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Clips (3)

  1. Part one of two from this full length documentary.

  2. Part two of two from this full length documentary.

Synopsis

This National Film Unit-made documentary records the 18-month-long building process of a waka taua (war canoe): from the felling of the trees — opening with an awe-inspiring shot of the giant totara selected by master carver Piri Poutapu — to the ceremonial launch. The waka was commissioned by Māori Queen, Te Arikinui Dame Te Atairangikaahu, and built at Turangawaewae Marae. The Harry Dansey-narrated film was significant in showing the currency of the canoe-building kaupapa alongside the everyday lives (at the freezing works, the pub) of the builders.

Credits (8)

 Harry Dansey
 David Sims
 David H Fowler

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Related Titles (8)

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Collections.   See all collections ›  

Included in:

 The Matariki Collection

Quotes

To learn is to respect, to participate in a heritage. So let us take this canoe as a symbol of collective spirit. 
Probably the first National Film Unit film to pass beyond the Integration Myth and begin an overt dichotomizing of Māori and Pākehā cultures. 
That sense of belonging, when your ancestors are present, and being proud of a civilisation which for the Māori leads back beyond the great ocean migration from Hawaiiki and beyond.