The City And The Suburb (part one)

Television, 1983 (Full Length)

In this two-part Lookout documentary from 1983, critic Hamish Keith explores how New Zealanders have housed themselves over the 20th Century. This first part builds to 1935: it begins in Auckland War Memorial Museum, with Keith asking how Kiwis would represent themselves if they were curators in the future. He presents the state house as the paramount Kiwi icon, and examines the journey from Victorian slums and Queen Street sewers to villas, bungalows and suburbia; plus the impact on housing of cars, consumerism, influenza, war, depression, and new ideas in town planning.

Encounter - A Question of Principle

Television, 1976 (Excerpts)

The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) was waged between Republicans and General Franco’s Nationalists. Thousands of volunteers from around the globe joined the fight, mostly on the Republican side. These excerpts from a 1976 documentary on the 20 or so Kiwi veterans of the conflict feature Joan Conway, who reflects on the death of her brother Griff Maclaurin fighting the fascists; Tom Spiller, another International Brigade soldier; socialist George Jackson, who discusses official apathy from the NZ Government, and Geoffrey Cox, who wrote a book about the war.

Intrepid Journeys - Nicaragua (Rawiri Paratene)

Television, 2005 (Excerpts)

While Rawiri Paratene was directing TV's Korero Mai, conversation turned to Intrepid Journeys, and he mentioned offhandedly that he'd love to be a presenter. At the end of the day Paratene got an urgent message to call his agent: the Intrepid producers wanted him to guide an episode. Weeks later he found himself in Nicaragua, engaging with the people, places and troubled history of the country. But as this excerpt shows, it is the children who will live on in his memory. Paratene proves himself a generous host, revealing something of himself as much as Nicaragua.

Sunday - Sagrada Familia

Television, 1992 (Excerpts)

The timeline for building Barcelona cathedral La Sagrada Família spans decades. Architect Antoni Gaudí died in 1926, when it was less than a quarter complete. In 1992 arts show Sunday talked to Kiwi Mark Burry, a longtime principal architect on the famed basilica. Burry talks about being won over by Gaudí at university — when Gaudí was out of vogue — working on the project remotely, and trying to understand Gaudí's intentions for a design that has evolved with time. Meanwhile narrator Ray Henwood waxes lyrical over images of the cathedral and other Gaudí creations.

Artist

Timmy Trumpet and Savage

This ANZAC musical collaboration saw Sydney-born house DJ and brass player Timmy Trumpet team up with South Auckland-raised rapper Savage. Trumpet (real name Timothy Jude Smith) scored an international reputation as a house DJ, after playing brass solos over dance tracks during sets on the Spanish party island of Ibiza. After leaving Deceptikonz, Kiwi hip hop star Savage tasted international chart success with his 2005 solo single ‘Swing’. ‘Freaks' topped the charts in Aotearoa, made it to number three in Australia, and won notice in Europe. It won Highest Selling Single at the 2015 NZ Music Awards.

Blue Meanies

Opossom, Music Video, 2012

This single for Mint Chick Kody Nielson's solo project possibly takes its name from the music-hating creatures in Beatles movie Yellow Submarine, or a Balinese mushroom with mind-altering properties. Or both. Director Sam Kristofski's video for this shimmering neo-60s pop song — captioned a "Sci-Fi-Delic Experience" — is in the ‘hipster surrealist’ mode (typified by Spanish collective CANADA). Model Zippora Seven hikes in the woods, overseen by a golden Buddha with laser beam eyes worthy of Flash Gordon. The trippy animation is by Daniel Foothead. 

Bliss

Th' Dudes, Music Video, 1980

With a chorus to do any football terrace proud, the final single from Th’ Dudes (featuring Dave Dobbyn, Peter Urlich and Ian Morris) became one of the great Kiwi drinking songs. It was actually written in Sydney to parody hard-drinking pub crowds; the lyrics namecheck Sydney landmarks (The Coogee, The Cross) and delights unavailable back home (Spanish shoes, falafel). Shot in Wellington's booze barn-like Cricketers’ Arms, the video showcases the excitement of the band’s live show, and offers a snapshot of bar culture in early 80s New Zealand.

Flare - A Ski Trip

Short Film, 1977 (Full Length)

This short documentary about freestyle skiing was directed for the NZ Tourist and Publicity Department by Sam Neill (who would shortly achieve fame as an actor). This was one of several docos directed by Neill while at the National Film Unit; other subjects included the Red Mole theatre troupe and architect Ian Athfield. The skiers put on daring displays of their 'art' in locations including Mount Hutt, Queenstown and Tongariro National Park. 70s snow-styles (and beards) abound. The film was translated into French, Japanese, Italian, German and Spanish.

Braindead

Film, 1992 (Trailer)

After his mother gets infected by a bite from a deadly Sumatran rat monkey, Lionel (Almighty Johnson Tim Balme, in an award-winning performance) has to contend with a plague of the living dead while attempting to woo the love of his life. Peter Jackson had already been tagged with the title  ‘The Sultan of Splatter’ after his first two features, but this was the film that confirmed it. Armed with a decent budget, he takes a Flymo to fusty 1950s New Zealand and takes cinematic gore to a whole new extreme in the process.

Peter Hawes

Writer, Presenter

A proud son of the West Coast, Peter Hawes was a fixture on New Zealand television in the late 70s and early 80s. After writing for A Week of It, he presented Yours for the Asking, giving free rein to his irreverent wit and fondness for wordplay as he sought answers to viewer questions. Hawes also wrote extensively for the theatre and authored a number of well-received novels. He passed away in October 2018.