Veteran wildlife cameraman Robert Brown has filmed everything from polar bears to pukeko in places from the Arctic to the Antarctic. He shot the rare bird stories that led to the formation of state television's Natural History Unit (later NHNZ), and contributed to classic BBC David Attenborough series, such as Life on Earth and The Living Planet. In 1981 he won a Feltex Award for his work on Wild South. 

I have worked with Robert over the last 20 years on projects such as The Living Planet, The Trials Of Life and The Life Of Birds, and have come to greatly admire his enthusiasm, temperament and specialist wildlife camera skills. Sir David Attenborough
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New Zealand Sanctuary Keepers

2004, Camera - Television

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Eating the Future

2001, Camera - Television

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Nomads of the Wind

2001, Camera - Television

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Dolphins of the Shadowland

1998, Camera - Television

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The Life of Birds

1998, Camera - Television

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Killers I Have Known

1998, Camera - Television

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Endless Summer

1992, Camera - Television

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Realms of the Russian Bear

1992, Camera - Television

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Goes North

1990, Camera - Television

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Grandma

1990, Camera - Television

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Trials of Life

1990, Camera - Television

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Dune

1989, Camera - Television

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In the National Interest - The High Country

1989, Camera - Television

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Pukeko

1989, Camera - Television

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Frontline

1988 - 1994, Camera - Television

Frontline replaced Close Up as TVNZ’s flagship, primetime current affairs show in 1988. Fronted by Ross Stevens, and made at Avalon at a time when TVNZ management had relocated to Auckland, it produced the controversial 1990 doco For the Public Good which explored the relationship between business and the Labour Government. In the fallout, TVNZ was sued, staff were sacked and the office moved to Auckland. In 1994, a special about the Winebox tax allegations saw Frontline back in the news. Other presenters included Lindsay Perigo, Anita McNaught and Susan Wood. 

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Icebird

1987, Camera - Television

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Land of Kiwi

1987, Camera - Television

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Land of the Kiwi

1987, Camera - Television

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Wrybill - Bird with a Bent

1987, Camera - Television

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Albatross Watch

1987, Camera - Television

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Journeys in National Parks: Tongariro te Maunga

1987, Camera - Television

In this five-part series, presenter Peter Hayden travels through some of New Zealand’s most awe-inspiring landscapes. The series was made to coincide with the centennial of the establishment of Tongariro, Aotearoa’s first national park (and the fourth worldwide). Hayden traverses the famous Tongariro Crossing with priest Max Mariu, volcanologist Jim Cole, park ranger Russell Montgomery, and the young Tumu Te Heu Heu. It was the first time Tumu, later paramount chief of Ngāti Tuwharetoa, had been up the maunga; the power of his experience is clear and moving.

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Journeys in National Parks: Westland / Aoraki

1987, Camera - Television

In this episode of the Journeys series, Peter Hayden travels west to east across two national parks and some of New Zealand's most sublime landscapes: from giant, ancient kahikatea forest to hotpools and creaking glaciers. Reflections by ecologist Geoff Park (author of Ngā Uruora) on the coast-to-mountains forest, and the exploits of early surveyor Charlie 'Explorer' Douglas are woven through Hayden's journey, ending with Hayden's personal highlight of the series: climbing Hochstetter Dome with the legendary mountaineer (and Edmund Hillary mentor) Harry Ayres.  

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Colony Z

1986, Camera - Television

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Southern Harbour

1986, Camera - Television

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World Safari (BBC)

1986, Camera - Television

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South Georgia

1985, Camera - Television

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Journeys Across Latitude 45 South (part four) - Atawhenua Shadowland

1985, Camera - Television

This final installment of Hayden’s traverse across latitude 45 finds him in the ice-sculpted isolation of Fiordland. In this episode he travels through diverse flora (lush and verdant thanks to astonishingly high rainfall); and with botanist Dr Brian Molloy follows the footsteps of early bird conservationist Richard Henry. Mohua (yellowhead), takahe, weka and tiny rock wrens feature in the fauna camp. Reaching the sea, the underworld depths of George Sound house a world teeming with abundant life.

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Journeys Across Latitude 45 South (part three) - Old Gold New Gold

1985, Camera - Television

This third episode in presenter Peter Hayden’s journey across latitude 45 depicts the “new gold” of the booming tourist trade. On the Clutha River, archaeologists race ahead of the construction of a dam, digging for a soon-to-be-submerged mining past. The road to Skippers Canyon induces vertigo. Hayden rafts through the Oxenbridge brothers’ tunnelling feat, a failed project aimed at diverting the Shotover River in the hope of finding gold on the exposed bed. Alan Brady is filmed in his newly-established winery, the first in a region now famed for its wine.

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Snares: Gift of the Sea

1984, Camera - Television

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The Living Planet

1984, Camera

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Birds of Paradox

1983, Camera - Television

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As It Wasn't In the Beginning

1982, Camera - Television

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Kākāpō - Night Parrot

1982, Camera - Television

Flightless and nocturnal, the kākāpō is the world's heaviest parrot. By the 1970s the mysterious, moss-coloured bird was facing extinction, "evicted" to Fiordland mountains and Stewart Island by stoats and cats. Thanks to special night vision equipment, this documentary captured for the first time the bird's idiosyncratic courtship rituals, and the first chick found in a century. Marking the directing debut of NHNZ veteran Rod Morris, the film screened on series two of Wild South. It was a runner-up for Best Film at a major international wildlife festival in the US city of Missoula.

