Asian Paradise

Sharon O'Neill, Music Video, 1980

Nostalgia can take many forms: and certainly many a middle-aged memory swirls back to this early Sharon O’Neill video, a nostalgia further fuelled by the long lack of a decent quality master copy. The classic clip about romance in foreign climes — or perhaps a romance that unfurled somewhere else entirely — opens with O’Neill’s backlit image reflected in the water. But it is the scenes of O’Neill in a rippling pool wearing a shark tooth earring that seem to have left the longest impression on males of a certain vintage.

Get Some Sleep

Bic Runga, Music Video, 2002

The first single from Bic Runga’s chart-topping second album Beautiful Collision is — according to AudioCulture's profile of the singer — an autobiographical song about the stresses of touring. 'Get Some Sleep' peaked at number three in the New Zealand charts, and was the best-selling song by a local artist in 2002. Two videos were made; the version aimed at local audiences sees Runga roaming Aotearoa in a mobile radio station playing CDs and records, greeting fans and generally broadcasting happy vibes: Yes...we do believe Bic may be having fun.  

History Never Repeats

Split Enz, Music Video, 1981

A classic music video for a classic song (from the Waiata album) that is very much of its time. Features Noel Crombie's art school-infused clothes, make-up and surreal sets, giant beach balls, a hula hoop, and a young and endearingly-geeky Neil Finn out front. The video was one of the first (the 12th!) broadcast on US MTV after it launched in August 1981.

Juice

Headless Chickens, Music Video, 1994

Co-written by lead singer Fiona McDonald, 'Juice' celebrates the days when she watched morning music shows as a child. Alongside scenes of children playing outside, things take a more sinister turn indoors, with one particularly nightmarish sequence showing her younger self restrained in a dentist’s chair. 'Juice' was released paired with Chickens song 'Choppers', and won Single of the Year at the 1994 NZ Music Awards. It was originally recorded by McDonald’s other band, Strawpeople, under the title 'Dreamchild'. It featured on 1994 Strawpeople album Broadcast.

Riot Squad

The Newmatics, Music Video, 1981

This song is from New Zealand’s troubled winter of 1981. The Springbok Tour gave the term “riot squad” currency throughout the country — but the Auckland live music scene and the police were already enduring a very fraught relationship. This number from Auckland ska/soul band The Newmatics, released on the band’s Broadcast OR double 7" EP, was actually written about a 1980 police raid on XS Cafe in Airedale Street. The Keystone Cops music video is classic early 80s TVNZ Avalon and features actors Ross Jolly and Michael Wilson as two thirds of the 'blue shadow'.

Suddenly Strange

Bic Runga, Music Video, 1997

This single, one of a number from Bic Runga's debut album Drive, is about calling time on a relationship. Runga's bittersweet lyric is a declaration of independence that never quite manages to be unequivocal. Nominated for Best Video at the 1998 New Zealand Music Awards, the stylishly colourful clip finds her inhabiting a cube in varied Auckland locations — enclosed while life goes on around her, at least until the hopeful final shot. Director and graphic designer Wayne Conway was also nominated for his covers to albums Twist (Dave Dobbyn) and Broadcast (Strawpeople).

Who the Hell Do You Think You Are?

Garageland, Music Video, 2001

'Who The Hell Do You Think You Are?' represents a departure — in many forms — for Garageland. In the video, the usually mild-mannered band play a strip club, surrounded by pole dancers. Directed by Myles Van Urk (creator of grunge album series The Trip), it caused quite a stir, deemed too sexually explicit for music TV, and restricted, in an edited version, to broadcast after 9:30pm. Gone is the sun-soaked pop of previous hits, replaced by bluesy guitar riffs. Garageland would soon be gone too, splitting not long after releasing the track on their final album, Scorpio Righting.

No Pulse

Disasteradio, Music Video, 2010

This promo, directed by Simon Ward, showcases a single from Wellington’s Disasteradio. The bespectacled "D-rad" broadcasts a soup of synth-pop from the safety of his bedroom bunker via walkie talkie to his bandit girl, stranded outside in a post apocalyptic landscape. She fends off zombie marauders after her dog; he eats - and gets infected by - a pizza ... and talks to his hand. And his hand talks back.

Trick with a Knife

Strawpeople, Music Video, 1994

This black and white video is certainly not the first to adopt the patented 'are these images connected, or is it all a trick' approach. A woman crouches in a nightgown; a man waits in an expensive looking chair; a confident woman in a distinctive dress enters the room, possibly for the cash. Taken from 1994's Broadcast, probably Strawpeople's most successful album, 'Trick with a Knife' features vocals by Fiona McDonald. Strawpeople founders Mark Tierney and Paul Casserly make fleeting appearances.