Off the Rails - Good as Gold (Episode 10)

Television, 2004 (Full Length Episode)

Marcus Lush travels from the vast Kaingaroa Forest to New Zealand's busiest rail junction (at Hamilton), in this instalment of his popular show about the country's railways. Along the way, he meets a legless train accident survivor turned motivational speaker; potter Barry Brickell and his 3km narrow gauge railway at Driving Creek in the Coromandel; and a collector with more than 2,700 rail related items. There's also a visit to Waihi. Transformed into a boomtown by gold and rail in the 1870s, it was home to the might and power of the Victoria stamper battery.

Woodville (Episode One)

Web, 2013 (Full Length Episode)

This online mockumentary series sees Sid (played by Byron Coll of “Nonu, Nonu, Nonu. Boom!” Mastercard ad fame) receive Woodville Arts Council funding to document a landmark David vs Goliath legal battle won by the town against BPC, a Belgian petrochemical giant. This pilot episode sees Sid meet the locals and introduce the story of how they beat “the muscles from Brussels”. Clayweaver Productions received funding from NZ On Air’s digital media fund Ignite to produce the six short ‘webisodes’; Woodville was selected for indie film festival Raindance in 2013.

Blue Willow

Short Film, 2005 (Full Length)

Veialu Aila-Unsworth directs this re-imagining of the ubiquitous blue and white ‘willow china’ ceramic pattern (designed by Thomas Minton in the late 18th Century). Aila-Unsworth’s exquisite animation uses the design as a tableau for a tragic tale. It tells the story — supposedly derived from an ancient Chinese folktale — of lovers fleeing an angry father. The doomed pair are ultimately transformed into birds by the gods, finally escaping from oppression ... and bangers and mash. Blue Willow was selected for the Berlin Film Festival (Kinderfest section).

Survey - Where Have All the Wowsers Gone?

Television, 1972 (Full Length)

In the early 1970s expat broadcaster Michael Dean took Aotearoa’s pulse, as it loosened its necktie and moved from “ice-cream on mutton, swilled around in tea” conservatism, towards a more cosmopolitan outlook. Dean asks the intelligentsia (James K Baxter, Tim Shadbolt, Peter Cape, Shirley Smith, Bill Sutch, Ian Cross, Peter Beaven, Pat Hanly, Syd Jackson, Hana Te Hemara) for their take. The questions range from “what does the family in Tawa sit down to eat these days?” to the Māori renaissance. Dean had made his name in the 60s, as a high profile broadcaster with the BBC.

Who Was Here Before Us?

Television, 2000 (Full Length)

Aotearoa is the last big land mass on earth discovered and settled by people (orthodox history suggests Māori arrived around 1280). Directed by Mark McNeill, this Greenstone TV documentary examines controversial evidence put forward to claim an alternative pre-Māori settlement — from cave drawings and carvings, to rock formations and statues. Historians, scientists, museum curators, and amateur archaeologists weigh up the arguments, DNA, carbon, and oral stories of the early Waitaha people, to sift hard fact from mysticism and hope.

Woodville (Episode Six)

Web, 2013 (Full Length Episode)

This six-part web series about a small town rising up against big business reaches its heartwarming conclusion in this episode. Sid (Byron Coll), is shooting the last few scenes of his doco on the proud Tararua town (including one with a frisky dog which is meant to be dying). Bella (Vanessa Stacey) makes her entrance as the Brockovich-ian lawyer who saves the day. As the town gathers for an open-air screening of the finished film, Sid gets another chance at love. Woodville, written by Christopher Brandon, was selected for London’s Raindance Festival in 2013.  

The Big Art Trip - Series One, Episode One

Television, 2001 (Full Length Episode)

This is the opening episode of this arts series which teamed “expert” Douglas Lloyd-Jenkins with “everyman” (and screenwriter) Nick Ward — and sent them on a road trip in search of artistic talent all around NZ. First stop is Northland which is “teeming with artists” as the pair encounter corrugated iron sculptor Jeff Thomson, potter Richard Parker, the iconic Hundertwasser toilets in Kawakawa, Manos Nathan who fuses traditional Maori design and ceramics, and Zealandia — Terry Stringer’s remarkable and “beautifully coiffeured” sculpture garden, studio and home.

Survey - What Happened at Oruaiti

Television, 1972 (Full Length)

In the early 1960s two North Island schools — Oruaiti and Hay Park — experimented with an innovative method of practical education. This episode of Survey sees principal Elwyn Richardson revisiting Oruaiti, and reminiscing on how the two schools functioned. He offers his views on traditional textbook learning — the more “American” system, as he calls it. Ex students reflect on their time at the school, and how an education based on arts, building and play shaped the people they’ve become. Modern schooling in Aotearoa now follows the example set in those early days.

Peter Sinclair

Presenter

For three decades Peter Sinclair was one of New Zealand’s leading TV presenters. A radio announcer by training, he was the face of music television, fronting Let’s Go, C’mon and Happen Inn from 1964 to 1973. He reinvented himself as a quiz show host with Mastermind — and hosted telethons and beauty contests until the mid 90s. Sinclair returned to radio and wrote an online column until his death in August 2001.