Interview

Bruce Allpress: A Kiwi character...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Veteran actor Bruce Allpress has had a long career in theatre, film and television. His television credits include Close to Home, Hanlon, Shark in the Park, Duggan, The Cult, and the lead role in the series Jocko. His many film appearances include The Piano, Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, and Rest for the Wicked.

Arithmetic

Brooke Fraser, Music Video, 2004

The clip for this single off Brooke Fraser’s seven time platinum selling album debut What to do with Daylight works from a simple concept. Accompanied by a string quartet, Fraser sings sweetly from behind a grand piano in an empty studio. Most distinctive however is the clip's liberal use of fairy lights, which cover the studio wall, the piano and the string quartet. This abundance didn’t go unnoticed: children's show Studio 2 gave Arithmetic the (satirical) award for “most use of fairy lights in a video clip”. The song reached number eight on the New Zealand Singles Chart.

Interview

Greg Johnson: Stand-up comic to award-winning actor...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Actor Greg Johnson began his career as a stand-up comedian. His first acting role was in the film The End of the Golden Weather. Since then, he has appeared in a wide range of TV shows, films and commercials, and is perhaps best known for roles in Shortland Street, Outrageous Fortune and Go Girls. He has won two acting awards, for performances in TV series City Life, and 2010 movie The Insatiable Moon.

Artist

Brooke Fraser

The daughter of an ex All Black, Brooke Fraser skipped the playing field for piano lessons at seven, began crafting her songwriting skills at 12 and was learning acoustic guitar at 15. In 2003 her debut album What to Do with Daylight topped the NZ charts and went gold. It was followed by Albertine (2006), which provided a global launch pad. Third album Flags (lead by single ‘Something in the Water’) achieved global success, and reached number three in Australia. Brutal Romantic followed in 2014. In 2018, under married name Brooke Ligertwood, she shared a Grammy Award for christian song 'What a Beautiful Name'.

Hold Me 1

Able Tasmans, Music Video, 1990

This Able Tasmans single starts with a piano intro from Graeme Humphreys (aka Graeme Hill ) — the so-called baroque popsters really loved their keyboards. The clip goes on to showcase the instrumental prowess of a band who weren't afraid to throw horns, bagpipes, and strings into the mix. The first vocal doesn't arrive until almost two minutes in! Director Phillipa Anderton captures the energy of the playing by weaving the camera above and around the musicians. The clip's use of colour is also distinctive: most obviously in a set which is revealed to be yellow and deep blue.

Loose Change

Grayson Gilmour, Music Video, 2009

Shot by Jesse Taylor Smith on 16mm on an antique Russian Krasnogorsk camera, Loose Change features a succession of movies within movies until it seems that everyone and everything could be on a set (apart, perhaps, from the photographer in the pig's head). Piano and glockenspiel build, crash and ebb as a model helicopter fights a fire in a building (life nearly imitated art when the stovetop pyrotechnics got out of hand); and, at the meta-end, the couple watching the "Stay Indoors" message on the TV are themselves revealed to be outside on a footpath.

Making Music - James and Donald Reid (The Feelers)

Short Film, 2005 (Full Length)

In this episode from a series for secondary school music students, James Reid (from The Feelers) and his brother Donald (a singer-songwriter who has co-written several Feelers songs) recall their school days when music making was frowned on by guidance counsellors rather than encouraged by projects like this one. Armed with acoustic guitars and a piano, they play excerpts from four songs (‘Communicate’, ‘We Raised Hell’, ‘Fishing For Lisa’ and ‘Unleash the Fury’) and discuss their philosophy of songwriting which is “all about being in the moment”.

Cannes '92

Television, 1992 (Full Length)

Cannes is the place where art meets schlock on the French Riviera. A year before Jane Campion's The Piano shared the festival's top prize, NZ-made documentary Cannes '92 managed to snare almost everyone standing, from Voight to Van Damme — including NZ entrants Alison Maclean (with her movie Crush) and Nicky Marshall (Mon Desir). Vincent Ward mentions the 14 companies involved in his Map of the Human Heart. Baz Luhrmann promotes Strictly Ballroom; Paul Verhoeven completely forgets the question after his Basic Instinct star Sharon Stone interrupts proceedings with a kiss.

Came a Hot Friday

Film, 1984 (Excerpts)

“The funniest, liveliest, most exuberant film ever made in New Zealand”. So said critic Nicholas Reid, a year after Came a Hot Friday became 1985's biggest local hit. Though Billy T’s loony Mexican-Māori cowboy is beloved by fans, he is but one eccentric here among many — as two scheming conmen hit town, and encounter bookies, boozers, country hicks, nasty crim Marshall Napier, and Prince Tui Teka playing saxophone. Until the arrival of The Piano in 1993, Ian Mune and Dean Parker’s award-loaded adaptation remained NZ's third biggest local hit. Ian Pryor writes about the film here.

Dreaming

Scribe, Music Video, 2004

After his hard-hitting debut single 'Stand Up' and the hit remix of 'Not Many', Scribe took a gentler approach on the third single from his five times platinum debut album. Rolling clouds open the music video, which trades bombastic beats and ominous synth tones for gentler piano. The chart-topping hook, originally written for Che Fu, was sung by Scribe himself after encouragement from collaborator P-Money. Photos from Scribe’s childhood appear on screen while he raps about the struggle to realise his potential, before glimpses of 'making of' footage from previous videos.