Point Your Toes, Cushla!

Short Film, 1998 (Full Length)

Point Your Toes, Cushla! captures a girl's eye view of the final minutes before she goes on stage in a ballet contest — where one wrong move could be a short cut to humiliation. In this case the danger is heightened thanks to a stage mother whose idea of encouragement is constant meddling (played in scene-stealing brilliance by Alison Wall). Low on dialogue but rich in detail, this film by Simon Marler was invited to a number of overseas festivals, where it won a jury diploma in St Petersburg. It also got general release in Kiwi cinemas. 

Collection

The Peter Jackson Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Peter Jackson has gone from shy fanboy to master of his craft; from Pukerua Bay to Wellywood. With six journeys into Middle-earth now behind him, he has few peers in the realm of large scale filmmaking. Led by early 'behind the scenes' docos this collection pays tribute to PJ's journey, from re-making King Kong in his backyard to err ... re-making King Kong in his backyard. 

Watermark

Short Film, 2001 (Full Length)

Damon Fepulea'i's directing debut follows Megan (Olivia Tennet from Maddigan's Quest), a young girl who finds herself out of her depth amongst the mangroves. While out exploring, she meets two siblings and wants to make friends, but one of them is hostile and argues over who owns a bamboo stake. Megan runs off to play alone and while trying to catch a fish using the stake as a spear, has an accident. She's full of stubborn pride as the tide rises dangerously around her. Watermark debuted at the 2002 Rotterdam Film Festival, and features classic Kiwi song ‘Blue Smoke’.

The Man Who Couldn't Dance

Short Film, 2005 (Full Length)

Writer-director Barry Prescott’s third short film might have been entitled Strictly Legless. Alge (Joe Taylor) is a double amputee with a photo of Fred Astaire above his bed, whose dreams of dancing appear unlikely until he gets some inventive help from his sister (Emma Kinane) and dance teacher (John Bach, in a nosy prosthetic). Featuring cameos from veteran actors Donna Akersten and Alice Fraser, the black comedy treads on some sensitive toes for humorous effect, while remaining warm-hearted. It won awards at festivals for the differently-abled worldwide.

Artist

Suzanne Paul

Irrepressible infomercial queen Suzanne Paul made her name selling products like Natural Glow on the small screen but she’s always been keen to diversify her media profile. As well as television acting, presenting and competing (Dancing with the Stars), she has dabbled a toe in the music industry (despite freely admitting that she thinks her singing sounds like a “strangled cat”). In 1994, she made an unsuccessful attempt to launch a dance craze with her novelty song ‘Blue Monkey’; and, in 1997, she covered Dave and the Dynamos’ ‘Life Begins at 40’.

This House Can Fit Us All

Little Pictures, Music Video, 2008

Filmed at 2008 music jamboree Camp A Low Hum, this music video features various camp attendees dancing and singing while listening to the song on headphones. It's an infectious clip for an exuberant track, capturing the BYO DIY vibe that made the indie festival's name. 'This House Can Fit Us All' was taken from Little Pictures' only album, Owl + Owl (2008). Indie blog Bigstereo called it “perfect DIY pop, all the tracks are real gems”, while another, Panda Toes, described it as “the cutest, most fun-loving music of 2008”. The Little Pictures duo broke up the following year.

Interview

Martin Henderson: From Kiwi child star to Hollywood...

Interview – Ian Pryor. Camera and Editing – Alex Backhouse

After making his screen debut in 1988 on Margaret Mahy TV series Strangers, actor Martin Henderson spent three years on Shortland Street playing Stuart Nielsen, then moved on to Australia and later the United States. Since then he has acted everywhere from India to Sweden, and in everything from horror (The Ring) to musicals (Bride and Prejudice) to TV’s House MD. His work as Cate Blanchett’s disabled brother in drama Little Fish saw him nominated for an Australian Film Institute supporting actor award. Variety magazine called his performance 'a revelation'.

Ralph Hotere

Short Film, 1974 (Full Length)

Directed by Sam Pillsbury, this 1974 film observes Ralph Hotere — one of New Zealand’s greatest artists — at a moment when excitement is gathering about his work. Lauded as a “classic” by Ian Wedde, the documentary is framed around the execution of a watershed piece: a large mural Hotere was commissioned to paint for Hamilton’s Founders Theatre. Interviews with friends and associates — poets Hone Tuwhare and Bill Manhire, art critics, officials and dealers — are intercut with fascinating shots of Hotere working (including making art by photocopying or 'xerography').

Simon Marler

Director, Producer

Simon Marler's film industry experience includes stints as a casting director, as a director of shorts and documentaries, and three years as head of New Zealand film organisation Script to Screen.

David Paul

Cinematographer

David Paul's work as a cameraman and director of photography covers the gamut, from documentary and dramas to shorts, commercials and feature films. His CV includes award-winning work on telemovies Tangiwai - A Love Story and Until Proven Innocent, plus Edmund Hillary miniseries Hillary.