Collection

The Peter Jackson Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Peter Jackson has gone from shy fanboy to master of his craft; from Pukerua Bay to Wellywood. With six journeys into Middle-earth now behind him, he has few peers in the realm of large scale filmmaking. Led by early 'behind the scenes' docos this collection pays tribute to PJ's journey, from re-making King Kong in his backyard to err ... re-making King Kong in his backyard. 

Collection

Cover Songs

Curated by NZ On Screen team

The Beatles, Hendrix, The White Stripes, Cat Power, Aretha...popular music is strewn with acts for whom a cover song has proven no compromise to credibility. This collection proves that popular music in New Zealand is no different. Alongside chart toppers from The Holidaymakers, Tex Pistol and cover queens When the Cat's Away, Crummer does Clapton, Jon Steven goes slightly Jamaican, Head Like a Hole do Springsteen — and  'Nature' and 'Shoop Shoop' get soome added guitars.

Collection

Speed

Curated by NZ On Screen team

It seems a fascination with going fast is built into human DNA. Covering distance in the shortest amount of time has long captured our imagination. From muscle-powered freaks of nature (thoroughbred horses, falcons, Peter Snell) to motorhead mayhem, from Formula 1 legends to front-running design innovation, this collection celebrates the particularly Kiwi 'need for speed'. 

Series

Our World

Television, 1984–1991

Our World was a long-running Sunday night slot on TV One dedicated to nature programming. Many iconic nature documentaries screened in the slot from international series such as David Attenborough’s The Living Planet, to local classics from the Wild South series, Peter Hayden-presented Journeys Across Latitude 45 South, and David Bellamy championing all things natural NZ. The shows were introduced by Gael Ludlow and the opening titles feature the fondly-remembered Jean Michel Jarre synthpop track that was Our World’s signature.

Seven Black Robins

Television, 1981 (Full Length)

By 1976 there were only seven Chatham Islands black robins left. It was the world's rarest bird. In a bid to save the species, the surviving birds were taken from one island to another more hospitable island in a desperate rescue mission. This was part of an incredible conservation success story led by Don Merton and his NZ Wildlife Service team. Seven Black Robins and Project Takahē captured viewers' imaginations as part of an acclaimed series of 'rare bird' films that screened on TV series Wild South. They helped forge the reputation of TVNZ’s Natural History Unit (later NHNZ).

Landscape in Stamps

Short Film, 1977 (Full Length)

Philatelists will delight in this artful National Film Unit production, where stamps are used as a perforated frame for showcasing a pictorial parade of NZ landscapes. The film offers an impressionistic take on the theme, with the landscapes (natural and human) further coloured by poetry and music. Coming from a time before electronic mail, Landscape in Stamps features readings from the work of international poets with scenic sympathies (Whitman, Frost, Thoreau, and more), and the music of composers Vaughan Williams, Handel, Beethoven and Mendelssohn.

Series

Moa's Ark

Television, 1990

Why is New Zealand's landscape and flora and fauna so unique? In four-part series Moa's Ark, renowned English naturalist David Bellamy, with his impassioned enthusiasm and trademark beard (of "old man's beard must go" fame) goes on a journey to discover the answer. Directed and produced by Peter Hayden, this 1990 TV series was produced by Television New Zealand's award-winning Natural History Unit (now independent production company NHNZ). Read more about the series here. 

Moa's Ark : Building the Ark

Television, 1990 (Full Length)

‘Moa's Ark' set sail 80 million years ago. David Bellamy becomes an ancient mariner and retraces the voyage of the islands of New Zealand (using contemporary science as his guide). In this first episode he finds out why New Zealand is called the Shaky Isles, gets face to face with the "living fossil" the tuatara, is inspired by meat pies, and discovers geography as he competes in the annual Coast to Coast race over the Southern Alps — with directional and gorse eradication aid coming from legendary race organiser Robin Judkins.

Moa's Ark : Stamp of the Giants

Television, 1990 (Full Length)

As an eight-year-old, a postage stamp of the giant kauri Tāne Mahuta offered English TV presenter David Bellamy his first introduction to New Zealand. In this episode of Moa’s Ark, Bellamy attempts to hug the nearly 14 metre girth of the tree, and explores Aotearoa's ancient forests and the fight to save them from destruction — including campaigns to save Whirinaki and Puerora Forests, when protestors chained themselves to enormous totara to prevent their milling. The episode also features a extraterrestrial underwater forest, deep under Milford Sound.

Royal Albatross

Short Film, 1980 (Full Length)

This award-winning National Film Unit production soars on thermals with the world's largest seabird, the toroa or royal albatross. Director Grant Foster captures the majesty of the flyer with a three metre-plus wingspan (“as wide as two volkswagen cars parked side by side”); laments historic slaughter; celebrates conservation efforts (hat tipping legendary toroa custodian Dr Lance Richdale); and surveys the albatross's life cycle at its only mainland breeding colony on Otago Peninsula, from courtship and nesting to taking off on an epic oceanic OE.