Rain

Dragon, Music Video, 1983

After the classic line-up of Sydney-based hitmakers Dragon reformed in 1982, the band found a new lease of life when anthemic single 'Rain' got to number two on the Australian charts (at a time of severe drought). 'Rain' was a departure — written by Todd Hunter and his wife Joanna Piggott, instead of Dragon's songwriter supreme Paul Hewson. The video offers more evidence of a new look, thanks to drummer Terry Chambers (fresh from XTC) and US keyboardist and producer Alan Mansfield. The video is one of three made for 'Rain' — the band rejected a post-apocalyptic version. 

Turn from the Rain

The Veils, Music Video, 2013

With 'Turn from the Rain', The Veils added their name to the prestigious list of bands who have recorded at London's famed Abbey Road Studios — a list which includes The Beatles, Pink Floyd and Radiohead. According to frontman Finn Andrews “The room there is so musty and still … you want any sound you make to be worth disturbing the grand silence for.” The idea of making a video at Abbey Road arrived at 2am in a Hackney flat; the performances were shot on 16mm film, an appropriately retro touch considering the venue. The recordings were later released on The Abbey Road EP

Rain and Tears

The Hi-Revving Tongues, Music Video, 1969

‘Rain and Tears’ was inspired by a reworking of Pachelbel’s ‘Canon in D Major’ by Greek prog rockers Aphrodite’s Child (featuring Vangelis and Demis Roussos). Auckland band The Hi-Revving Tongues had their biggest hit with their version, which topped the New Zealand singles chart in 1969. This footage is from the Loxene Golden Disc contest, where they won the group award, and were nominated for best song. It’s a restrained performance which gives little hint of the band’s more psychedelic sound  — or their enthusiasm for onstage pyrotechnics.

It Was Raining

The Verlaines, Music Video, 1985

The Verlaines sing and play while sitting on a picnic rug under a tree, with assorted friends and family (and a dog) as fellow picnickers. Meanwhile mystic mask-wearing woodland creatures lurk behind the idyll. Cheap but certainly not without charms (there's even a feathery one hanging off the guitar). Check out a young Shayne Carter lounging under the tree fuschia.

Sitting in the Rain

The Underdogs, Music Video, 1967

Sitting in the Rain is a New Zealand pop landmark. One of the earliest music promo clips, filmed for television in 1967 by the NZBC, it is a cover version by a local band that became better known than the original (by UK blues stalwart John Mayall). The Underdogs were a powerful electric blues combo, but with 'Sitting in the Rain' they knew that less is more; the film clip, used to fill TV scheduling gaps, is similarly unfussy. Like a surly, underground Monkees, the anarchic Underdogs don't hide the fact that the performance is mimed.

I Like Rain

The Jean-Paul Sartre Experience, Music Video, 1987

The set has a back-drop curtain made out of milk bottle top foil; the band are wearing plastic rubbish sacks fashioned into tunics, and have painted faces. The props include a disco mirror ball, a toilet seat sculpture, a giant bug, and umbrellas. It's all slightly off-beam, but the band's performance is deadpan sweet. There’s the requisite Flying Nun film scratching, and some literal-but-amusing image and lyric matching. It all combines to make a DIY delight, an effortless two decades before Flight of the Conchords or Mighty Boosh.

The Game of Love

Ian Morris (aka Tex Pistol), Music Video, 1987

The video for Tex Pistol's chart-topping, electro-pop remake of 60s track 'The Game of Love' was a stylish triumph for budding teenage director Paul Middleditch. Tex Pistol — aka former Th'Dudes member Ian Morris — is dressed in black and white, with silver tipped cowboy boots and a red semi-acoustic guitar. Suiting the less is more approach of the remake, the video features Morris and backing vocalist Callie Blood in a world of darkness, rain and reflective surfaces. 'The Game of Love' hit number one for one week; copies of the single ran out early on.

Outlook for Thursday

DD Smash, Music Video, 1983

This weather-themed Kiwi classic spent 21 weeks in the charts, and became one of DD Smash's biggest hits. The quirky, light-hearted video was played repeatedly on Saturday chart show Ready to Roll, and won Best Music Video at the 1983 New Zealand Music Awards. It was directed by a young Andrew Shaw (of Hey Hey It’s Andy fame, later an executive at TVNZ). DD Smash singer/songwriter Dave Dobbyn hams it up in Adidas tracksuit and yellow raincoat, while drummer (and 1980s heartthrob) Peter 'Rooda' Warren appears in his speedos.

Stop the Music

P-Money, Music Video, 2004

Clever lighting and plenty of rain feature on the video for this chart-topping P-Money track. As he had with Scribe's breakthrough hit 'Stand Up', P-Money melds Scribe's rapping talents with loud guitars. Directed by Greg Page, the moody widescreen clip also features Elemeno P's Justyn Pilbrow on guitar, and Sam Sheppard from 8 Foot Sativa on drums. 'Stop the Music' appeared on P-Money's second studio album, NZ Music Award-winner Magic City (2004).

Auckland Tonight

The Androidss, Music Video, 1981

One of the great rock'n'roll songs about Auckland is the work of a Christchurch band. 'Auckland Tonight' is The Androidss' claim to fame - and yet it was the b-side of their only single. The work of a band that was never scared of a good time, it extols the virtues of a night on the town with special mention of Proud Scum and Toy Love playing at the Windsor Castle. The TVNZ video careers around rain soaked streets (with a shot of the long-gone Harbour Bridge toll booths) and offers telling glimpses of The Androidss' bête noir - the central police station.