Mike Rehu began his career as a breakfast DJ. After a sidestep into presenting children’s television, he headed overseas. The trip was cut short by an invitation to return to TV, this time on the other side of the camera. After a stint in management for TVNZ in Singapore, he did 16 years running sports for ESPN and Fox. Lured back to be Māori TV's Head of Content, Rehu later moved into sports commentating and radio.

He's a disciplined performer. He's got a fun, warm sort of personality. He just had that x factor — that sparkle on camera. He can communicate directly with an individual through television. Video Dispatch producer Amanda Evans on Mike Rehu, The Listener, 20 August 1990, page 36

Bloopers - Presenters and Props

2018, Presenter - Television

Cameras can be unforgiving — especially when they capture presenters fluffing their lines. In this selection of bloopers from across the decades, we see Hudson and Halls having a minor spat while trying to introduce their show, and some out of control props. Bugs Bunny Show host Fiona Anderson twice knocks over a telescope, while It's in the Bag presenter Nick Tansley looks on as Suzy Clarkson (née Aiken) bends over too far. Mike Rehu reveals the wrong day of the week on Play School, Mai Time's Mike Haru pulls a face, and a car is hit by falling glitter and something heavier.

Legend Fighting Championship

2011, Commentator - Television

The Son of a Gunn Show - Thingee's Eye Pop

1994, Director - Television

The moment Thingee's eye popped out has become a legendary event in Kiwi television history, as an unflappable Jason Gunn continues hosting duties, despite his co-presenter being in a spot of bother. The ocular incident occurred during filming of The Son of a Gunn Show. Although some swear they saw it happen live, the moment did not go to air until weeks after the event — on a nighttime bloopers show. Thingee debuted on After School and appeared in several children's shows, including What Now?. He retired from New Zealand television after returning to his home planet. 

The Son of a Gunn Show

1994, Director - Television

The Son of a Gunn Show was a popular 90s after school links show for kids. It was hosted by the irrepressible Jason Gunn, who wrangled proceedings with the help of alien puppet sidekick Thingee. The energetic show took in everything from song and dance numbers, and educational segments, to spoofs and impressions (often Frank Spencer) as Gunn et al played in loco parentis to a generation of Kiwi kids. Guests included sports and show business celebrities of the day. The show ended when TVNZ moved their children’s production from Christchurch to Wellington.

What Now? - 1992 Christmas Special

1992, Segment Director - Television

Broadcast on Christmas 1992, this epic episode of What Now? was both a festive special, and a best of compilation from the show’s first decade on air. The set gets ever more crowded as a long line of past hosts join current presenters Simon Barnett and Catherine McPherson, and help make the Christmas carols more stirring. Eddie Sunderland and Fifi Colston explain a few arts and crafts, in between showcases of the show's best sketches to date. Hiding somewhere on the set is Mr Claus himself, narrowly avoiding detection. 

What Now?

1992 - 1993, Director - Television

What Now? is a long-running entertainment show for primary school-aged children. Filmed before a live studio audience on weekend mornings, What Now? is a New Zealand TV institution; it was the first TV show to have live phone-ins. The series is known for its challenges that sometimes result in participants being 'gunged'. A roll-call of presenters includes Steve Parr, Danny Watson, Simon Barnett, Jason Gunn, Michelle A'Court, Tamati Coffey, Antonia Prebble, and more. 'Get out of your Lazy Bed' by Matt Bianco is the theme song memorable to generations of Kiwi kids.

The Video Dispatch

1990, Presenter - Television

Long-running afternoon show The Video Dispatch presented current affairs for younger viewers. Legend has it some politicians also used it to get a handle on the news. Topics ranged from poverty to a DIY polytech computer called ‘Poly’. The show's first presenter was Dick Weir, who in 1983 handed the reins to Lloyd Scott (best known at the time as Barry Crump's hapless pal in a series of Toyota ads). Rodney Bryant replaced Scott in 1987. Among the show's many reporters were Michele A'Court, Kerre McIvor (nee Woodham), and Bill Ralston. The title sequence will tickle nostalgia for 80s kids. 

Play School

1985 - 1987, Presenter - Television

Play School was an iconic educational programme for pre-school children, which was first produced in Auckland from 1972, then Dunedin from 1975. The format included songs, a story, craft, a calendar, a clock and a look outside Play School via the shaped windows. But the toys, Big Ted, Little Ted, Jemima, Humpty and Manu, were the real stars of the show. The title sequence ("Here's a house ...") and music were a call to action recognised by generations of Kiwis. Presenters included actors Rawiri Paratene and Theresa Healey, Russell Smith and future MP Jacqui Hay.