Room that Echoes

Peking Man, Music Video, 1985

"I'm gonna build a room that echoes, around and around and around with its own sound." Peking Man's career peaked in 1985 with 'Room That Echoes', a number one hit that saw the band dominate the 1986 music awards. Directed by John Day, the surrealistic video features animated computer graphics of the afore-mentioned room, slowly building wall by wall and tracking against a background of stars. Margaret Urlich is the only band member present, appearing as a lone silhouetted figure dancing across a checkerboard floor.

Loose Change

Grayson Gilmour, Music Video, 2009

Shot by Jesse Taylor Smith on 16mm on an antique Russian Krasnogorsk camera, Loose Change features a succession of movies within movies until it seems that everyone and everything could be on a set (apart, perhaps, from the photographer in the pig's head). Piano and glockenspiel build, crash and ebb as a model helicopter fights a fire in a building (life nearly imitated art when the stovetop pyrotechnics got out of hand); and, at the meta-end, the couple watching the "Stay Indoors" message on the TV are themselves revealed to be outside on a footpath.

Hey Judith

Dribbling Darts of Love, Music Video, 1993

Shot in and around Auckland, Karyn Hay's gorgeously colourful clip follows two love birds and their associated entourage - a female body builder, a Ken doll and a punk. Although not officially in the band, Andrew Fagan appears twice in the video, once as a hooded mugger, and again as the drummer, identity concealed with a paper bag.   "One of my favourite scenes is the red lipstick on the kissing booth." Karyn Hay, May 09  

I Love My Leather Jacket

The Chills, Music Video, 1986

The Chills visited England in 1986. This video mixes a moody rehearsal room performance with reminders of London, including Big Ben, the underground and apartment buildings (British sci fi comic 2000AD can also be spied). Vocalist Martin Phillipps wears the leather jacket of the song’s title. The jacket was bequeathed to him by Chills bandmate Martyn Bull, who died of leukaemia at the age of only 22. Paired with single 'The Great Escape', the song reached number four on the New Zealand charts, early in 1987.

Never Fade Away

Hello Sailor, Music Video, 1994

This song is taken from the only new album released in the 1990s by Kiwi music legends Hello Sailor. In an AudioCulture profile of the band, writer Murray Cammick praised the Dave McArtney-penned track as one of two strong additions to the Hello Sailor canon (alongside song 'New Tattoo', also from 1994). The music video features the band playing (on a Ponsonby street, in a derelict building) intercut with archive clips (famous sporting moments, returned servicemen, Edmund Hillary, hikoi, the Beatles tour), echoing the song’s lyrical themes of waning memories and nostalgia.

Money Worries

MC OJ and Rhythm Slave, Music Video, 1991

Although this track from teen hip hoppers Otis Frizzell (MC OJ) and Mark Williams (Slave) is very much a collaboration of Auckland talents, the video sees them on the streets of Wellington - plus the railway station and massive wharf building Shed 21, before it was turned into apartments. Co-written by the pair with (and produced by) Mark Tierney and Paul Casserly from Strawpeople, it features a screaming chorus from Mikey Havoc, then lead singer of Push Push. An early video to be funded by NZ On Air, the hyperactive promo was directed by Matt Palmer (Breathe).

Schallblüte

HDU, Music Video, 2001

In this performance-based High Dependency Unit (HDU) music video, directed by Dunedin musician and visual artist Nigel Bunn, a roving fisheye camera lens provides a suitably edgy vibe. The jittery black and white visuals evoke paranoia films like Repulsion, Eraserhead, and local classic Kitchen Sink. The clip builds up a broiling intensity, through judicious use of sped-up motion, original povs, and flash cuts that match the sonic boom tempo of HDU's trademark wall of sound. 

Telephone Lover

The Crocodiles, Music Video, 1980

The Crocodiles were on tour supporting their second album, Looking at Ourselves, when this video was shot in Dunedin. Though he’d left the touring unit, Fane Flaws still provided material and was co-writer of ‘Telephone Lover’. Dunedin’s old Bing Harris Sargood building provides the backdrop for most of the video, while the ‘live’ sections were shot at the now-defunct Shoreline Tavern. Dunedin cameraman Peter Janes directed and filmed the segment for regional news programme The South Tonight.

Anything Could Happen

The Clean, Music Video, 1981

Was there a cooler band in the world than The Clean in 1982? Skinny suits, round sunglasses, video performances aping the great old Monkees' moves but tuned to the "deadpan" setting. Rubbish dump. Derelict building. Cemetery. Check. TVNZ's Andrew Shaw travelled south to Christchurch to direct this one, but he kept the clip faithful to the band's style for this now iconic tribute to indie nihilism.

Wayho

Minuit, Music Video, 2010

An eco-anthem lurks at the heart of this infectious, upbeat Minuit number. To accompany it, director Sally Tran conjures up a claustrophobic world where people are trapped inside a decaying building (actually Spookers haunted house at Karaka), and flowers and outdoor pursuits are the stuff of museum displays. Lead vocalist Ruth Carr (complete with bird make-up) and her dancers run this way and that, but there seems to be no escape. The song plays out with Carr singing to herself because she decided no-one else would write a song with her name in it.