Joe Lonie began making music videos while playing bass for legendary band Supergroove. Since then his 60 plus music clips — four of them Tui award-winners — have included one-shot wonders Gather To The Chapel (for Liam Finn) and Blowin’ Dirt (for Goodshirt). On top of a busy commercials career, and a Cannes Gold Lion award, Lonie began adding drama to his CV in 2012, thanks to foulmouthed, festival-hopping taxi short Honk if You're Horny, and South Auckland-set web series The Factory.

Filmmaking is the best job there is. Every time I get the chance to do it I count myself extremely lucky. Joe Lonie
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Shout at the Ground

2016, Director, Writer - Short Film

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The Factory

2013, Director - Web

Web series The Factory is the largely light-hearted tale of one South Auckland family, and their love of music — though not everyone in this family agrees which type of music deserves loving the most. A $50,000 talent prize is up for grabs, and the Saumalu family are keen to compete, on behalf of the textile factory where their father and grandfather Tigi work. Only Tigi wants them to perform a traditional Samoan number. The kids would rather freestyle. The 20-part web series was first born as a hit stage musical from theatre group Kila Kokonut Kollective.

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The Factory - 01, Wassup?! (Episode One)

2013, Director, Additional Dialogue - Web

Tigi Saumalu (Ben Taufua) has worked at an Auckland textile factory for so many years, he is presented with a useless plastic key by his palangi boss to mark the occasion. But Tigi is more excited about getting his grandchildren to represent the factory in an upcoming talent contest. That way he can “pass on the old ways” — and the old Samoan songs — to them. Only the Saumalu children are busy freestyling to a very different sound... Web series The Factory began as a hit stage musical from South Auckland-based theatre and music group Kila Kokonut Krew.

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The Factory - 02, Gafa (Episode Two)

2013, Director, Additional Dialogue - Web

Web series The Factory follows a South Auckland family as they prepare to conquer a local talent quest. In episode two the Saumalus get their first worried indication of their grandfather’s musical plans for them, after a summons to the factory where he works. Meanwhile news in the mail leaves older sister Losa worried if she'll ever pass her degree, and younger sister Moana starts hanging out with a music-loving Indian teen, whose newest role model is Che Guevara. The Factory is directed by Supergroove bassist and music video king Joe Lonie.  

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The Factory - 03, Sexy Time (Episode Three)

2013, Director, Additional Dialogue - Web

A  knife-wielding duet is the highlight of this episode of web series The Factory. Tavita (Taofia Pelesasa) oldest sibling in the Saumalu family, sneaks out one night to earn some under the counter cash; he ends up showing off his musical chops, alongside Moka (Milly Grant). Meanwhile Mum Lily (Anapela Polataivao) starts to worry that the family’s devotion to their grandfather will result in serious musical embarrassment, once the talent quest kicks off. Polataivao was one of the creators of The Factory’s original incarnation, as a hit stage musical.

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The Factory - 04, Umu (Episode Four)

2013, Director, Additional Dialogue - Web

Web series The Factory is a tale of family and music, inspired by a stage show that became one of the hits of the 2013 Auckland Arts Festival, then travelled to Australia and the Edinburgh Festival. In the fourth episode, try-hard next door neighbour Api tells Losa she ought to be singing alongside him, in the upcoming talent quest. Losa responds by comparing his haircut to a toilet brush. Meanwhile Losa's mother Lily is somewhat surprised to arrive at a party, and find her oven out on the street.

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The Factory - 05, Paua Struggle (Episode Five)

2013, Director, Additional Dialogue - Web

Contest day has finally dawned; but will the competitors make it on stage in time? In this fifth episode of the PI-flavoured web series, it is the big day for the X-Factory contest, but as the first teams start performing, one of the Saumalus is missing in action: oldest sibling Tavita (Taofia Pelesasa) is caught up in some delicate yet insult-filled negotiations involving black market paua. The makers of The Factory auditioned talent in various South Auckland halls and markets; nearly half of the cast are first time actors. 

