Interview

ScreenTalk Short: Theresa Healey

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Actor Theresa Healey first appeared on screen as a presenter on Play School. She won a wider audience during five years playing Nurse Carmen Roberts on Shortland Street.

Interview

Tandi Wright: A lifetime in acting...

Interview, Camera and Editing – James Coleman

Tandi Wright spent some of her childhood in the dressing room at Avalon TV Studios - waiting for her actor parents to finish work on Close to Home. But rather than encouraging her to follow suit, Wright insists they were always 'realistic about how nearly impossible it is to make a career out of acting'. She agrees - but seems to have pulled off the impossible anyway. Wright has been acting for television since the age of six, playing lead roles in some of New Zealand’s top productions including Shortland Street, Willy Nilly, Being Eve, Serial Killers, Outrageous Fortune, This Is Not My Life and Nothing Trivial. Her film credits include Not Only But Always, Black Sheep, and Out of the Blue.

Interview

Mike Horton: Legendary film editor...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Mike Horton is an award-winning editor who has worked on some of New Zealand’s most beloved films. His CV includes classics Goodbye Pork Pie, Smash Palace, Utu and Once Were Warriors. Horton was nominated for an Oscar for editing Peter Jackson’s The Two Towers, and his one regret is not editing the final film of The Lord of the Rings trilogy.

Interview

Grant Tilly: A long career on screen and stage...

Interview - Ian Pryor. Camera and Editing - Alex Backhouse

Actor, acting teacher, and artist the late Grant Tilly played cow cockies, assassins, missionaries, and German villains in funny hats. And that’s not even counting his long-running stage career, which included a run of classic Kiwi plays, one of which became acclaimed movie Middle Age Spread.

Interview

Stuart Dryburgh: On good, old-fashioned camera tricks...

Interview and Editing - Gemma Gracewood. Camera - Mark Weston

Cinematographer Stuart Dryburgh is the eye behind some of the most iconic images in New Zealand film. His first job in the industry was as a 'general assistant' on Middle Age Spread. From there he worked as a gaffer on films including Smash Palace, Goodbye Pork Pie and Came A Hot Friday, before becoming a fully-fledged cinematographer, learning much of what he knows from his mentor Alun Bollinger, who operated the camera for him on The Piano. Since shooting The Piano, Dryburgh has been working overseas, returning to film In My Father’s Den in 2004.

Interview

Andrew Shaw: From kids show host to TVNZ executive...

Interview - Clare O'Leary. Camera and Editing - Leo Guerchmann

TV executive Andrew Shaw has more than three decades of experience in the New Zealand TV industry, from being a teen heart-throb presenter, to directing and producing, to sitting on top of the heap as an executive at TVNZ.

Interview

Peter Burger: On calling the shots...

Interview, Camera and Editing – James Coleman

Peter Meteherangi Tikao Burger (Ngāi Tahu, Rangitane) can thank a childhood lisp for his busy career as a screen director today. Having been sent to speech lessons, he found himself in the wrong class, and discovered the joys of performance in a drama class at a young and impressionable age. Since then, Burger has directed numerous film and television productions, including Until Proven Innocent, which won five Qantas awards in 2009, The Tattooist, Fish Skin Suit, short film Turangawaewae, staring the late Wi Kuki Kaa, as well as the TV series Outrageous Fortune, Go Girls and The Cult.

Interview

Brent Hansen: MTV, RWP, and the future of music...

Interview – Ian Pryor. Camera and Editing – Alex Backhouse

His favourite music videos include Joy Division’s Atmosphere and Tall Dwarfs’ Turning Brown and Torn in Two. And Brent Hansen has seen a lot of music videos. From producing famously eclectic Kiwi music show Radio with Pictures to rising through the ranks to become head of MTV Europe, Hansen has been a major player in putting music on screen.

Interview

Simon Prast: From playing the son to playing the father...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Simon Prast made his television debut in cop drama Mortimer’s Patch. Best known for playing spoilt rich kid Alistair Redfern in Gloss, Prast’s biggest film role was playing a gay man in 1998 movie When Love Comes. He also has a strong background in theatre, and for 11 years ran the Auckland Theatre Company.

Interview

John Barnett: A life in NZ film and television...

Interview - Clare O'Leary. Camera and Editing - Leo Guerchmann

Since the 1970s, producer John Barnett has been instrumental in bringing a host of uniquely Kiwi stories to local and international screens, from Fred Dagg to Footrot Flats, from Whale Rider to Sione’s Wedding and What Becomes Of The Broken Hearted?, from iconic soap Shortland Street to the wildly successful Westie family drama Outrageous Fortune.