The versatile Peter Young began writing and directing at TVNZ's Natural History Unit in 1989. After moving into camerawork, he launched his own company Fisheye Films in 1997. Since then Young has shot images around the world, directed acclaimed passion projects about post-quake Christchurch and the Ross Sea, and helmed TV series showcasing local landscapes and cuisine (Hunger for the WildGet Fresh with Al Brown).

The contribution of sound, music, narration, performance and story creates something far richer than the individual components — and that's the magic of this industry. Peter Young
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Country Calendar - 50 Golden Years

2016, Camera

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The Art of Recovery

2015, Director, Producer, Cinematographer - Film

The Art of Recovery sets out to document "one of the most dynamic, creative and contentious times in the history of Christchurch". Director Peter Young (The Last Ocean) examines a post-quake city where creativity thrives among the rubble: from street art to dance spaces, to the beloved 185 Empty Chairs Memorial. But will the spirit of community and creativity survive the redesign? The Art of Recovery won raves after its 2015 NZ Film Festival premiere at Christchurch's recently restored Isaac Theatre Royal. Stuff reviewer James Croot called the result "kinetic, interesting and inspiring". 

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The Women of Pike River

2015, Cinematography - Television

On 19 November 2010, the first of a number of explosions occured at the Pike River coal mine. Twenty-nine men were left trapped in the tunnel. This documentary explores the lives of six of those left behind, who were wives and mothers of the miners. The disaster was NZ's worst single loss of life since the Erebus crash in 1979 — although it was eclipsed only four months later by the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake. Despite assurances that the survivors would be rescued and the dead retrieved, new owners Solid Energy announced in 2014 that the mine was still too dangerous to re-enter. 

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The Last Ocean

2012, Writer, Camera, Producer, Director - Film

This documentary advocates for the protection of one of the last pristine ecosystems on earth: The Ross Sea. Veteran cameraman Peter Young vividly captures the frozen wilderness — freewheeling penguins, fish and sealions under the aquamarine ice — and interviews scientists concerned at threats posed by commercial fishing (including from New Zealand-owned boats). The film confronts unsuspecting New York diners with the origins of their fish, exposing upmarket ‘Chilean sea bass’ as Antarctic toothfish. Last Ocean won Best Film at the 2013 Reel Earth Film Festival.

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Coasters

2011 - 2012, Camera, Director, Producer

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Get Fresh with Al Brown

2011, Producer, Camera, Director

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Kaitangata Twitch - First Episode

2010, Camera - Television

Kaitangata Twitch follows 12-year-old Meredith, who sees eerie visions as a Governors Bay island is drilled for mining. The Māori Television series was adapted from a Margaret Mahy story by long-time collaborator Yvonne Mackay. Mahy makes a rainbow-wigged cameo in this episode where the locals protest a subdivision, and Meredith apprehends the island's 'twitch'. Newcomer Te Waimarie Kessell stars, with Charles Mesure and George Henare. The mix of the Māori concept of wairua with a willful 21st Century teenage heroine won a Remi Award at Worldfest-Houston 2010.

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Sand Man

2007, Director, Producer, Camera - Television

New Brighton beach in Christchurch: Peter Donnelly is busy creating art, art with a lifespan that can be measured in hours. Using a rake and a piece of wood, Donnelly draws elaborate artworks in the sand - more than 700 of them to date. "I bring something to life, and then its life is over, and at the end of the four hours it wants to go, it's worn out ... it just wants to be gifted, and it goes to the sea." Beautifully shot by director Peter Young, this Artsville documentary captures Donnelly both in action, and musing on the beauty of impermanence.

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Here to Stay - The English

2007, Camera - Television

Actor Michael Hurst began life in northern England, then moved to Christchurch at age eight. In this Here to Stay episode he looks at the pervasive elements of Kiwi culture that derive from mother England — from roasts, rugby, tea and the Mini, to a language and legal system. In this excerpt Hurst fries up fish'n'chips with Ray McVinnie, stalks deer with Davey Hughes, and explores how class ideals travelled south to Mt Peel and Christ's College .... A chorus of Kiwis, including ex-All Blacks' captain David Kirk and historian Jock Phillips, ponder the influence.

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Hunger for the Wild

2006 - 2008, Producer, Director, Camera - Television

Hunger for the Wild took Wellington chefs Al Brown and Steve Logan out of their fine-dining restaurant and into the wilds of Aotearoa on a fishing, foraging and hunting culinary adventure. Putting the local in 'locally sourced' each episode involves Al and Steve splitting up and collecting ingredients (and characters) for an episode-concluding meal; the homegrown and cooked dish is then toasted with a wine selected by Logan. Three series were produced for TVNZ by Fisheye films, winning a 2007 NZ Screen Award and Best Lifestyle Series at the 2009 Qantas Awards.

