Kia Ora Hola - Episode Four

Television, 2010 (Full Length Episode)

This six-part Māori Television series documents the experiences of six teenagers from Māori language schools in Rotorua, on a three-week cultural field trip to Santiago, Chile. The students take their own cameras to record their experiences. They are hosted by the Montessori school Colegio Pucalan and local families, and take in the sites of the Chilean capital. The series is in Te Reo Māori, with English sub-titles. In this episode, the students tour Santiago, meet street entertainers, and find out about Chile’s main faith - Catholicism.

Series

Kia Ora Hola

Television, 2010

This six-part Māori Television series documents the experiences of six teenagers from Māori language schools in Rotorua, on a three-week cultural field trip to Santiago, Chile. The students take their own cameras to record their experiences. They are hosted by the Montessori school Colegio Pucalan and local families, and take in the sites and sounds of the Chilean capital. The series is in Te Reo Māori, with English sub-titles. It is a follow-up series to the original Kia Ora Ni Hao, set in China.

Kia Ora Hola - Episode Three

Television, 2010 (Full Length Episode)

This six-part Māori Television series documents the experiences of six teenagers from Māori language schools in Rotorua, on a three-week cultural field trip to Santiago, Chile. The students take their own cameras to record their experiences. They are hosted by the Montessori school Colegio Pucalan and local families, and take in the sites of the Chilean capital. The series is in Te Reo Māori, with English sub-titles. In this episode, the students learn about Chilean sports, sample different cuisines, and visit the port of Valparaiso.

Holmes - David Attenborough

Television, 1991 (Excerpts)

Paul Holmes quizzes legendary naturalist Sir David Attenborough in this April 1991 studio interview. Attenborough is downunder to promote his BBC series Trials of Life. Attenborough talks about the state of natural history TV making and changes in camera technology (musing that the old days were less efficient, but “more fun”), and responds to clips of killer whales surging on to a beach chasing sea lions, and chimpanzees teaming up to hunt. Holmes asks Sir David if he’s ever been “horrified” by nature, if animals are noble, and whether this is his last big series.

Interview

Nathaniel Lees: Billy T, Sione, The Matrix and more...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Nathaniel Lees is an NZ-born Samoan actor who has acted on both stage and screen. Lees began his screen career with small roles in Death Warmed Up and Other Halves, before joining Billy T James on his sketch comedy shows. Lees went on to appear in a number of TV dramas including  Shark in the Park City Life, Gloss, Shortland Street and Street Legal. His many film roles include Sione’s WeddingThe Lord of the RingsRapa Nui and The Matrix trilogy.

Malcolm Hall

Director, Producer

British-born Malcolm Hall moved from newspaper journalism into television, after emigrating downunder. Since then his career as a producer and director has seen him helming current affairs, comedy, children's TV, and varied documentaries which have screened around the globe. At the turn of the millennium, Hall began making television for company NHNZ.

Max Quinn

Director, Producer, Camera

Aged 17, Max Quinn joined the NZ Broadcasting Corporation as a trainee cameraman. At 25 he was filming landmark television dramas like Hunter’s Gold. In 1980 he moved into directing and producing. Since joining Dunedin’s Natural History Unit (now NHNZ) in 1987, Quinn's many talents have helped cement his reputation as one of the most experienced polar filmmakers on the globe.

Roger Donaldson

Director, Writer

Roger Donaldson is notable for spearheading the New Zealand film renaissance with Sleeping Dogs (1977). He has been busy directing in Hollywood for much of the period since. Donaldson's first Kiwi story since acclaimed drama Smash Palace (1981) was Burt Munro biopic The World’s Fastest Indian (2005) — the most successful New Zealand film on home soil until the arrival of Taika Waititi's Boy in 2010.

George Andrews

Producer

Producer George Andrews has been making documentaries about New Zealand for more than 40 years, including legendary documentary series  Landmarks. In 2002 he was made an officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit, for services to television.