Interview

JJ Fong & Ally Xue - Funny As Interview

Keen to create new acting roles for Asian women and work with friends, JJ Fong and Ally Xue teamed up with fellow actor Perlina Lau and director Roseanne Liang to create web series Flat3 and Friday Night Bites. Fong and Xue talk in this Funny As interview about taking on comedy, multitasking on set and other subjects, including: Meeting each other (and fellow Flat3 star Perlina Lau) while acting in a children's play at university Asking Roseanne Liang, who'd just given birth to her second child, to write and direct Flat3  Creating new acting roles for themselves after being sick of being offered gigs as prostitutes or dragon ladies Giving comedy a go for the first time on Flat3 — "...we were like, let's just do it guys. We didn't even know if we were funny either" Taking a gamble to release Flat3 on YouTube at a time when web series were a new concept How they became political and topical in follow up series Friday Night Bites Next goal is to make a programme for television as "we have finished doing online web series now"

Interview

Alison Maclean: A gothic crush…

Interview and Editing - Gemma Gracewood. Camera - Mark Weston

Canadian-born to New Zealand parents, writer and director Alison Maclean helmed one of the most successful NZ Film Commission-funded short films of all time, Kitchen Sink, which debuted at Cannes and won eight international awards. A graduate of Elam School of Fine Arts, she has directed feature films Crush (which she also wrote) and Jesus’ Son. A director of commercials and television series including Sex and the City and Gossip Girl, Maclean divides her time between New York, Canada and New Zealand, and she is developing several feature films.

Interview

Max Cryer - Funny As Interview

Purveyor of good grammar and master of words, Max Cryer has had an extensive career in the New Zealand entertainment industry.

Interview

Robin Laing: Producing our stories…

Interview and Editing - Ian Pryor. Camera - Alex Backhouse

Gaylene Preston has called Robin Laing 'an oasis of reason and practicality' in the chaos that is filmmaking. Laing began making feature films at a time when women producers were rare in New Zealand. Since then she has produced an eclectic mix of features, short films and arts documentaries, and often lent a hand to emerging filmmakers.