James Brown

Editor, Director

Since graduating from Elam School of Fine Arts in 2003, James Brown has edited documentaries for directors Thomas Burstyn, Briar March, Roger Donaldson (co-editing a documentary about motor racing legend Bruce McLaren) and Annie Goldson. In 2013 Brown shared an NZ Film Award with Goldson, for co-editing He Toki Huna: New Zealand in Afghanistan. He has also directed a trio of documentaries on teen rugby players from Los Angeles (the first was 2013 award-winner Red White Black & Blue), plus music videos and video blogs. His company Branch Out Media specialises in offline editing. 

Jennie Goodwin

Newsreader

Broadcaster Jennie Goodwin made history in June 1975, when she became the first woman in the Commonwealth to take on the national prime time news bulletin. The TV2 newsreader dispelled the belief that women lacked the authority to present network news. Goodwin left television in 1982, although she has made occasional return appearances.

Brian Cross

Camera

A National Film Unit cameraman for 36 years, Brian Cross worked on a large number of films, ranging from royal tours and rugby tours to industrial progress in forestry and electricity transmission, some as cameraman and director. He is particularly remembered for his record of the maiden voyage of HMNZS. Otago, and for his many films of New Zealand railways.Image credit: Archives New Zealand, ref AAQT 6421 B18889

Paul Leach

Camera

Paul Leach was the man behind the camera on many classic Kiwi films; author Duncan Petrie described him as New Zealand's "camera operator of choice". His CV spanned landmark titles Sleeping Dogs, Utu, Smash Palace, and breakthrough comedy Came a Hot Friday. He passed away on 10 April 2010.

Robyn Scott-Vincent

Producer, Director

Robyn Scott-Vincent, MNZOM, is longtime producer of Attitude, the globetrotting series that focuses on people living with a disability. Scott-Vincent has an extensive background as a journalist. Since 1992 she has headed her own production company, Attitude Pictures.

Annie Goldson

Director

Annie Goldson, NZOM, is probably New Zealand's most awarded documentary filmmaker. Her work — including the feature-length An Island Calling, Brother Number One and Kim Dotcom: Caught in the Web — often examines the political through the personal. Goldson's films have played widely overseas, and won awards in New Zealand, England, Spain, France, the Philippines and the United States.

Michele Fantl

Producer

Michele Fantl has been producing acclaimed documentaries, telemovies and features since the 1990s, often through her production company MF Films. Along the way she has worked extensively with writer/directors Stewart Main (50 Ways of Saying Fabulous), Garth Maxwell (When Love Comes) and Fiona Samuel (Bliss).

Dorothy McKegg

Actor

Dorothy McKegg’s acting and singing talent took her from Palmerston North to London, while she was still a teen. Back home, her acting career encompassed memorable screen roles in Carry Me Back, Middle Age Spread and Matrons of Honour, and theatre work at Mercury, Downstage and Circa. McKegg passed away in February 2008.

Clive Sowry

Archivist

Should Clive Sowry ever choose to enter Mastermind, his knowledge of the National Film Unit will give his competitors a definite run for their money. Sowry worked at the government filmmaking organisation for 14 years, including nine as the NFU's archivist. He went on to undertake a programme that saved 100s of local films, and has written often about filmmaking in New Zealand — including for NZ On Screen.  

Irene Wood

Actor

Irene Wood was showing her versatility from the early days of Kiwi television: by 1968 she had already been on screen presenting children's shows, singing, and playing Katherine Mansfield in TV play The White Gardenia. Since then Wood has acted in murder mystery SlipknotShortland Street, movie Rest for the Wicked, and won fans after playing Nan for five seasons of Go Girls.