Subjects that have gone before cinematographer Marty Williams’ lens range from landscapes to South Auckland Shakespearians The Black Friars. Williams was a prolific shooter for arts shows The Gravy and The Living Room, and shared a Best Cinematography Qantas Award for maverick lawyer documentary Lost in Wonderland. Sometimes credited as Martyn Williams, the South Seas Film and TV School graduate also framed gang member OE short Day Trip, along with acclaimed work on adverts (often collaborating with director Mark Albiston) and music videos (Phoenix Foundation, Little Bushman).

Marty's backbone in documentary has given him an eye to shape light in a raw, beautiful fashion that feels achingly authentic. He can light a set to look a million bucks without emptying the lighting truck, and that's something cinematographers can only achieve with experience and talent. Director Louis Sutherland

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The World in Your Window

2017, Cinematographer - Short Film

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Yesterday/Today - Tokio Marine Asia

2015, Cinematographer - Television

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Dancers

2014, Cinematographer - Short Film

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The Audition (Louis Sutherland short film)

2014, Cinematographer - Short Film

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Kune's Kitchen

2014, Camera - Television

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Fascination Earth

2013, Camera - Television

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New Zealand from Above

2013, Cinematographer - Television

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Fresh Meat

2012, Second Camera Cinematographer - Film

In search of a hideout, gun-totting Gigi (Kate Elliott) and a gang with criminal tendencies end up in hot water after crashing into the lives of a middle class Māori family. To describe the whānau as meat lovers would be euphemistic. Actor/director Danny Mulheron has often gleefully given the finger to political correctness — witness Meet the Feebles, stage farce The Sex Fiend, and TV's Seven Periods with Mr Gormsby. This Gibson Group production marks his in your face cinematic debut. The anarchic result promises cannibalism, comedy — and chef Tem Morrison.

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Finding Mercy

2012, Cinematographer - Film

At the age of eight, filmmaker Robyn Paterson (white) and her best friend Mercy (black) greeted Comrade Robert Mugabe with flowers at a Zimbabwe air-force base. They became poster children of the new Zimbabwe. But the country was soon to descend into turmoil under Mugabe’s rule, and Paterson’s family was forced to flee to New Zealand. This documentary traces Paterson’s return to her birthplace a generation later, and a high-risk undercover search to find the fate of her childhood friend. Mercy won Paterson the Best Emerging Director Award at 2013 DocEdge Festival. 

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Whakatiki

2012, Cinematographer - Short Film

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Blakey

2011, Cinematographer - Television

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Hitch Hike

2011, Cinematographer - Short Film

This short film follows a teenage hitchhiker (Aaron McGregor) in search of his birth mother. The apprehension of the journey is heightened when he gets picked up by a mean-looking Māori (Calvin Tuteao) with a swastika tattooed on his face. The boy's great expectations wind up being realised in different ways than he might have imagined. The dramatic debut from actor-director Matthew Saville, Hitch Hike thumbed a ride to international festivals, from Tampere to Durban; the “emotionally engaging” film was selected for website Short of the Week in August 2014.

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Day Trip

2010, Cinematographer - Short Film

A gang member wakes up one morning and decides he needs a day off. Willy (ex-Mongrel Mob boss Tuhoe Isaac) checks out of the gang pad and, on a whim goes for a cruise on the Interislander. At a Picton Pub he makes an unlikely connection with brothers of a different clan. The near-wordless exploration of culture clashes and a man’s journey outside of his comfort zone, was the debut dramatic short from director Zoe McIntosh. It was selected for New York and Tribeca film fests, and Isaac won best performance in a short film at the 2010 Qantas Film and TV Awards.

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The Jono Project

2010 - 2011, Camera - Television

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The Black Friars

2010, Cinematographer - Television

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Buffalo

2010, Cinematographer - Music video

In this promo for the title track from the Phoenix Foundation's 2010 album a boy practises holding his breath, to better himself for meeting a sea nymph. It's a suitably giddy concept for a song that builds from its simple two-note intro onwards to a surging crescendo. "I'm on the sea floor / I am the mammal you adore / I'm on the sea floor, closer to the planet's core". A submarine South Coast swim and a glide through the pine trees of Wellington's Town Belt later, and our hero is united with his maiden. Directed by Nathan Hickey aka drummer for Beastwars.

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The Gravy - Series Four, Episode 11 (Prisons)

2009, Camera - Television

This episode of The Gravy takes an in-depth look at art in prisons. Host Warren Maxwell interviews inmates who have embraced painting or carving while serving time in Mt Eden, Paremoremo and Rimutaka prisons. At Rimutaka, art tutor Paul Bradley points out that art is a vehicle for change both for prisoners and the art audience, and former prisoners talk about how art has changed their lives for the better. Outside the walls, Warren visits at a caged exhibit of musical instruments at Artspace in Auckland and plays a few bars on the flute.

