Attitude - Rotationplasty: My Backwards Foot

Television, 2014 (Full Length Episode)

In this Attitude episode, 14-year-old Sean Prendeville faces up to a complex and radical surgery: rotationplasty. For the bone cancer survivor the operation involves attaching his lower leg to the hip joint, rotating it and using the ankle as a ‘hinge’ for a prosthetic limb. The programme tracks the nature-mad Sean’s journey, from pre-surgery anxiety to rehab on his backwards right foot/knee; and the things that helped him through: his blue tongue lizard, challenge beads, Mum and family, and design student Jessica Quinn (who underwent the procedure when she was younger).

Interview

Peter Burger: On calling the shots...

Interview, Camera and Editing – James Coleman

Peter Meteherangi Tikao Burger (Ngāi Tahu, Rangitane) can thank a childhood lisp for his busy career as a screen director today. Having been sent to speech lessons, he found himself in the wrong class, and discovered the joys of performance in a drama class at a young and impressionable age. Since then, Burger has directed numerous film and television productions, including Until Proven Innocent, which won five Qantas awards in 2009, The Tattooist, Fish Skin Suit, short film Turangawaewae, staring the late Wi Kuki Kaa, as well as the TV series Outrageous Fortune, Go Girls and The Cult.

Walkshort

Short Film, 1987 (Full Length)

This classic short film provides an unusual showcase for the founding talents of musical theatre group The Front Lawn — Harry Sinclair and Don McGlashan. The duo play every character in this slice of life set amongst the pedestrians of Auckland's Karangahape Road. The narrative unravels like a baton relay. Walkshort was directed by editor Bill Toepfer. Sinclair would go on to do some directing of his own (Topless Women Talk about their Lives), while as lead singer of the Mutton Birds, McGlashan sang an ode to another famous Auckland street, Dominion Road. 

Smash Palace

Film, 1981 (Trailer and Excerpts)

Smash Palace is a Kiwi cinema classic and launched Roger Donaldson's American career. Al Shaw (a brilliant, brooding Bruno Lawrence) is a racing car driver who now runs a wrecker's yard in the shadow of Mount Ruapehu. His French wife Jacqui is unhappy there and leaves him, taking up with Al's best mate. When she restricts Al's access to his young daughter, his frustration explodes and he goes bush with the girl, desperate not to lose her too. "There's no road back" runs the tagline. New Yorker critic Pauline Kael called the film "amazingly accomplished".

Crush

Film, 1992 (Trailer and Excerpts)

Crush is a tale of simmering sexuality set in Rotorua. Moral or sexual ambiguity pervades the narrative of conflicted desire. Its mix of blocked-up writer, spurting mud-pools, infatuated teen, eel farm, American femme fatale (Marcia Gay Harden), noir motels, limp pongas and wheelchairs, plays out in a symbolic NZ landscape not seen before (or since). Director Alison Maclean's debut feature (which she co-wrote with Anne Kennedy) played in competition at the Cannes Film Festival.

Bridget Ikin

Producer

Producer Bridget Ikin has made a habit of championing Antipodean women filmmakers with original visions, from Alison Maclean (Kitchen Sink) to Jane Campion (An Angel at My Table) and Australian Sarah Watt (Look Both Ways). Since leaving New Zealand in the early 1990s, Ikin has been influential in Australian television and film, including programming public broadcasting network SBS.