Bad Note for a Heart

Straitjacket Fits, Music Video, 1990

Filmed at Bethells Beach and in a tunnel somewhere in the Auckland suburb of Ellerslie, this award-winning video from future Whale Rider director Niki Caro traces a sea nymph, a beating heart and an elderly gentleman's struggle with his hat. Clearly reluctant to move into the 90s, the eternally rock Shayne Carter looks splendid in dark eye shadow — a look he later told RipItUp was "definitely a low point in rock". Bad Note for a Heart was judged best music video at the 1990 New Zealand Music Awards.

Don't Worry Bout It

Kings, Music Video, 2015

The video for the highest selling Kiwi song of both 2016 and 2017 was shot on a mobile phone in Fiji. Featuring beaches, pools, and partying, Don’t Worry Bout It was filmed by Auckland musician Kings while he was in Fiji for a music festival. Kings wanted to create an instrumental track with a summer feel, but added lyrics after watching his daughter run around a park without a care in the world. As of December 2017, 'Don’t Worry Bout It' held the record for the longest number of weeks (33) as the week's biggest-selling Kiwi single; it had been streamed on Spotify over six million times.

If I Had My Way

Supergroove, Music Video, 1996

This single from Supergroove’s second album Backspacer (1996) reached number seven in the charts, and captures the band's shift from funk to rock after the exit of rapper Che Fu and trumpeter Tim Stewart. The lyrics ask "who would you kill?". Via madcap music video logic, they’re channeled into a fictional TV show, an exercise equipment promo, a pigsty, ice-skating rink, and a burning piano on a beach. The results won Best Video at New Zealand's local music award ceremony in 1997. Bassist Joe Lonie and cinematographer Sigi Spath had won it the previous year, for 'You Gotta Know'.

Save My Life

Bike, Music Video, 1996

In 1992 songwriter and guitarist Andrew Brough left Straitjacket Fits, determined to perform his own brand of "f***ing uplifting pop music". Three years later he formed Bike with drummer Karl Buckley and bassist Tristan Mason. Debut single 'Save My Life' was a finalist in the APRA Silver Scrolls. Brough was a fan of sunny, West Coast guitar jangle and 'Save My Life' has a bob each way: guitars chime, while a morbid lyric ('Don't you try and save my life /cos' I'm already dead') floats overhead. Director Mark Tierney chooses a dreamy palette which combines orange with monochrome.

Suddenly Strange

Bic Runga, Music Video, 1997

This single, one of a number from Bic Runga's debut album Drive, is about calling time on a relationship. Runga's bittersweet lyric is a declaration of independence that never quite manages to be unequivocal. Nominated for Best Video at the 1998 New Zealand Music Awards, the stylishly colourful clip finds her inhabiting a cube in varied Auckland locations — enclosed while life goes on around her, at least until the hopeful final shot. Director and graphic designer Wayne Conway was also nominated for his covers to albums Twist (Dave Dobbyn) and Broadcast (Strawpeople).

Welcome to My World

Bike, Music Video, 1997

This video for Andrew Brough's band Bike features the group playing in a moving caravan, which is being driven by a frazzled father (Topless Women Talk about their Lives actor Ian Hughes). Says director Jonathan King: "I had a vision of Shayne Carter in mirror shades playing a policeman. He agreed on the condition he wouldn't shave his mo. Of course it just added to the moment. Ian Hughes brought his new puppy, Olive, along because he had no one to look after it, so we integrated it into the action. In fact much of the fun stuff he does was him just improvising on the day."

Māori Boy

JGeek and The Geeks, Music Video, 2012

In a Mika-inspired cross cultural collision, this Māori music and comedy group blends traditional Māoritanga with the metrosexual world of fashion and beauty. Founded by former C4 presenter Jermaine Leef in 2010, they launched with this video which debuted on YouTube and received 100,000 views in 10 days. From Queen Street to the beach and bush, their appearance moves from Outkast-inspired nerd chic to a style best described as high camp haka; and boy band posturing mixes with lyrics tackling what it means to be a modern 'Māori boy' (“I play my Nintendo everyday”).

Rumba

The L.E.D.s, Music Video, 2006

Winner of Best Video at the Undertheradar 2007 People's Choice Music Awards, the clip could be seen as director Daniel Batkin-Smith's subtle nod to early Flying Nun work (featuring bike riding, a cat, kitchen-ware, walking on a beach and a baby.)   "We liked Dan so much we asked him to join the band after he shot the clip. And he did! I was reminded how much more fun it is to ride a bike without a helmet. I really miss that." Blair Parkes - March 09 

Sitting Inside My Head

Supergroove, Music Video, 1994

Shot in alternating colour and moody black and white, this is a straightforward music video: cutting together a wahine washing her hair in a basin, with the band performing on a garbage strewn wasteland, slo-mo strolling along a city street, and singer Che Fu (Chicago White Sox cap and duffle coat) wandering a wintry North Shore beach. Director and band member Joe Lonie captures lively performances from the band's multiple members, to help bring the clip to life.

(Glad I'm) Not a Kennedy

Shona Laing, Music Video, 1987

Initially avoided by New Zealand radio stations — who in the same period, showed as little interest in playlisting Crowded House classic 'Don't Dream It's Over' — this became Shona Laing's biggest international single, in a career notable for stylistic change. '(Glad I'm) Not a Kennedy' got to number two in NZ, and number 14 in the US rock charts. Here, the acoustic songbird of 1905 is recast as serious synth-pop singer, in a clip which mixes native beaches, brutalist architecture and poignant archival footage of the ill-fated US president.