Faster Hooves

Head Like A Hole, Music Video, 1994

Released on an EP ahead of their second album Flik Y’Self Off Y’Self, the promo for 'Faster Hooves' showed that while Head Like A Hole had distilled the industrial-thrash of their grimy origins into a hookier, more polished sound, the band had lost none of their piss-taking humour. With the rocky outcrops of Wellington's Island Bay filling in for the Wild West, singer Nigel 'Booga' Beazley teeters precariously on a helpless donkey, in pursuit of villainous drummer Mark 'Hidee Beast' Hamill. Meanwhile the rest of band hang on nooses next to a boiling campfire pot of Wattie's finest.

Glorafilia

Zed, Music Video, 1999

Zed was part of a wave of turn of the century Kiwi guitar bands that found chart success and popular followings. This old school Kiwi pop-rock tune finds music video interpretation via director Scott Cleator (who also envisioned Zed songs ‘Oh! Daisy’ and ‘I’m Cold’). Glorafilia keeps Ben from Zed waiting in the morning, tying ribbons in her white girl dreads (it’s a South Island thing), before science lab shenanigans, cruising in a convertible, Corsair Bay beach volleyball, fireplace bongos, Tintin t-shirts, nose-piercings and other relics from a 90s teen crush.

Electric Dream

Shapeshifter, Music Video, 2006

Mark Trethewey’s video for Shapeshifter’s anthemic ‘Electric Dreams’ follows the band as they make their way by bus down the East Coast of the North Island to a typically storming performance at Rhythm and Vines in Gisborne. Along the way, there’s time for summertime staples like beach cricket and fishing off the jetty at Tolaga Bay. These quiet, largely empty spaces provide a marked contrast to the mayhem of the sold out festival. It’s a journey that echoes the summer holiday car trips that are a rite of many an Aotearoa childhood.

Culture?

The Knobz, Music Video, 1980

In the tradition of novelty songs, ‘Culture?’ was catchy to the point of contagion. Fuelled by carnival keyboards, it was The Knobz response to Prime Minister Rob Muldoon’s refusal to lift a 40% sales tax on recorded music (originally instituted by Labour in 1975), and Muldoon's typically blunt verdict on the cultural merits of pop music (“horrible”). The giddy, hyperactive video comes complete with Muldoon impersonator (Danny Faye), and casts the band as the song’s 'Beehive Boys'. In the backgrounder, Mike Alexander writes about his time as the band's manager.