AM Radio

Lucid 3, Music Video, 2004

An ode to the retrospective joys of listening to AM radio from this Auckland three-piece who mix elements of folk, funk and blues on this smooth pop song written by front person Victoria Girling-Butcher. Richard Bell’s video was shot at the train station at Ferrymead Heritage Park in Christchurch; and his army of loners emerging out of the shadows - drawn in by the music on the radio - underlines the song’s promise of finding companionship from the airwaves. (The Wave Master valve radio was made from the early 1940s by Dunedin company Radio Services Ltd.)

Hitchcock

The Phoenix Foundation, Music Video, 2005

From The Phoenix Foundation’s second album Pegasus, ‘Hitchcock’ is an eerie “electro noir” instrumental tribute to the great film director. Reuben Sutherland’s remarkable clip (which he shot, directed, animated and edited) features a choreographed army of Russian Lada cars — created out of images shot with a stills camera and layered 90 times. What follows is a surreal, conservation-themed revisiting of the Cold War as the electric powered Ladas of the ‘Petrol Crimes Bureau’ are pitted against a gas guzzling 4x4 (bedecked with the Stars and Stripes).

Stop, Drop & Roll

Mareko, Music Video, 2003

Prolific music video director Sophie Findlay offers a humourous take on all those army film and TV shows (Full Metal Jacket, Tigerland et al) with the bad-arse drill sergeant and badgered recruits. Commanding Officer Mareko barks orders to the beat to his troops, The Deceptikonz.

Models

The Fanatics, Music Video, 2004

The darkly arresting imagery of this Fanatics video — featuring leather clad models marching in robotic unison — was almost not to be, according to director Mark Albiston. "The band said 'do what you want — but no models'. I said 'what if we put them in jars'? They said...'mmmm... ok'." This swift negotiation lead to an industrial setting (the generator room under Wellington Hospital), with an army of models being baptised, energised and commercialised. The song was later used as the opening theme for New Zealand's Next Top Model.

The Heater

The Mutton Birds, Music Video, 1994

This highly charged tale of a domestic appliance with a mind of its own marked The Mutton Birds’ only number one hit. The slightly sinister video — the band’s fourth with director Fane Flaws — hints at Don McGlashan’s time with The Front Lawn. A furtive McGlashan takes the lead, with Elizabeth McRae (then known for playing Marj on Shortland Street) as his mother. The other Mutton Birds have cameo roles: seedy second-hand dealer (David Long) and Salvation Army brass section (Ross Burge and Alan Gregg). Max TV viewers voted the result their favourite video of the year.