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Same Time Same Place

1982, Camera - Television

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Sealion Summer

1982, Camera - Television

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Eyewitness News

1982 - 1989, Camera - Television

The nightly Eyewitness News debuted in 1982 having evolved out of TV2’s twice weekly current affairs show of the same name. Screening at 9.30pm, it moved to TV One before being axed in 1990 in favour of a later One News bulletin. Two of the key moments in the political turmoil of 1984 played out in front of its cameras — PM Robert Muldoon’s calling of the snap election and his devaluation interview which sparked an economic and constitutional crisis. Reporter Rod Vaughan also received his infamous bloody nose from Bob Jones while on an Eyewitness story.

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Island of Strange Noises

1981, Camera - Television

The remote Antipodes Islands lie 860 kilometres southeast of Stewart Island. This 1980 documentary follows a Wildlife Service team surveying the islands’ inhabitants who are making all the strange noises – fur seals, albatrosses, petrels, parakeets and snipe, elephant seals and prolific penguins. It also investigates threats to their survival: mice and overfishing in the southern ocean. Winner of a Silver Medal at New York's International Film and Television Festival, this early Wild South episode helped establish the reputation of TVNZ’s Natural History Unit (later NHNZ).

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Project Takahē

1981, Camera - Television

When the takahē was rediscovered in the Murchison mountains in 1948, it made world headlines as a back from extinction story. This documentary checks in on the big flightless birds three decades later, with their future under threat (by deer, stoats and breeding failure). Doctor Geoffrey Orbell recalls the 1948 expedition. Project Takahē was the first Wild South documentary made by TVNZ’s Natural History Unit (later NHNZ). The images of takahē – blue, green and red, plodding in the snowy tussock – marked the first time most New Zealanders had seen the bird in the wild.    

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Living Together

1980, Camera - Television

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The World Around Us (Australia)

1979 - 2006, Camera - Television

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Hidden Places

1978, Camera - Television

This six-part series about Aotearoa's flora and fauna marked the first set of documentaries to be made by the BCNZ's freshly born Natural History Unit. The 15 minute episodes showcase White Island, bird life in Ōkārito, the flightless takahē, Waipoua Forest in Northland, wetlands near Dunedin and winter wildlife in Central Otago. Many of the filmmakers went on to make a mark — including directors Neil Harraway and Robin Scholes, and cameraman Robert Brown (The Living Planet). Hidden Places - Ōkārito was named Best Documentary at the 1979 Feltex Television Awards.

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Hidden Places: Father of the Forest

1978, Camera - Television

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Hidden Places: Horrie Sinclair's Swamp

1978, Camera - Television

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Hidden Places: Ōkārito

1978, Camera - Television

Award-winner Hidden Places: Ōkārito marked an early milestone for the Natural History Unit (later to become NHNZ) — it was part of the first series made by the unit. The 15 minute episode follows birds, such as white heron, Russian godwits and royal spoonbills, all of them flocking to Ōkārito's "unique world of sea, lagoon, rivers and forests". Logging of kahikatea, the tallest endemic forest tree, also features. Robin Scholes, later to produce movie Once Were Warriors, wrote and directed this episode. It won Best Documentary at the 1979 Feltex Television Awards.

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Hidden Places: Takahē

1978, Camera - Television

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Red Deer

1977, Camera - Television

Introduced to New Zealand in 1851, red deer soon became controversial residents: sport for hunters, but despised by farmers and conservationists for the damage they caused. First targeted by government cullers in the 1930s, by the 60s they were shot by commercial operators for venison export. Directed by Bruce Morrison and Keith Hunter, this award-winning documentary catches up with the hunt in the 70s, when deer for farming – dramatically caught alive, from helicopters – was a multi-million dollar gold rush. Different versions of the film were made for overseas markets.

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Wildlife on One

1977 - 2005, Camera - Television

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The Edge of Extinction

1976, Camera - Television

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Saddleback

1976, Camera - Short Film

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Kaleidoscope

1976 - 1989, Camera - Television

Kaleidoscope was a magazine-style arts series which ran from 30 July 1976 until 1989. Running for many years in a 90 minute format, the show tried varied approaches over its run, from an initial mix of local and international items — including live performances — to episodes which focused on a single artist or topic. In the early 80s Kaleidoscope collected three Feltex awards for Speciality Programme. Hosts over the years included initial presenter Jeremy Payne, newsreader Angela D'Audney, future Auckland music professor Heath Lees, and Warratahs fiddler Nic Brown.

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TV One News

1975 - present, Camera - Television

In 1975 TV One launched with a flagship 6.30 news bulletin which went largely unchanged with the move to TVNZ in 1980. In a 1987 revamp, it became the Network News with dual newsreaders Judy Bailey and Neil Billington (replaced by Richard Long). In 1988, the half hour programme moved to 6pm. With the advent of TV3 in late 1989, it was rebranded One Network News; and, from 1995, extended to an hour. The ill-fated replacing of Long with John Hawkesby in 1999 saw it make headlines rather than report them. In 1999, there was another name change to One News.

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Spot On

1973 - 1988, Camera - Television

Spot On was an award-winning education-focused magazine programme for children. Presenters who got their break on the popular series include Ian Taylor, Danny Watson, Phil Keoghan and Ole Maiava. Keoghan went on to international fame as host of The Amazing Race; Taylor now heads up Taylormade Productions and Animation Research Ltd. Janine Morrell directed on the show, and producer Michael Stedman later became head of the Natural History Unit. Peter Jackson, Robert Sarkies and Paul Middleditch all entered the show’s annual ‘Young Filmmaker’ competition.