Rangi Rangitukunoa has a background in performing, kapa haka and theatre — he has shared stages with Te Waka Huia, Mika, and Moana and the Tribe. His screen credits include acting roles (indie comedy Crackheads) and presenting Māori Television motoring show Meke My Waka. Behind the scenes work as a cameraman led to a run of directing gigs on Māori TV programmes, from preschool to talk shows, to setting the tone for The Stage - Haka Fusion, as director of the first episode. In 2016 he created and directed Māori warrior series Kairākau, which dramatises legendary stories and skills from the past.

As Māori, we should stand proud in telling our stories. Some people might think this programme is just about fighting, but actually it's also about our ancestors and bringing their stories back to life. Rangi Rangitukunoa on his TV series Kairākau, in a March 2016 interview with Māori Television
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The Dance Exponents - Why Does Love?

2016, As: Tommy Clark - Television

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Kairākau

2016, As: Hotu, Series Creator, Director, Editor, Associate Producer - Television

This 2016 Māori Television series mixes history and the action stylings of 300, The Dead Lands and kung fu movies, to dramatise pre-Pākehā Māori martial arts and those who practised them. As the publicity put it: "ancient heroes of yesteryear, re-discovered, re-examined and re-imagined". The anthology series was created by Rangi Rangitukunoa, and choreographed by kapa haka champ Wetini Mitai-Ngātai. Nine 30-minute episodes were made. Kairākau was praised by Duncan Grieve on website The Spinoff, for evoking "a pre-colonial New Zealand in a convincing and evocative style."

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The Shannara Chronicles

2016 - ongoing, As: Rover - Television

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Kairākau - First Episode

2016, Series Creator, Director, Editor, Associate Producer - Television

Te Ao Māori meets 70s kung fu movies in this Māori TV series, as a modern guide travels back to pre-Pākehā times to introduce "the greatest warriors of the past". Kairākau uses modern filmmaking tools (including roving camerawork, and the kinetic style of action films like 300) to explore ancestral history and showcase Māori martial arts. This first episode tells of Tunohopu’s utu, after an ambush by a Tūwharetoa war party sees the capture of his son and brother. Kairākau was created by Rangi Rangitukunoa. Kapa haka expert Wetini Mitai-Ngātai choreographs the martial arts.

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The Stage - Haka Fusion - First Episode

2016, Director, Camera Operator - Television

Television talent show franchises like Got Talent and X Factor won huge global popularity in the first two decades of the 21st Century. In 2016 the format got an Aotearoa twist with this Māori Television series: each contestant’s routine had to include kapa haka. Hosted by Kimo Houltham, this first episode sees Norris Studios (jazz ballet), Mana Wairua (contemporary), and Sovreign (hip hop) compete to see who has "haka flair". Manu Wairua’s World War II-inspired act and Sovreign’s rākau (Māori weaponry) skills saw the judges send them to the quarter finals.

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Crackheads

2013, As: Shane - Film

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Mana Mamau

2011, Director - Television

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Ō Whakaaro

2010 - 2013, Director - Television

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Kupahuna Taiāwhio

2009, Camera - Television

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Tōko Reo

2009, Camera - Television

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Kei Roto Kei Waho

2009, Camera - Television

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Pūkoro

2009 - ongoing, Director - Television

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Meke My Waka

2006 - 2010, Presenter - Television

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Shortland Street

2009 - 2011, As: Various roles - Television

Shortland Street is a fast-paced serial drama set in an inner city Auckland hospital. The long-running South Pacific Pictures production is based around the births, deaths and marriages of the hospital's staff and patients. It screens on TVNZ’s TV2 network five days a week. In 2017 the show was set to celebrate its 25th anniversary, making it New Zealand’s longest running drama by far. Characters and lines from the show have entered the culture — starting with “you’re not in Guatemala now, Dr Ropata!” in the very first episode. Mihi Murray writes about Shortland Street here.

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Marae

2004, Subject - Television

Marae is the longest running Māori current affairs programme. First broadcast in 1992, the magazine programme aims to keep its audience in touch with the issues, political or otherwise, that affect Māori, and explain kaupapa Māori from a Māori perspective. The Marae Digipoll gives the programme publicity in other media as a respected barometer of matters Māori. Marae was re-launched in October 2010 as Marae Investigates, presented by Scotty Morrison and Jodi Ihaka Marae. It screens on TV One, and is presented half in english and half in te reo Māori.