchored by ex state TV legend Philip Sherry, with Greg Clark handling sports. Sherry was replaced by Joanna Paul, then another ex TVNZ anchor, John Hawkesby. A 1998 revamp saw Carol Hirschfeld and John Campbell take on dual anchor roles. Their move to Campbell Live in 2005 opened the doors for a decade-long run by Hilary Barry and Mike McRoberts. In 2016 Mediaworks rebranded its news service — and the slot — as Newshub.

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TV One News

2002 - 2005, Newsreader - Television

In 1975 TV One launched with a flagship 6.30 news bulletin which went largely unchanged with the move to TVNZ in 1980. In a 1987 revamp, it became the Network News with dual newsreaders Judy Bailey and Neil Billington (replaced by Richard Long). In 1988, the half hour programme moved to 6pm. With the advent of TV3 in late 1989, it was rebranded One Network News; and, from 1995, extended to an hour. The ill-fated replacing of Long with John Hawkesby in 1999 saw it make headlines rather than report them. In 1999, there was another name change to One News.

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Olympic Games

2000, Presenter - Television