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Leo's Pride

2006, Camera

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Hunger for the Wild - Series One, Episode Three (Mokihinui River whitebait)

2006, Camera, Producer, Director - Television

This award-winning lifestyle series took Wellington chefs Al Brown and Steve Logan out of their fine-dining restaurant kitchen on a mission to put the local in 'locally sourced' kai. In this series one episode it's wild food on a wild river: whitebaiting on the Mokihinui. Brownie gets a primo 'stand' and coaster advice; and Steve gets some Green Fern lager and meets a DoC ranger who tells the whitebait's perilous life story and nets a grown-up: a kokopu. Then it's riverside fritters with beurre blanc sauce and asparagus, washed down with a glass of pinot gris.

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Hunger for the Wild - Series One, Episode Two (Whanganui River wild pig)

2006, Producer, Director, Camera - Television

This award-winning series took Wellington chefs Al Brown and Steve Logan out of their fine-dining restaurant on a mission to experience the local in 'locally sourced' kai. In this episode Al and Steve head to Tangahoe, up the Whanganui River, looking for wild pig with a couple of good keen men — Baldy and Moon. Logie's with the dogs on the boar hunt; while Al's on veges at the markets, before hitching a flying fox ride to sample some freshly baked organic kumara bread en route up river. The bush tucker result? Cider braised pork belly with kumara and corn mash.

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Distinctly Grahame Sydney

2006, Camera - Television

Painter Grahame Sydney has been pigeonholed by some as a landscape artist, but this doumentary contends that his evocative depictions of his Central Otago surroundings are much more than just exercises in realism. Fellow locals, poet Brian Turner and actor Sam Neill discuss the emotional and artistic resonance his work holds for them. Sydney's portraits and figure studies are also examined. The production of one of his lithographs is followed from inception — as a sketch on a slab of Bavarian limestone brought to NZ over 200 years ago — to fully fledged print.

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40 Years of Country Calendar

2005, Camera - Television

This best of special culls history and highlights from 40 seasons of the longest running show on NZ television. Farming, forestry and fishing are all on the roster, but this edition is as much about observing people and the land. There is footage of high country musters, helicopter deer capture, floods and blizzards, as well as radio-controlled dogs and mice farmers. Longtime Country Calendar figures like John Gordon and Tony Trotter share their memories, and the show sets out to catch up again with some of the colourful New Zealanders that have featured on screen.

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Between the Lines: Denis Glover 1912-1980

2005, Camera - Television

Denis Glover's poems are some of the most enduring in our literary tradition. "And Quardle oodle ardle wardle doodle" from The Magpies is probably New Zealand poetry's best known line. Glover (1912-1980) also established the first independent literary press (The Caxton Press). This documentary, directed by Bill de Friez, takes a candid look at the poet and reveals a larger than life figure ("a great drinker, a great womaniser, a great poet") connected to all the literary personalities of his day. 

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Monsters of the Deep

2005, Camera

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Frontseat

2006, Camera - Television

With five series and close to 100 episodes, Frontseat, produced by The Gibson Group, was the longest-running arts programme of its time. Billed by TVNZ publicity as a "topical and provocative weekly arts series investigating the issues facing local arts and culture", and hosted by actor Oliver Driver, it (sometimes controversially) took a broad current affairs approach to the arts of the day, covering "all the big events, reporting the stories, and interviewing the personalities."

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Africa Overland

2004, Camera, Field Director

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Explorers

2004, Camera

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Frontseat - Series One, Episode 14

2004, Field Crew - Television

In this early, Edinburgh-centric episode of arts show Frontseat, Flight of the Conchords return to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival for a sellout third season — although they argue the new show is “a shambles”. Also present at the fest are an array of Kiwi technicians, performers, and arts programmers. Meanwhile in his Marlborough vineyard, globetrotting cinematographer Michael Seresin critiques Kiwi society and its ugly towns, and calls NZ a “lonely, soulless sort of nation”. Also on offer: Artist Phil Dadson in Antarctica, and award-winning dancer Ross McCormack.

