Series

All Things Being Equal

Television, 1978

All Things Being Equal was an early TVNZ sitcom written by future Gloss creator Rosemary McLeod. Screening on Friday nights the 70s gender politics satire was a one-off NZ TV experiment, broadcast live-to-air from Avalon Studios (a second series ditched the live shoot). Ginette McDonald and Bruno Lawrence had made their screen debut together in Pukemanu and were reunited by series director Ross Jennings. When film director Roger Donaldson saw Bruno on the show, it led to Lawrence being cast as Al Shaw in Smash Palace — his career-defining big screen role. 

Series

Being Eve

Television, 2001–2002

This quirky, upbeat comedy-drama looked at teen life through the eyes of 15-year-old Eve (Fleur Saville). Something of an amateur teen anthropologist, Eve questions everything in her world, musing on life to the camera. The series' fresh, self-aware style appealed directly to media-savvy teenagers. The TV3 series launched Saville's TV career, fostered young directing and producing talent, won many awards (including Best Drama Series at the 2002 NZ TV Awards) and was nominated for an International Emmy. It sold to over 40 territories, including the United States.

Series

Back of the Y Masterpiece Television

Television, 2001–2008

This cult late-night TV2 series mixing sacrilege, beer-fuelled bogan hijinks and Jackass-like stunts. Created by Chris Stapp and Matt Heath, it centred around a mock live TV show, with music from house band Deja Voodoo. Characters like "retarded South Island mechanic" Spanners Watson featured in BSA-baiting segments like 'Randy Campbell's Extreme Stunts' (which would later inspire Stapp and Heath's 2007 movie The Devil Dared Me To). The first series also screened on MTV2 in Europe and Channel V in Australia. A second series screened on C4 in 2008.

Series

The Good Word

Television, 2009–2012

Award winning novelist Emily Perkins presents a series about “books and the people who love them”. The follow-up to her previous series The Book Show — and looking like it might be set in a graffitied bunker in Auckland’s Myers Park — it managed to be chatty without being frivolous, and to take itself seriously without being worthy. Regular features included a panel discussion about the book of the week, a visit to a book group, a guest talking about their favourite book and Finlay Macdonald highlighting a notable New Zealand book, in his ‘Under the Covers’ feature.

Series

Hard Out

Television, 2002

In this early 2000s teen series skaters Jeff and Noodle stumble upon an alien conspiracy in the town of Middledon. Terry Teo’s slacker successors are the only ones who can resist being mind controlled, save the town, and stop their beloved skate park being 'wasted' and turned into a mall. In the Ritalin-fuelled caper, future World fashion designer Benny Castles plays Jeff, Rawiri Paratene is Gran (!) Pekapeka, and Antony Starr's Stevo channels teen slacker icon Jeff Spicoli. The Screenworks production featured dream segments from Animation Research Limited.

Series

Tales of the Mist

Television, 1986

Tales of the Mist was an 80s series for children that dramatised six stories by writer Anthony Holcroft. Peppered with folklore, magic and animism (the belief that things in the natural world posses a ‘spirit’) the six stories feature encounters with otherworldly beings in rustic New Zealand settings: The Island in the Lagoon, The Tramp, Girl in the Cabbage Tree, The Night Bees, and Rosie Moonshine. The show was directed by NZ kids television veteran (Woolly Valley, Count Homogenized) Kim Gabara.

Series

Decades in Colour

Television, 2016–2017

The first series of Decades in Colour sourced home movies from over 800 New Zealanders, to look back at life from the 1950s to the 1970s. Presented by Judy Bailey, it screened on Prime. Mixing lost images and new interviews, three hour-long episodes each focussed on a different decade: from the post-war suburbia of the 50s, to rugby, racing and beer in the 60s, to emerging challenges to cultural norms in the 70s, as jet travel and TV broadened perspectives and a more independent national identity emerged. A second series debuted in October 2017, focussing on work, home and play.

Series

Find Me a Māori Bride

Television, 2015–2017

In this mockumentary series, two metrosexual Māori males have six months to find a Māori bride in order to win a hefty inheritance. Created by writer Dane Giraud, the show mines comedy from being a modern Māori in the city. NZ Herald reviewer Alex Casey praised it for adding "much-needed fresh perspectives to New Zealand television comedy." The cast of the Kiel McNaughton-directed hit includes Cohen Holloway (Boy), Amanda Billing (Shortland Street), Rachel House (Whale Rider) and Siobhan Marshall (Outrageous Fortune). Jennifer Ward-Lealand narrates.

Series

50 Years of New Zealand Television

Television, 2010

This major documentary series chronicles the first half century of Kiwi television. Made for the Prime network (after being declined by TVNZ), it examines the medium’s evolution across seven episodes. After an opening 70 minute overview, individual programmes covered the stories of sport, entertainment, drama and comedy, protest coverage, New Zealand identity and Māori television — with an impressive array of interviews, and 50 years worth of telly highlights. John Bates was nominated for Best Documentary Director at the 2011 Aotearoa Film and TV Awards.

Series

20/20

Television, 1993–ongoing

American current affairs format 20/20 was first introduced to New Zealand on TV3 in 1993, where it screened for a decade. In 2005 it moved to TVNZ, and became TV2’s signature current affairs show. The hour-long slot mixed content taken from the ABC-produced American show, with award-winning local stories; local subjects ranged from infanticide to Nicky Watson. The first host was Louise Wallace, then at TVNZ it was Miriama Kamo, and from 2011, Sonya Wilson. In 2014 local content ceased being made for 20/20. Two years later it moved to TV One, with Carolyn Robinson hosting.