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Lost in Wonderland

2009, Camera - Film

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Reservoir Hill - 1, First Episode

2009, Co-Cinematographer - Television

Production company Krafthaus won an International Digital Emmy Award for this front-running interactive web series for young people, in which the audience texted in suggestions to drive the plot. Evoking a certain series of blockbuster vampire films, dark-haired beauty Beth Connolly (Beth Chote) arrives in a new town, where people are odd and the sky is permanently overcast. After a very strange reception from her classmates, brainbox Monika (Michelle Ny) shows Beth a picture of missing schoolgirl Tara — whom Beth is a dead ringer for.

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Reservoir Hill - 5, Series One, Episode Five

2009, Co-Cinematographer - Television

A text from an audience member advises Beth to go to Petra's party in the fifth ep of this International Emmy Award-winning web series for teens. While Beth tries to stay close to her friend Sammy, she is distracted by Petra, then Monika, then Matt ... each of whom tells her disturbing news relating to the disappearance of Beth's lookalike Tara. Despite their pact not to drink too much, Sammy ends up in a drunken fight with host Petra, who reveals the real reason why Lilli Jay is in hospital. Hurt that Beth left her alone, Sammy leaves the party by herself.

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The Gravy - Series Four, Episode 12 (Paint)

2009, Camera - Television

This fourth season edition of the award-winning arts series is all about paint. Host Ross Liew meets three artists who are exploring the medium's expressive possibilities in diverse ways: Ally Maher uses paint to portray corrosion, patina and the breaking down of surfaces; he reveals the work he did on the now-scuppered vessel Manuia for Peter Jackson’s King Kong. Helen Calder uses gravity, coaxing paint off the surface to make new shapes and Glenn Burrell encases objects in paint to form a skin and removes the original object, leaving a paint replica.

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Just a Little Mad

2008, Camera - Television

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So Free

2008, Cinematographer - Music video

Clearly made by people with a love of old school Hollywood horror, So Free dredges up a classic monster squad which includes Dracula, 'Frankristein', The 'Wülf Man', and a creature born in a black lagoon— all hell bent on distressing the damsel (Arem Steel). With lovingly-detailed set-pieces and effects, the clip looks tremendous. And after underwater and night shoots in midwinter Wellington, it was fortunate to be supported by a dedicated cast and crew (including band members playing the various monsters).

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The Gravy - Series Two, Episode Four

2008, Camera - Television

This episode of Sticky Pictures' show "about creative people, made by creative people" is hosted by TrinityRoots singer Warren Maxwell. Dominic Hoey (aka MC Tourettes) charts his journey from drumming in "really shitty" punk bands as a teen, to being published in national poetry journal Landfall; artist Liyen Chong talks to Ross Liew about her Malaysian heritage, and its influence on her intricate, complex artwork (including miniature prints made from hair); and the show joins animal-rights activist turned stencil artist Pete Howard on a late night postering mission.

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The Gravy - Series One, Episode Three

2007, Camera, Sound - Television

The Gravy, like its predecessor The Living Room (also produced by Sticky Pictures) was a fresh antidote to your standard 'worthy' arts series. In this episode, we meet The Damned Evangelist — a Lyttelton surf-punk trio inspired by B-movies and religious quackery; taxidermist Jacquelyn Greenbank, displaying her sideline in royally-themed crochet; and lastly a comically disturbing dispatch from Rachel Davies as she seeks out Jeremy Randerson, method actor-turned-proprietor of the legendary Foxton Fizz soda factory.

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White Lie

2007, Cinematographer - Short Film

A man stands alone in a room, watched by unsmiling faces, before literally falling into the rest of the group. Young women dance in time, their shoes belting out a rhythm on a wooden floor. A strange ritual of falling and rising is played out on a fog-shrouded hill. In this beautifully-lensed dance film, director Warren Green and choreographer Megan Adams take a new approach to showcasing the talents of acting students from drama school Toi Whakaari. The shifting, syncopated soundtrack is by Hamish Walker and David Holmes of Kog Transmissions.

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The Gravy - Series One, Episode Four (Tigilau Ness)

2007, Camera - Television

Hosted by Francis Kora, this episode of The Gravy is the story of musician and anti-apartheid activist Tigilau (Tigi) Ness, who during the 1970s joined the Polynesian Panthers movement in Auckland. Tigi Ness, the father of hip hop musician Che Fu, recalls his childhood in central Auckland and troubled times with the 1974 dawn raids and protests during the 1981 Springbok rugby tour for which he served nine months in prison. The episode also tells the story of his musical life in reggae bands such as Unity Pacific. Animated segment The Truth takes a look at lambs.

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Welcome Home

2007, Cinematographer - Short Film

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The Gravy

2007 - 2009, Camera - Television

The Gravy was made for TVNZ by Sticky Pictures. The award-winning arts series was described as a “30 minute tour through creative Aotearoa” — usually featuring three stories per episode, but with every fourth show showcasing one subject. Conceived as “a show about creative people made by creative people, both in front of the camera and behind”, it featured presenters who were practising artists: photographer/graphic artist Ross Liew, musician Warren Maxwell, and writer Gabe McDonnell. In total, roughly 170 artists were profiled across The Gravy's 52 episodes.

