Journalist, director and producer Rob Harley has won many awards in a career spanning four decades. He was a high profile investigative reporter on TVNZ’s flagship news and current affairs shows Frontline, Assignment and Sunday from 1990 to 2003, before moving into independent programme making. 

...television is where most people get their daily fix of information from. Television has a way to actually bring it to life, and you actually get to look into the eyes of another moving breathing human being, and hear their pain and hear their story. Rob Harley, on website Like Minds, Like Mine

Keeping up with the Kaimanawas

2014, Producer

Survivors Guide to Hell

2014, Subject, Director - Television

The Orphan Lady

2013, Camera, Producer

Broken Promises, Broken Brides

2011, Camera, Director, Producer

Bringing My Brother Back to Life

2010, Producer

The Killing of Sophie Elliott

2009, Director, Producer

The Worst That Could Happen

2009, Director, Producer

Chasing the Ghost

2009, Director, Producer - Television

Someone, Somewhere, Loves Me

2008, Camera, Director, Producer

Under Investigation: NZ Medical Mysteries

2008, Presenter, Director

Asia Downunder - Series 13, Episode 17

2006, Director - Television

This Asia Downunder programme explores a sensitive subject for the Asian community: problem gambling. Street Talk takes the issue to the people, to canvas a range of views. Charlie ASH guitarist Mailee Mathews is profiled, as is comedian Jerome Chandrahasen. Asian films in the Film Festival are reviewed, and in the kitchen it's chicken with dried fenugreek leaves. Finally in a touching tribute, Malaysian-born actor Yvonne Tan is interviewed during her final battle with a brain tumour.

Sunday

2002 - 2003, Reporter - Television

Screening each weekend after TV One's primetime news, Sunday mixes New Zealand stories with reports from overseas. The local contributions have ranged from celebrity interviews, to reports that took months to put together (including award-winning pieces on the 2008 Chinese poisoned milk scandal, and how patients were treated at Porirua Hospital). Over the years, Sunday's roster of journalists has included veterans John Hudson, Janet McIntyre, Ian Sinclair, and current presenter Miriama Kamo. The show has played in both hour and half-hour formats.   

Ordinary Heroes

2001, Presenter, Camera, Reporter

Extreme Close Up

1997-1990, Presenter, Producer

Assignment

1995 - 2002, Reporter - Television

Hour-long prime time current affairs slot Assignment replaced TVNZ's long-running Frontline in 1995, after Frontline had won controversy for a couple of its stories. A number of Frontline veterans moved across to the new series, including Susan Wood, Rod Vaughan, and Rob Harley. Vaughan and Harley would both win local media awards for their Assignment investigations. At the 1996 TV Guide New Zealand Film and Television Awards, Assignment was judged Best News and Current Affairs Programme. 

Frontline - The Wahine Disaster 25 Years on

1993, Reporter: 'The Fatal Shore' - Television

This special report from late 80s/early 90s current affairs show Frontline looks at the Wahine disaster, on its 25th anniversary. Fifty-one people died on 10 April 1968 after the interisland ferry struck Barrett Reef near Wellington, in a huge storm. The first part ('From Reef to Ruin') features archive footage and interviews with survivors and rescuers. In the second part ('Fatal Shores'), reporter Rob Harley examines whether the ferry could have been better equipped, and more lives saved. A third part ('Strait Answers') is not shown here due to copyright issues with some of the footage. 

Frontline

1990-1994, Reporter - Television

Frontline replaced Close Up as TVNZ’s flagship, primetime current affairs show in 1988. Fronted by Ross Stevens, and made at Avalon at a time when TVNZ management had relocated to Auckland, it produced the controversial 1990 doco For the Public Good which explored the relationship between business and the Labour Government. In the fallout, TVNZ was sued, staff were sacked and the office moved to Auckland. In 1994, a special about the Winebox tax allegations saw Frontline back in the news. Other presenters included Lindsay Perigo, Anita McNaught and Susan Wood. 

Eyewitness News

1982 - 1989, Reporter - Television

The nightly Eyewitness News debuted in 1982 having evolved out of TV2’s twice weekly current affairs show of the same name. Screening at 9.30pm, it moved to TV One before being axed in 1990 in favour of a later One News bulletin. Two of the key moments in the political turmoil of 1984 played out in front of its cameras — PM Robert Muldoon’s calling of the snap election and his devaluation interview which sparked an economic and constitutional crisis. Reporter Rod Vaughan also received his infamous bloody nose from Bob Jones while on an Eyewitness story.