Artist

Fur Patrol

Pop/rock band Fur Patrol first appeared on the NZ recording scene with the EP Starlifter in 1998. The EP got the four-piece some notice, but it was their debut album Pet that really got things going. The striking hit single 'Lydia' was the most played song on NZ radio that year, and the band finished the year with four NZ Music Awards. The almost obligatory shift to Australia followed, with the band's second album Collider being recorded in Melbourne in 2003. The band has gone into recess these days, with singer Julia Deans now working solo.

Lydia

Fur Patrol, Music Video, 1999

Prolific music video director Jonathan King delivers a simple but finely-executed clip with this anthem for the jilted. Although the band act like nothing is wrong and pull off an artful mime, it soon becomes clear that they have no instruments. Shot in extremely narrow focus, singer Julia Deans' sometimes wistful, sometimes sneering performance matches the brooding tone of the song, which topped the Kiwi charts despite initial disinterest from mainstream radio. The clip was shot at Verona Cafe on Auckland's K Road. 'Lydia' marked the third single from the band's first album Pet.

Andrew

Fur Patrol, Music Video, 2001

The lead off track from Wellington band Fur Patrol’s debut album Pet (and follow up to their chart topping single ‘Lydia’) sees an unrepentant Julia Deans emphatically despatching someone who has wronged her for the last time. The video — shot in a club on Auckland’s Karangahape Road — sets Deans and bandmates amidst frozen bar patrons who spring to life with the first tempo change. The band responds with an (almost) accomplished dance routine in best boy band style ... nicely undermined by Deans’ rather graceless tumble out of the final pose.

Dominoes

Fur Patrol, Music Video, 1998

This cascading pop song from Wellington band Fur Patrol’s debut EP Starlifter accompanies an early music video from director Greg Page. Julia Deans and her band mates appear mired in concrete in a suburban swimming pool which begins to fill — but they play on, apparently oblivious to the rising water. The pool was owned by neighbours of Page’s parents in Palmerston North, who were happy to indulge him, but it was Fur Patrol who suffered for Page’s art as they coped with water that was very cold and not especially clean.

Memories of Service 3 - Daniel Herlihy

Web, 2016 (Full Length Episode)

Daniel Herlihy’s naval career spanned 44 years, making him the longest continuous serving member of the New Zealand Navy. He joined in 1949, at the age of 14. Even before seeing active service in Korea he’d been involved in keeping New Zealand ports running, during the infamous 1951 waterfront dispute. Following significant action off Korea’s coasts, Daniel was later involved in the Suez Crisis and the Malayan Emergency. Later, while commanding a coastal patrol vessel, he took part in action against illegal Taiwanese fishing boats. At 82, Daniel recalls many details.

Gateway to New Zealand

Short Film, 1952 (Full Length)

“Only 40 hours by air from San Francisco and six from Sydney, Auckland New Zealand is on your doorstep.” In 1952, NZ tourism was also a long way from a core contributor to the national economy. A flying boat and passenger ship deposits visitors in the “Queen among cities” for this National Film Unit survey of Kiwi attractions. The potted tour takes in yachting, the beach, postwar housing shortage, school patrols, dam building and the War Memorial Museum, before getting out of town into dairy, racing and thermal wonderlands, where “you can meet some of our Māori people”.

Good Taste Made Bad Taste

Short Film, 1988 (Excerpts)

This documentary showcases some of the tricks of the trade used by Peter Jackson in the making of his first feature — the aliens-amok-in-Makara splatter classic, Bad Taste. Compiled following the film's 1988 Cannes market screening, it's framed around an extensive interview with a 25-year-old Jackson at his parents’ Pukerua Bay home. These excerpts offer fascinating insight into his ingenuity: from building a DIY Steadicam, to the making of the infamous sheep-obliterating rocket launcher scene, to PJ musing on the impetus that being an only child provided him. 

Dawn Raids

Television, 2005 (Full Length)

This documentary chronicles a shameful passage in New Zealand race relations: the controversial mid-70s raids on the homes and workplaces of alleged Pacific Island overstayers. Director Damon Fepulea’i examines its origins in Pacific Island immigration during full employment in the 1960s, when a blind eye was turned to visa restrictions. As times got tougher, that policy changed to include random street checks by police, despite official denials. Resistance by activists and media coverage helped end a policy which has had a long term effect on the Pacific Island community.

Memories of Service 5 - Ray Green

Web, 2017 (Full Length Episode)

Like many of his generation in the United Kingdom, Ray Green was called up for National Service. But it wasn’t until he and his mates were almost on the troopship heading to Korea in 1951, that they realised they were going to fight. Green’s Welsh regiment spent a full year in the combat zone. Danger was ever-present as they patrolled on pitch black nights with the enemy just two thousand metres away, or over the next hill. As he recounts in this interview, Green escaped death or injury on several occasions. He relives it every night, but says it was an adventure he wouldn’t have missed.

Memories of Service 4 - Dez Harrison

Web, 2017 (Full Length)

After a long flight in a C-130 Hercules, Dez Harrison arrived in Vietnam on the fifth of May 1967. As he puts it, when you’re young and green it’s all an adventure. Serving in 161 Field battery, Harrison says he was blessed with good leadership from non-commissioned officers who were mainly veterans of Korea and Malaya. As the memories rattle off, he has plenty of praise for the Americans in Vietnam, but less so for his Australian comrades. Stories of leave in Saigon and Singapore provide fond memories, but the reception back in New Zealand at the end of his service is less happy.