A Class Act, Mervyn Thompson, His Life & Work

Television, 1997 (Full Length)

In the theatre world of the 70s and 80s, playwright Mervyn Thompson was an outspoken figure. He wrote, directed, and acted in theatre that presented New Zealand working class history and experience. This doco features a rare interview with Thompson before he died in 1992, as well as footage from his last work Passing Through (1991). Thompson discusses his upbringing on the West Coast of the South Island, his approach to theatre, and alludes to some of the controversies that beset his career.

Kaleidoscope - Bruce Mason 1921-1982

Television, 1983 (Full Length)

This documentary on legendary Kiwi playwright Bruce Mason premiered soon after his death. The result is a portrait of a man who become an artist despite, as much as because of, his fellow Kiwis. There are shots of Mason performing solo classic The End of the Golden Weather on his beloved Takapuna Beach, and insights from a cast of Kiwi theatrical heavyweights. In an extended interview with The Listener's Helen Paske, Mason ranges from his works looking at Māori-Pākehā relations, to over the top reaction to controversial tele-play The Evening Paper.

Jack Winter's Dream

Television, 1979 (Full Length)

Jack Winter's Dream is an unusual entry in the library of government filmmakers the National Film Unit: a poetic account of drink-fuelled males telling tales, adapted from a radio play by James K Baxter. Built around themes of age, death and love, the hour-long film starts with an old swagman bedding down in the ruins of an Otago pub. Time drifts: back to the night a newly rich goldminer found himself swapping memories and reveries — some of which unfurl on screen — with three drinkers and the barman (Bernard Kearns). But which one of them is planning murder?

Clare O'Leary

Director

Clare O'Leary is a politically-motivated, award-winning documentary filmmaker. Her documentaries, made in Australia and New Zealand, aim to  give a voice to those who are seldom heard.

Graeme Tetley

Writer

Graeme Tetley began his long scriptwriting career with Vigil, one of the most acclaimed New Zealand films of the 1980s. He went on to co-create police show Shark in the Park, collaborate extensively with director Gaylene Preston (Ruby and Rata, Bread and Roses), and co-write Out of the Blue, the story of the Aramoana massacre. Tetley passed away on 13 March 2011.

Stephen McCurdy

Composer

Composer Stephen McCurdy's screen music has crossed the gamut — from jazz, chamber pieces, rock, and pop, to the faux Peggy Lee song which opened each episode of 80s soap Gloss. McCurdy won NZ Film Awards for his scores to Came a Hot Friday and The End of the Golden Weather

Annie Collins

Editor

Editor Annie Collins worked on the Lord of the Rings trilogy, and won awards for her editing work on Scarfies and Out of the Blue. But she is also known for an extensive resume of documentaries, having edited such landmark productions as Patu! and The Neglected Miracle.

Rewa Harre

Cinematographer

Rewa Harre's work as camera operator and cinematographer encompasses documentary, shorts, commercials, and dramas for the big and small screen. Harre has worked extensively with directors Sima Urale (shooting acclaimed short O Tamaiti, and winning a Qantas Award in 2009 for her debut feature Apron Strings) and Athina Tsoulis (for whom he made his own feature debut, 1998's ensemble romp I'll Make You Happy). 

Glenis Giles

Producer

Glenis Giles has a wealth of experience as a producer and production manager. Her portfolio includes documentaries, film and television drama, children’s TV, commercials and music videos.

Raymond Thompson

Writer, Producer

Raymond Thompson, MNZM, has created and supervised a run of television shows since setting up base in New Zealand in the mid 90s. Longtime head of production company Cloud 9, he first began selling scripts in his native England. Thompson's series The Tribe, set in a world without adults, became a cult international hit, running for five seasons plus a sequel. His shows have sold to more than 130 countries.