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The Factory - 06, Showtime! (Episode Six)

2013, Director, Additional Dialogue - Web

In this episode of the 2014 web series, South Auckland family the Saumulus finally make it on stage to perform in a best-of-the-factories talent quest. Tensions rise before the family debut, with teenager Tavita late to arrive. The Saumalus sneak through, but one of the judges warns that their act needs an upgrade: “this is X Factory not the History Channel.” Later a fish spill threatens to expose Tavita’s after hours work, as events at the laundry heat up. The Factory was inspired by the Kila Kokonut Krew musical stage show.

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The Factory - 07, Sh*t Salad (Episode Seven)

2013, Director, Additional Dialogue - Web

This 2014 web series follows a South Auckland family who set their sights on winning a best-of-the-factories talent quest. In the seventh episode the Saumalus have just snuck through to the next round of the quest, but patriarch Tigi doesn’t seem to have heeded the judge's advice to come back with something from “this century”. Factory boss Keith makes a shock announcement about the factory’s future: the sale of the factory threatens half the workforce. As discussions continue on how to respond to the news, Tavita gets the Romeo and Juliet blues.

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The Factory - 08, Time to Shine (Episode Eight)

2013, Director, Additional Dialogue - Web

In the eighth episode of this tale of family, factory and music, the Saumalus protest the sale of Murdoch Textiles and expeted loss of jobs. Indian-Kiwi student Dev (Shaan Kesha) enlists Moana in his plan to break into the boss’s office and make the workers' voices heard. Even if Dev’s blundering scheme doesn’t impress Moana, it does enable subtle marketing use of the show’s sponsorship from Telecom (now Spark) — “what’s your phone number again? 027 SHITFORBRAINS?”.

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The Factory - 09, Ballbag (Episode Nine)

2013, Director, Additional Dialogue - Web

In the ninth episode of this web series, Dev (Shaan Kesha) tries to make up for his protests over the factory's impending sale to Chinese buyers: including a spraypainted message in the boss's office, calling him a 'ballbag'. Uni accounting studies pay dividends, as Dev persuades factory boss Keith (Cameron Rhodes) to call the sale of Murdoch Textiles off. There are even more surprising developments to come, after Moana introduces Dev to a Saumalu family dinner. Actor Rhodes was also seen in acclaimed 2014 horror film Housebound

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The Factory - 10, No Butter Chicken (Episode 10)

2013, Director, Additional Dialogue - Web

This 2014 web series follows a South Auckland family chasing a talent quest title. In this 10th episode (out of 20) the Saumalu family debates Moana’s shock announcement that she is getting engaged to Indian-Kiwi Dev. The head-girl and student DJ are a South Auckland Romeo and Juliet. Dad Kavana wants to send Moana home for some ‘Fa’a Samoa’ (‘Samoan way’) education. Meanwhile Moana finds out that Dev is already engaged, and decides to move things to the next level. The series was based on the hit stage show that debuted at the 2013 Auckland Arts Festival.

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Honk if You're Horny

2012, Director, Writer - Short Film

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Don't Feed the Ducks (Wonder Performance bread)

2008, Director - Television

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The Devil Dared Me To

2007, As: TV Director - Film

From the duo (Matt Heath and Chris Strapp) behind bad taste TV series Back of the Y, this feature follows Randy Cambell's rocket car driven mission to be "NZ’s greatest living stuntman". Gross and petrol-fuelled palaver ensues en route to a date with speedway destiny, as Cambell romances a one-legged female Evil Knievel, and fights a not-so-death defying family curse. Scott Weinberg (Cinematical) praised this low budget "cross between The Road Warrior, Mad Magazine and Jackass" as "loud, raucous and adorably stupid" when it premiered at US fest SXSW 2007. 

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Gather to the Chapel

2007, Director - Music video

Another all in one shot beauty from director Joe Lonie, this gorgeously-crafted video was filmed in and around the historic St Stephen's Chapel above Auckland's Judges Bay and Parnell Baths. The camera floats through pohutukawa trees and Auckland pioneer gravestones as an ubiquitous Liam Finn exhorts everyone to gather by the chapel. The tiny, elegant church in question was built by Bishop Selwyn, and as it turns out, just around the corner from where Finn grew up. 'Gather to the Chapel' appears on his first solo album, 2007's I'll Be Lightning.

