Don't Fight it Marsha, It's Bigger Than Both of Us

Blam Blam Blam, Music Video, 1981

Blam Blam Blam’s second hit from 1981 was angular and artsy, hook-filled but unsettling: all qualities captured in a theatrical video, directed by Andrew Shaw. Clowns, magicians, fire-eaters and trick cyclists join the band, while actors play out the saga of ‘Don’t Fight It, Marsha’. The actors — including Phillip Gordon (Came a Hot Friday), Michael Hurst and Donogh Rees (Constance) — were directed by Harry Sinclair, who would later join Blam band member Don McGlashan in The Front Lawn. The Len Lye-style scratch effects were by Jenny Pullar, the Blams’ lighting designer.

We Gon Ride

Dei Hamo, Music Video, 2003

Director Chris Graham delivers five minutes of cars, comedy and eye candy in this slick who's who of the 2003 Kiwi scene. Featuring DJ Sir-Vere, VJ Jane Yee, ex sports star Matthew Ridge and Paul Holmes (well actually he was a no show — but his understudy made an appearance), the clip succeeded in planting a relatively unknown hip hop artist squarely on the front page. The result was the biggest selling Kiwi single of the year (it went platinum, and spent five weeks at number one). Named Best Video at the 2005 NZ Music Awards, it cost at least $50,000 to make. 

Walking Off a Cliff Again

The Mint Chicks, Music Video, 2006

Another treasure from director Sam Peacocke — who also directed Vodafone Award-winning Mint Chicks video Crazy? Yes! Dumb? No! — this promo channels the kind of obtuse storyline that Mint Chicks songs were known for. It opens on a tiny lego band ordering a comatose man in a rabbit hat to help them. Sulky teenagers, feuding couples and a high dive into a tin bathtub complete the outlandishly art-directed picture, before arriving at the clip's high-water mark — the bunny boils over.

E Ipo

Prince Tui Teka, Music Video, 1983

Music legend Prince Tui Teka performs his greatest hit ‘E Ipo’ in this excerpt from a TVNZ special recorded at Auckland’s Mandalay Ballroom. Based on a traditional Indonesian folk melody, ‘E Ipo’ was written by Teka with Ngoi (‘Poi E’) Pewhairangi, when he was courting her niece (and his future wife) Missy. The two join Tui Teka on stage (along with Pita Sharples’ Te Roopu Manutaki cultural group) for a rousing rendition performed with his trademark verve and humour. The song reached number one, following te reo-dominated chart-toppers 'The Bridge' (sung by Deane Waretini) in 1981, and Howard Morrison's 1982 version of 'How Great Thou Art'.

Theme from Once Were Warriors

Tama Renata, Music Video, 1994

Tama Renata’s memorable theme for Once Were Warriors embedded itself in the New Zealand psyche as much as the line “cook me some eggs”, or the ominous buzzing sounds of the pūrerehua. In this promo clip, the Herbs guitarist takes centre stage as he shreds on a custom stratocaster cast in traditional wood whakairo (carving). The shots of Renata playing are interspersed with iconic scenes from the movie, which launched its takeover of New Zealand cinemas in mid 1994, before screening around the globe. Tama Renata passed away on 4 November 2018.

Like Water

Ladi6, Music Video, 2011

This smoky, soul-inflected love song comes from hip hop diva Ladi6's second album The Liberation Of... (winner of the 2011 Taite Music Prize). Water might be the chosen metaphor for love here but director Faye McNeil provides no glimpses at all of the wet stuff. Instead, the deep blue oases are graphical — the work of street and graffiti artists The Cut Collective. The sands that Ladi6 treks across are dunes at Te Paki in the Far North (where it rained for all but five hours of the three day shoot). It was a Best Video finalist at the 2011 NZ Music Awards.

Seek Know More

50Hz, Music Video, 2002

Set in the board rooms, and on the streets and trolley buses of the capital, Nektar Films' polished clip stars Ladi6 (Karoline Tamati). It portrays the quest for "success" in a hostile corporate world, contrasted with life on the street, and seems to ask - is it all worth it?  Look out for actor Julian Arahanga and Loop Recordings head honcho Mikee Tucker at the board table.

You Make the Whole World Smile

The Red Nose Band featuring Hammond Gamble, Music Video, 1992

The video for this Red Nose Day chart-topper makes the most of a powerhouse combination: celebrities and cute babies. Although lead singer Hammond Gamble gets his share of screen time, the result is largely devoted to close-ups of perhaps the biggest pile-up of famous Kiwis to cram into a single music video. The faces include appearances early on by Simone Kessell, Ilona Rodgers, and Aussie actor Mark Raffety  plus The Wizard, sports legends Grant Fox, John Kirwan and Jeremy Coney, newsreaders Judy Bailey and Anita McNaught, and singers Tina Cross and Suzanne Lynch. 

Lucky

Fly My Pretties, Music Video, 2004

A live performance music video taken from the highly acclaimed Live at Bats album. Simply but stylishly shot and edited, this clip suits the moody style of this folk rock song from Fly My Pretties creative director Barnaby Weir.  

In Colour

Shapeshifter, Music Video, 2013

Electronic soul band Shapeshifter is one of the New Zealand acts whose songs were covered by international artists in Nick Dwyer’s TV series Making Tracks. Dwyer takes that relationship a step further by directing this infectious music video, for one of the singles from their fourth album, Delta. He accompanies their lyrics, about putting aside the pressures and problems of everyday life, with a series of vibrant images from around the world. Gathered during his globetrotting, they celebrate human connection and the simple pleasures afforded by music (and a NZ 1990 t-shirt).