Koha - Hone Tuwhare

Television, 1981 (Full Length Episode)

This 1981 Koha documentary, 'No Ordinary Bloke' — poet Hone Tuwhare — reflects on his life and influences in a wide-ranging interview by Selwyn Muru. He recites poems and is shown walking around his Dunedin haunts, where he was living at the time. Tuwhare recounts his early life as a railway workshop apprentice and tells of the workshop library that opened his eyes to the world. Later he’s shown with mate and artist Ralph Hotere and discusses, with emotion, the nature of Māori relationships with the land in light of the then-proposed Aramoana aluminium smelter.

Loading Docs 2017 - He Kākano Ahau: From the Spaces in Between

Web, 2017 (Full Length)

Every year pride parades celebrate LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex) culture and pride. But Wellington takatāpui (Māori LGBTI) activist, Kassie Hartendorp, feels alienated from the flamboyant festivity. "It’s glittery, it’s fun, it’s fabulous. It feels empty. I don’t really know what the point is sometimes, you know.” In this Loading Doc short documentary, Hartendorp talks about wanting pride celebrations to be more inclusive of takatāpui. She faces a dilemma when her takatāpui kapa haka group are invited to perform at the Wellington Pride Parade. 

Te Ao Kapurangi (Warrior Woman)

Short Film, 2001 (Full Length)

This short film draws on a key incident in the life of Te-Ao-kapurangi, a woman of mana for Te Arawa's people. In the late nineteenth century, Aotearoa was in the grip of a 'musket war'; firearms were having a devastating effect in tribal battles. Hongi, a Ngāpuhi chief, leads a well-armed assault on a rival Te Arawa tribe. Te-Ao-kapurangi (Stephanie Grace) challenges Hongi and uses her wits, not a gun, to save her people. Invited to prestigious French festival Clermont-Ferrand, the film marked a rare drama directing credit for the late Tama Poata, writer of landmark Māori film Ngāti.

Holding You

Ginny Blackmore and Stan Walker, Music Video, 2014

Inspired by the legend of Ranginui and Papatuanuku — and two attractive singers — director Jessica Sanderson pulls out the stops with this video, which features galaxies, moons, and the circling star wattage of Stan Walker and Ginny Blackmore. Stan and Ginny play lovers who can’t exist in the same space without the potential for havoc, with Walker representing water and earth and Wigmore the sky. Co-written by the two artists, ‘Holding You’ became a number one hit in New Zealand, and was the most downloaded song on local iTunes on its first morning of release.  

Gaylene Barnes

Editor, Director

Filmmaker and artist Gaylene Barnes has used her grab bag of skills on film sets, in editing suites, and as a painter and multi-media artist. Nominated for awards as both a production designer and an editor, Barnes has also directed everything from Hunger for the Wild to documentaries and animated shorts.

Kathleen Gallagher

Director, Writer

Kathleen Gallagher began writing plays after discovering how few women playwrights there were. Politicised by the kindness of (often poor) strangers met on travels overseas, she has gone on to write 15+ plays, poetry, and a novel. Gallagher has also directed a number of documentaries reflecting her interest in the environment, spirituality, and the peace movement. In 2009 she began her trilogy of Whisperer environmental films. In 2017 Gallagher and colleague Gaylene Barnes completed their Canterbury rivers film Seven Rivers Walking - Haere Mārire. It was invited to debut at the 2017 Christchurch Film Festival.  

Mike Single

Camera, Director

Natural history and adventure cameraman Mike Single has worked everywhere from Death Valley to Antarctica, and filmed everything from BASE jumping to the birthplace of kung fu. A long association with company NHNZ has scored him a swag of awards, including an International Emmy for his Antarctic film The Crystal Ocean. Single's work has screened on Discovery Channel and National Geographic.

Alun Bollinger

Cinematographer

Alun Bollinger, MNZM, has been crafting the slanting southern light onto film and other formats, for almost 40 years. He is arguably New Zealand's premier cinematographer; images framed by Bollinger's camera include some of the most indelible memories to come from iconic films like Goodbye Pork Pie, Vigil and Heavenly Creatures.