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The Gravy - Series Two, Episode Two

2007, Camera - Television

In this episode of Sticky Pictures' award-winning arts series, presenter Ross Liew turns the camera on his own craft as commercial illustrator / covert street artist, working alongside his partner Hayley King aka Flox. We then travel to the outer reaches of cyberspace (in reality, Lower Hutt) where Disasteradio explains his synth-pop formula of "cool beats, sweet riffs and awesome oxide". Lastly, it's the comic art of Robyn Kenealy, who constructs bizarre psychodramas involving her celebrity idols — namely Roddy McDowell and 90s heartthrob Jonathan Brandis.

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The Investigator

2007 - 2009, Camera - Television

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Million Dollar Tumour

2006, Camera - Television

In Million Dollar Tumour Dave Bowman narrates the “very personal tale” of his battle with cancer. The small town policeman was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 2005, aged 35. Bowman took on funding agency Pharmac and the bureaucracy of the public health system to try to get a treatment drug subsidised for himself and other sufferers. Although his efforts partly prevailed, Bowman died in mid 2006, after this Inside New Zealand documentary screened. Directed by Dave Crerar (Here to Stay), Million Dollar Tumour won Best Documentary at the 2006 Qantas TV Awards.  

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The Living Room - Series Three

2006, Camera - Television

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Let's Roll

2004, Camera - Music video

A live performance music video taken from the highly acclaimed Live at Bats album. Fly My Pretties creative director Barnaby Weir is out front in this one. The not-quite-black-and-white video treatment works well for the feel of the song and the elegant and atmospheric Fly My Pretties sound.  

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Lucky

2004, Camera - Music video

A live performance music video taken from the highly acclaimed Live at Bats album. Simply but stylishly shot and edited, this clip suits the moody style of this folk rock song from Fly My Pretties creative director Barnaby Weir.  

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Singing in My Soul

2004, Camera - Music video

This black and white performance music video is taken from  debut album Live at Bats (2004), back when the plan was for the Fly My Pretties ensemble to be a one-off project. Written and sung by Age Pryor — with vocal help from Tessa Rain — the gentle folk song is enhanced by simple but effective shooting, and attentive use of split-screen editing. The track was recorded in Wellington's Bats Theatre.

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The Living Room - Series Two, Episode Ten

2004, Camera - Television

This final episode from series two of the arts series is presented by Taika Cohen (aka Taika Waititi) and his alter ego, silly German Gunter Schliemann. Taika makes short film Tama Tū, performs as vampire Diego (later reborn in What We Do in the Shadows) and performs Taika’s Incredible Show at Bats Theatre. Included are scenes from his early, little-seen short film John & Pogo. Also featured are artist Siren Maclaine (aka Siren Deluxe) and her feminist erotica; Caroline Robinson’s large-scale Auckland motorway sculptures; and comics artist Colin Wilson (Judge Dredd, Blueberry).

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The Living Room - Series Two (excerpts)

2004 - 2005, Camera - Television

A magazine show with an edge, The Living Room won awards for its creative and dynamic approach to covering the arts. These excerpts from series two cover a wide range of artists, from those working in multimedia to those puttng stencil art on walls. Also featured are dub band Kora, novelist Kelly Ana Morey and drummer Anthony Donaldson. In the second to last clip, Taika Waititi pretends he hasn't done any rehearsals for his one man show Taika's Incredible Show, which features an alien with ridiculous teeth and Gunther the dancing German. 

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The Living Room - Series One, Episode Eight

2002, Camera - Television

Brought to you from "the Samoan Embassy" (in reality the Naked Samoans' motel room) this episode of The Living Room follows the comedic theatre troupe during their time at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Then it retreats to the wild west coast of the South Island, where acclaimed cinematographer Alun Bollinger reflects on his diverse life and career. Also featured is the first 'proper' exhibition of Illicit artists on K' Road (featuring the late Martin Edmond), and a visit to small town Mangaweka, setting for Michael Reihana's surrealist short film Little Gold Cowboy. 

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The Living Room - Series One, Episode Two

2002, Camera - Television

This early episode from the award-winning arts series drops in on the Urale sisters — directors Sima and Makerita and publicist Maila — in the living room of their Lyall Bay fale. The prolific Samoan-Kiwi siblings visit local haunts, discuss work, and brother Bill (aka King Kapisi) is mentioned in dispatches. Other Kiwi creatives featured include 'nu jazz' practitioner Mark de Clive-Lowe playing at Cargo in London; designer Ross Stevens building his challenging Happy Valley shipping container conversion; and Cannons Creek beatbox king Dougie B breaking it down.

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The Living Room - Series One (excerpts)

2002 - 2003, Camera - Television

A magazine show with an edge, The Living Room did for arts television production what Radio With Pictures did for NZ music — it ripped open the venetian blinds, rearranged the plastic-covered cushions, and shone the sun on Aotearoa’s homegrown creative culture. Often letting the subjects film and present their own stories, it was produced for three series by Wellington’s Sticky Pictures, who also made follow-up arts showcase The Gravy. These excerpts from the first series show a calvacade of local talent, including an early Flight of the Conchords screen outing.