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Made in New Zealand - Margaret Mahy

2004, Camera - Television

Made in New Zealand is a documentary about acclaimed New Zealand children and young adults writer Margaret Mahy. The film takes a line from her award-winning story The Changeover — "...made in New Zealand, it said, Wisdom Laboratories, Paraparaumu" — and uses it to talk about the importance of New Zealand settings in Mahy's work, her international successes, and her life as a writer. Mahy is filmed at her home in Governors Bay, speaking to children in her famous rainbow wig, and out and about on Akaroa Peninsula.

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Real Dads Revealed

2002, Camera

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Ghosts of Gondwana

2001, Camera - Television

Long isolated, New Zealand contains a world of Alice Through the Looking Glass natural oddities: birds, insects and plants like nowhere else. Scientist Jared Diamond remarked "it is the nearest approach to life on another planet". Palaeontology (from Professor Michael Archer) and Māori myth (told by Hirini Melbourne) reveal these 'Ghosts of Gondwana'. Then cutting edge camera techniques (earning a Merit Award at 2002 International Wildlife Film Festival) delve into a night world of bat-filled tree trunk saunas, “demon grasshopper” weta, and furry kiwi with chopstick bills.

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Chasing Giants: On the Trail of the Giant Squid

2001, Camera, Director, Producer

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The Blue Planet

2000, Camera

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Backch@t

Field Director - Television

Backch@t was a magazine-style arts and culture show that appealed, from the opening acid-jazz theme tune, to a literate late-90s arts audience. Fronted by media personality Bill Ralston, the show included reporters Mark Crysell and Jodi Ihaka, and Chris Knox appears as the weekly film reviewer. In keeping with Ralston’s journalistic background, Backch@t took a ‘news’ approach to the arts, debating topics in the studio and interviewing the personalities, as well as covering the sector stories.

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Mitre 10 Changing Rooms

1998, Camera

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The Watcher

1997, Director

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Mel's Amazing Movies

1993 - 1996, Camera

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Wildtrack - Mount Cook National Park

1991, Director - Television

Wildtrack was a long-running series that infected a generation of kids who grew up in the 80s and early 90s with enthusiasm for all-things native’n’natural. This 1991 Taylormade episode (neon-lit as ‘Wild T’) explores the mountain life of Aoraki-Mt Cook: from Māori myth, to cheeky kea and solar-powered butterflies. Peter Hayden presents from the studio with a homegrown HAL: Archie the computer. Future actor/director Katie Wolfe is the young cub in field: glacier-skiing, hanging from a crevasse, meeting Mt Cook School’s eight pupils, and hugging vegetable sheep.

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Wildtrack - From Mountains to Sea Floor

1990, Field Director - Television

Wildtrack was a highly successful nature series for children, running from 1981 through several series to the early 90s. In this episode the presenters check out “dung fungi” in cow pats and walking-on-water-insects (pond skaters) in the studio, and head outside to check out kea alpine parrots who are “too friendly for their own good” (threatened by smuggling and over eager tourists); the West Coast’s black sand beaches; Fiordland’s underwater world; and selective plant breeding that involves washing a bee.

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3 News

1993 - 1997, Camera - Television

Independent channel TV3 kicked off on 26 November 1989. The flagship 6pm bulletin — originally 3 National News — was first anchored by ex TVNZ news man Philip Sherry, with Greg Clark filling the sports chair. Sherry was replaced by Joanna Paul, then another former TVNZ anchor, John Hawkesby. A 1998 revamp saw Carol Hirschfeld and John Campbell take up the new dual anchor roles. Their move to current affairs show Campbell Live in 2005 ushered in duo Hilary Barry and Mike McRoberts. In 2016 Mediaworks' rebranded its news service — and the slot — as Newshub.  

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The Ugly Punkling

1989, Camera

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Wildtrack

1989 - 1991, Camera, Director - Television

Wildtrack was a highly successful nature series for children, combining a Dunedin studio set with reporting from the field. Produced by TVNZ’s Natural History Unit, it ran from 1981 through several series to the early 90s. Producer Michael Stedman sought to produce a series where “children can be excited and entertained with genuine information, while not neglecting adults”. Wildtrack won the Feltex Television Award for the best children's programme three years running (1982 - 1984).  

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Country Calendar

1997 - , Camera - Television

The iconic all-things-rural show is the longest running programme on New Zealand television. With its typical patient observational style (that allows stories of people and the land to gently unfold) it’s an unlikely broadcasting star, but New Zealanders continue, after 50 plus years, to tune in. Amongst the bucolic tales of farming, fishing and forestry, there are high country musters, floods, organic brewing, falconry, tobacco farming, as well as a fencing wire-playing farmer-musician, a radio-controlled dog, and Fred Dagg and the Trevs.