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Falling

2004, Director - Music video

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Blowin' Dirt

2001, Director - Music video

Goodshirt's attention-grabbing promos were typified by high concepts rendered with low-budget No 8 wire smarts — ofen with game participation from the band members. This mind-bending creation by director (and ex-Supergroover) Joe Lonie is no exception: a Mazda 929 (or an Austin 1300 if you watch the video's other version) is re-deconstructed, before leaving in a cloud of smoke, loaded with frog men. Lead singer Rodney Fisher's gives the stand out performance. He had to sing every lyric backwards to achieve the desired time-warping end result. 

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Sophie

2001, Director - Music video

How long does it take to remove all the furniture and fittings from an apartment? If you’ve got Goodshirt on the case, apparently 3 minutes and 47 seconds. Part of a series of Goodshirt music videos directed by Joe Lonie and filmed in one continuous take, this video highlights the dangers of having the volume up too loud. As a young woman sits down to listen to Goodshirt’s latest single, she is unaware of the band robbing her of everything she owns. The video won Best Music Video at the 2003 NZ Music Awards.

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Screems from da Old Plantation

2000, Director - Music video

"Samoa mo Samoa!" — King Kapisi blends his Samoan roots with hip hop culture in this video shot on Samoa's ring roads. The hip hop music video standby of the drive-by gets revised Pasifika-style, and the fire poi, papase'ea sliding rocks, lavalava, coconuts, and colourful Apia buses make this clip staunchly fa'a Samoa.

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Pressure Man

1998, Director - Music video

This video for the debut single from Christchurch rockers The Feelers was one of the first made by director Joe Lonie after the disbanding of Supergroove (where he played bass, and learnt his craft directing their videos). It earned Lonie a nomination for Best Video at the 1998 NZ Music Awards. The video begins, as it ends, with a man fleeing from unseen forces. Lonie builds and maintains momentum with constant motion and cutting, while underlining the pressure motif by having the band performing in a boiler room, and claustrophobically running through a pipe.

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Derail

1994, Director - Music video

From Shihad’s first album Churn, the video for 'Derail' is a dark and unsettling affair, recasting everyday Kiwi pursuits in a tense, almost disturbing manner. It’s directed by ex-Supergroover Joe Fisher (now known as Joe Lonie), who marries their dissonant riffs and twisted time signatures to black and white footage of horse racing and punters at the track.  Added to the kiwiana gothic mix is some serious looking gumboot tossing, churches and religious imagery: cows and power pylons, golf, bumper boats, roller coasters and dodgems.

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Sitting Inside My Head

1994, Director - Music video

Shot in alternating colour and moody black and white, this is a straightforward music video: cutting together a wahine washing her hair in a basin, with the band performing on a garbage strewn wasteland, slo-mo strolling along a city street, and singer Che Fu (Chicago White Sox cap and duffle coat) wandering a wintry North Shore beach. Director and band member Joe Lonie captures lively performances from the band's multiple members, to help bring the clip to life.

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You Gotta Know

1994, Director - Music video

Black, white and red and youthful exuberance abound in this early music video from Supergroove, where a funk-heavy live performance is intercut with scenes of the band clowning around at the Otara Market, on a Three Kings volcano, and crowded into the back of an open-top VW. The hairstyle of vocalist and future Cambridge classics scholar Karl Steven — shaved aside from an extended fringe arrangement at the front — is a relic from another era.

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Can't Get Enough

1994, Director - Music video

It had to be a hell of an ask getting all seven members of Supergroove in shot and looking good (most of the time) for this video, but the result trips along with great editing and special effects. Shot in one, extended all day session, Can't Get Enough was directed by band member Joe Lonie, who went on to helm at least 60 more music videos for a variety of musicians. His early effort took away Best Video at the 1995 New Zealand Music Awards.

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Scorpio Girls

1993, Director - Music video

Supergroove's 'Scorpio Girls' hit number three on the NZ charts in 1993 and was the band's first single to attain gold record status. It was also included as the opening track on their 1994 debut album Traction. The video, directed by Supergroove bass player Joe Lonie, translates the band's sense of fun and boundless energy to the small screen, combining live performance clips with footage of the band members, armed with torches and running through the old tunnels at North Head on Auckland's North Shore.