Verona

Elemeno P, Music Video, 2003

This Elemeno P video sees the band performing inside a storage freezer in an ice cream factory. "There was no legitimate reason for shooting in a freezer," recalls director Greg Page ('Exit to the City', 'Super Gyration'). "I just enjoy torturing the bands I work with." The location was secured through Flying Fish Executive Producer James Moore, whose family owned an icecream factory in Otara. Page recalls the challenges of filming in below freezing temperatures here.

Stop the Music

P-Money, Music Video, 2004

Clever lighting and plenty of rain feature on the video for this chart-topping P-Money track. As he had with Scribe's breakthrough hit 'Stand Up', P-Money melds Scribe's rapping talents with loud guitars. Directed by Greg Page, the moody widescreen clip also features Elemeno P's Justyn Pilbrow on guitar, and Sam Sheppard from 8 Foot Sativa on drums. 'Stop the Music' appeared on P-Money's second studio album, NZ Music Award-winner Magic City (2004).

Everything

P-Money, Music Video, 2008

Hip-hop DJ and producer P-Money moves to the dance floor with this pumping, chart topper which marks the recording debut of Australian X Factor finalist Vince Harder. In Rebecca Gin’s quirky video, P Money has a whirlwind romance which starts in a supermarket and ends in tears in a club (with a sharp contrast between the white of daytime and the blacks of the night scenes) but the “shoulder friends” are the attention grabbers here. They represent the music that people carry around with them (or, at least, until they venture down one dark alley too many).

Caroline's Dream

Children's Hour, Music Video, 1983

Directed by Chris Knox, this performance-based video features assorted strange props including a doll, a mannequin and half a pig's head. The song title is Caroline's Dream, and the video has a dreamlike quality, or should that be nightmare? And what is Chris Matthews doing writhing about on stage with his pants undone?

Think Twice

Aotearoa All Stars, Music Video, 2008

Rebecca Gin created a simple but effective black and white video for this charity single, aimed at encouraging young people to ‘Think Twice’ before committing a crime. The line-up of singers and rappers is indeed all-star, and their mass performance footage is intercut with relevant street scenes illustrating the theme. The cast of New Zealand hip-hop royalty features Che Fu, Scribe, P-Money, Savage and DJ Sir-Vere (who initiated the project).

Wake Up

Aaradhna, Music Video, 2012

Aaradhna’s third album Treble and Reverb was released on hip hop label Dawn Raid and co-written and produced by P Money and Evan Short (Concord Dawn) — but its “retro/metro” sound channels the glory days of the classic early 60s girl groups rather than more contemporary styles. ‘Wake Up’, the lead-off single, is a bright, sunny song about trying to fix a broken soul. The video — directed by the award-winning Special Problems — nods to the era with an animated symphony of pop-coloured modern household objects happily distracting from the lyric’s call to action.

Dreaming

Scribe, Music Video, 2004

After his hard-hitting debut single 'Stand Up' and the hit remix of 'Not Many', Scribe took a gentler approach on the third single from his five times platinum debut album. Rolling clouds open the music video, which trades bombastic beats and ominous synth tones for gentler piano. The chart-topping hook, originally written for Che Fu, was sung by Scribe himself after encouragement from collaborator P-Money. Photos from Scribe’s childhood appear on screen while he raps about the struggle to realise his potential, before glimpses of 'making of' footage from previous videos.

Pyromaniac

The Verlaines, Music Video, 1984

This song from Flying Nun stalwarts The Verlaines comes from their 10 O'Clock in the Afternoon EP — the follow-up to their signature single 'Death and the Maiden'. The video was made at TVNZ's Avalon Studios where more than a few clips were marred by inappropriate treatments in the early-80s — but The Verlaines were spared unnecessary trickery, props or actors. With a simple set and an all but imperceptible transition from black and white to colour as the only effect, the focus is on the burning, claustrophobic intensity of song and performance. 

Bitter

Shihad, Music Video, 1995

"There's just some things that I want to tell you" yells Jon Toogood on this track, as he addresses a bitter ex-lover he is very thankful to have got away from. The song is driven by drums, whose beats per minute are matched by the high speed editing of this video. The slices of live footage concentrate mostly on a long-haired Toogood, and a very large audience at the Big Day Out. A number of crowd surfers are among them. The single is from Shihad's second album Killjoy (1995) their first to go gold in New Zealand.

Japanese Girls

PanAm, Music Video, 2002

To cast the many faces in this video, director Greg Page put up an advertisement in an Asian food hall. The clip combines band PanAm rock and rolling in a warehouse, with shots of various Asian women larking around in a photo booth, and leaving (subtitled) messages for the band. Director and musician Greg Page has gone on to direct dozens more music videos (including clips for The Datsuns and Elemeno P), animated shorts, and 2003 horror movie The Locals