Jeremy Corbett

Presenter

Jeremy Corbett began dabbling in comedy and broadcasting at Massey University, before showcasing his stand-up skills on television’s Pulp Comedy. Corbett’s live experience has proven useful in a number of TV jobs, including as longtime host of news satire 7 Days (for which he won an Aotearoa Award for Best Presenter in 2011). He has also hosted comedy specials, and the Kiwi version of game show Deal or No Deal. On the radio, he was part of More FM's breakfast slot for 18 years. Corbett was an occasional presenter on Three's primetime show The Project; in 2018 he became one of the main trio of presenters.

Interview

Jeremy Corbett: 7 Days and more...

Interview, Camera and Editing – James Coleman

Born in Westport, Jeremy Corbett is a middle-aged 6’2” Leo who likes potatoes, grass, cordless drills and guitars. His broadcasting career began at student radio station Radio Massey, while studying for a BA in English and Computer Science. Since then, Corbett has gone on to develop a successful career in radio, clocking up 16 years as morning co-host on MORE FM, and has appeared regularly on NZ TV screens in shows like The Paradise Picture Show, A Bit After Ten, Celebrity Squares, The Gong Show, Pulp Comedy, Downsize Me, Deal or No Deal and most recently 7 Days.

Collection

TV3 Turns 25

Curated by NZ On Screen team

November 2014 marks 25 years since New Zealand TV’s third channel began broadcasting. This 25th birthday sampler pack looks back at iconic drama (Outrageous Fortune), upstart news shows (Nightline), fresh youth programming (Ice TV, Being Eve) and comedy high watermarks (bro’Town, Jaquie Brown, 7 Days). As the launch slogan said "come home to the feeling!"

Series

A Bit After Ten

Television, 1993–1994

One of NZ TV's first forays into stand-up comedy, this talent quest based show ran for two series (the second as A Bit More after Ten). It was hosted by Jeremy Corbett and his brother Nigel (in his TV debut), with Ian Harcourt (ex-Funny Business) as a resident judge (aided by two celebrities each week). Home viewers also voted, helping propel eventual winner Late Night Mike into the first final. Michele A'Court, Te Radar, Jon Bridges, Dean Butler and Andrew Clay graced its set and later graduated to its stand-up successor, the long running Pulp Comedy.

Jono and Ben at Ten - First Episode

Television, 2012 (Full Length Episode)

Combining sketches, pranks and parodies, Jono and Ben at Ten quickly gained popularity after it hit the airwaves in 2012. Critics praised the Jono Pryor (The Jono Project) and Ben Boyce (Pulp Sport) hosted series as one of the top shows that year. In this first episode, Pryor and Boyce hold their own Olympic Games, prank clothing store customers and get child versions of themselves to ask celebrities the hard questions. Meanwhile, comedian Guy Williams sings goodbye to rugby player Sonny Bill Williams at a press conference. The TV3 series was renamed Jono and Ben in 2015. 

Double Booking

Television, 1998 (Excerpts)

Double Booking was a one-off comedy about a bloke, Brett (Kevin Smith), reluctantly celebrating his stag night, and a woman, Jane (Theresa Healey) who is less than happy at her hen's party. When the titular double booking happens their paths collide. Brett and Jane are star-struck at the Ocean Moon restaurant; wedding days are threatened and much ado occurs. The cast is a virtual Gloss reunion. Double Booking was made as part of a series of comedy pilots for TVNZ. A series didn't ensue, but it won James Griffin a Best Comedy Script gong at the 1999 NZ Film and TV Awards.

Edwin: My Life as a Koont

Film, 2013 (Trailer)

Edwin Rouper has a habit of annoying people within seconds of meeting them. Cursed with 'Koontz-syndrome', a neurological condition in which temper and confidence dominate, he travels to Hollywood, trying to assemble a team of stars to raise awareness for the Koontz cause. Jason Stutter’s mock-documentary gleefully skirts the borderland between the koontz 'condition', and an expletive with a very similiar sound. Acting newbie Bryce Campbell scored an LA comedy award as Edwin; Raybon Kan, Jeremy Corbett and scribe Nick Ward all have cameos as sundry wackos.

Series

Jackson's Wharf

Television, 1999–2000

Created by Gavin Strawhan and Rachel Lang, Jackson’s Wharf was set in a fictional coastal town and revolved around a sibling rivalry between brothers Frank (the town cop) and Ben Jackson (a big smoke lawyer). Returning with his family, golden boy Ben has controversially inherited the local pub from his recently deceased father. Produced by South Pacific Pictures, the one hour popular drama screened for two seasons. Writer James Griffin and director Niki Caro worked on the show, alongside much of the talent who would later create Mercy Peak and Outrageous Fortune.

A Bit After Ten - Series One, Episode 11

Television, 1993 (Full Length)

It's the first semi-final in the first series of this stand-up comedy talent quest presented by Jeremy and Nigel Corbett (who assert their edgy, early 90s credentials with a running gag about Nirvana). Judges Ian Harcourt, Theresa Healey and Strawpeople's Mark Tierney preside over a line-up comprising a very composed Michele A'Court, mildcore rappers Hip Hips, The Back Garden, Jo Randerson (in angry-ish feminist mode), a particularly hirsute Jon Bridges and eventual winner Late Night Mike (with Harcourt generating as many laughs as the contestants).

Pulp Sport - Series Seven, Episode Three

Television, 2009 (Full Length Episode)

In this episode of their award-winning comedy series, Bill and Ben recount their life story, and manage to pack in Breakers basketball star CJ Bruton, a dead cheerleader, mascots in therapy, a cameo Tim Shadbolt, Back of the Y's Chris Stapp and Matt Heath as bogan bullies, a Flight of the Conchords homage and a host of other pop culture references (including Harry Potter, Forrest Gump and Wayne's World). Sporting Hell is "Fair Factor" with a sadistic take on fairground sideshows; and Bill and Ben also decide that crayfishing needn't involve getting wet.