Jay Ryan played the mechanic who narrated hit series Go Girls, a man desperately trying to understand the minds of his female friends. Sometimes credited as Jay Bunyan, the Auckland-born actor had earlier won bit parts in Xena and an ongoing role on teen hit Being Eve, before crossing the Tasman. His work in Australian soap Neighbours was nominated for a Logie award. In 2012 Ryan began four seasons starring in an American TV update of Beauty and the Beast, as the survivor of a military experiment. In 2017 he joined black comedy Mary Kills People, as a terminally-ill patient caught up in romance.

I think he just wants to settle down with his wife or girl, have a family and become sensible Kev. However that doesn't quite happen... Jay Ryan, on his Go Girls role

Mary Kills People

2017, As: Joel Collins - Television

Method

2017, Associate Producer - Television

Top of the Lake

2013, As: Mark Mitcham - Television

Beauty and the Beast (US TV series)

2012 - 2016, As: Vincent Keller - Television

Lou

2010, As: Cosmo - Film

Offspring

2011, As: Fraser King - Television

Go Girls

2009 - 2012, As: Kevin - Television

Rachel Lang and Gavin Strawhan created Go Girls out of a desire for an upbeat show about "people who liked each other". Audiences liked the characters too: the show ran five seasons, after introducing us to a group of 20-something friends, each aiming to make a major life-change in the next year. Over five series various romantic adventures ensued, and the core cast of Anna Hutchison, Alix Bushnell, Bronwyn Turei, Jay Ryan and Matt Whelan were joined by others — before finally departing altogether, with one final season revolving around a new cast of wanna bes.

Go Girls - First Episode

2009, As: Kevin - Television

Go Girls starts from a twist, a beach and a promise. The twist is that this femme-dominated tale is narrated by a male (Jay Ryan). The promise involves four friends having a drink on the beach, and agreeing to make a major life-change within a year. Amy (Anna Hutchison) wants to be rich; whacky bartender Britta (Alix Bushnell) seeks fame; straight-talking Cody (Bronwyn Turei) wants a hubbie. The intentionally "optimistic, kind" hit show stretched to five seasons. In the backgrounder, co-creator Rachel Lang writes about the show's origins and difficult, rain-sodden birth.

Bleeders

2008, As: Finn - Short Film

Sea Patrol

2007 - 2009, As: Billy 'Spider' Webb - Television

Interrogation

2005, As: Constable Dean Salmon - Television

Being Eve - Being Upstaged

2002, As: Sam Hooper - Television

Being Eve was a popular and self-aware comedy-drama for teens. It launched the career of actor Fleur Saville, who played 15-year-old teen anthropologist Eve. This excerpt from episode 22 of series two sees angst and ambition collide, as Eve dreams of Hollywood success via a school Shakespeare production. Shakespeare himself makes a cameo (as Eve's muse), while she struggles with her original vision for the classic. But will she be upstaged by Sam? The series later won best drama at the 2005 NZ Screen Awards, and fostered young directing and producing talent.

Being Eve

2001 - 2002, As: Sam Hooper - Television

This quirky, upbeat comedy-drama looked at teen life through the eyes of 15-year-old Eve (Fleur Saville). Something of an amateur teen anthropologist, Eve questions everything in her world, musing on life to the camera. The series' fresh, self-aware style appealed directly to media-savvy teenagers. The TV3 series launched Saville's TV career, fostered young directing and producing talent, won many awards (including Best Drama Series at the 2002 NZ TV Awards) and was nominated for an International Emmy. It sold to over 40 territories, including the United States.

Scallywag Pirates

2000, As: Glen - Television

Jackson's Wharf

1999 - 2000, As: Zachary - Television

Created by Gavin Strawhan and Rachel Lang, Jackson’s Wharf was set in a fictional coastal town and revolved around a sibling rivalry between brothers Frank (the town cop) and Ben Jackson (a big smoke lawyer). Returning with his family, golden boy Ben has controversially inherited the local pub from his recently deceased father. Produced by South Pacific Pictures, the one hour popular drama screened for two seasons. Writer James Griffin and director Niki Caro worked on the show, alongside much of the talent who would later create Mercy Peak and Outrageous Fortune.

The Tribe

1999 - 2003, As: Blue - Television

One of the most successful television shows shot on Kiwi soil, The Tribe was the brainchild of British-born Raymond Thompson. In a future where the adults have been wiped out by a virus, the children that remain have formed into competing tribes, some of whom live to terrorise. Running five seasons, The Tribe sold to more than 120 territories, and the cast toured performances from the soundtrack for overseas fans. The cast were almost entirely New Zealanders, as were most of the crew. Sequel The New Tomorrow, following descendants of the original characters, screened in 2005.    

Xena: Warrior Princess

1995 - 2001, As: Zortis - Television

Neighbours

2002 - 2005, As: Jack Scully - Television