The Māori Sidesteps - Series Two

Web, 2017 (Full Length Episodes)

The second season of comedy web series The Māori Sidesteps sees the now established band (who still work at Pete’s Emporium) facing a plethora of absurd challenges. Hoani questions his heritage and joins another, much whiter, band, Jamie faces marriage trouble, and Lemmi’s Samoan roots leave him in very hot water. Meanwhile Riki faces delusions of living in the Old West, Kelly gets the band an uncomfortable booking at a “birthday”, and Dollar$ faces competition as the band’s manager from the enigmatic Maui (Te Kohe Tuhaka). 

Aotearoa Hip Hop Summit

Television, 2001 (Full Length)

The Aotearoa Hip Hop Summit held in Auckland 2001, was the biggest hip hop event ever staged in New Zealand. This documentary showcases the hottest names in the four elements of NZ hip hop: break dancers, graf artists, MCs and DJs. Featuring international acts from Germany and Australia, with Ken Swift representing old skool break dancing from New York and Tha Liks from Los Angeles. Local acts include Che Fu, Te Kupu, King Kapisi, P Money and DJ Sir-Vere. Presenters are Hayden Hare and Trent Helmbright.

Prince Tui Teka - 1983 Variety Show

Television, 1983 (Full Length Episode)

Kicking off with his hero Elvis Presley's song 'That's Alright,' the late Prince Tui Teka delivers a classic performance in this TVNZ-filmed variety show (one of three specials). The Yandall Sisters back-up on the smoky, Vegas-inspired set. Tui sings his hit 'E Ipo' with wife Missy, and they pay tribute to the song’s Māori lyricist Ngoi (‘Poi-E’) Pewhairangi. The songs are peppered with warmth, humour and poi action (led by a young Pita Sharples), as Tui Teka confirms his reputation as one of Aotearoa's great entertainers. The classy Bernie Allen-led band includes legendary guitarist Tama Renata.

Compilation - Memories of Service 5

Web, 2017 (Excerpts)

On land, sea and in the air, this fifth series of Memories of Service covers many of the major moments of twentieth century conflicts, in the words of those who were there. Men and women relive the formative times of their lives, be it facing the enemy, treating the injured or taking on jobs back home, left vacant by the men who went to fight. Produced by director David Blyth and Hibiscus Coast Community RSA Museum curator Patricia Stroud, the interviews are a valuable record of those who served. The individual interviews will be added  added to NZ On Screen soon.

The Māori Sidesteps - Series One

Web, 2016 (Full Length Episodes)

Tired of working his go nowhere job at Pete’s Emporium in Porirua, Jamie (Jamie McCaskill) persuades some of his workmates (Cohen Holloway, Rob Mokaraka and Jerome Leota) to form band The Māori Sidesteps. Throughout this web series they find themselves at inopportune gigs, deal with interference from their over-reaching manager Dollar$ (Raybon Kan), and face an early band break up. Luckily the band is reinforced by Jamie’s brother Kelly (Erroll Anderson), who joins as a fifth member — outshining several other auditionees (including Jemaine Clement). 

The Governor - He Iwi Ko Tahi Tatou (Episode Four)

Television, 1977 (Full Length Episode)

The Governor examined the life of George Grey, providing a whole new angle on traditional portraits of him as the "Good Governor". The six-part historical blockbuster was hugely controversial, provoking a parliamentary inquiry and "test match sized" audiences. This episode — 'He Iwi Kotahi Tatou' (Now We Are One People)' — won a Feltex award for best script. War looms in the Waikato as Māori tribes band together; peacemaker and kingmaker Wiremu Tāmihana (the late Don Selwyn) agonises over the right course of action.

Artist

Deane Waretini

Adrian Waretini was born in Rotorua in 1946, the son of Deane Waretini, a celebrated Māori singer in the 1930s and 1940s. After his father died, Adrian began singing his songs and adopted his Christian name as a music career beckoned. Waretini Junior went on to perform with the Māori show bands in the 1970s. In 1980, he recorded a song written by his cousin (and Te Arawa elder) George Tait. Initially self-released, ’The Bridge’ was picked up by CBS; it became the first number one single to be sung in te reo after it topped the New Zealand chart for two weeks in April 1981.

The Power of Music (Te Kaha o Te Waiata)

Short Film, 1988 (Full Length)

Auckland band Herbs could have released their new album in the comfortable confines of an Auckland nightclub. Instead, they travelled to Ruatoria — a troubled and divided East Coast town where turmoil surrounding a Rastafarian sect had resulted in assaults, kidnappings and firebombed churches. Lee Tamahori and John Day's documentary captures an emotional experience for band and locals as they meet at Mangahanea Marae, in an attempt to shift the focus from disunity to harmony. This footage also yielded the award-winning Sensitive to a Smile music video.

Artist

Salmonella Dub

Salmonella Dub formed in Christchurch in 1992. Purveyors of dub reggae at a time when guitar rock and dance dominated the musical landscape, they sugar-coated their rhythms with a tongue-in-cheek band name and offbeat covers. They went on to establish themselves at the forefront of a distinctively NZ mix of groove based dub, reggae and electronica. Tiki Taane did time with the band as both a live sound mixer and a vocalist, before going solo in 2007. The following year saw album Feel the Seasons Change, with the band performing live with Māori instrumentation and the NZ Symphony Orchestra.

Urutaa

Alien Weaponry, Music Video, 2016

Alien Weaponry’s first single ‘Urutaa’ was released in late 2016, following their triumph at the Smokefree Rockquest and Pacifica Beats. The band won media attention for their inclusion of te reo Māori in metal music. The video sees them performing on a soundstage, interspersed with a pocket watch motif. The watch is a reference to a series of incidents between Māori and Pākehā in the early 1800s, which resulted in an attack by Māori on visiting ship The Boyd. The band used the incident as a metaphor for continuing misunderstandings "between cultures, generations and individuals".