Interview

Ian Hughes: On playing the sad clown...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Actor Ian Hughes made a big impact on our screens playing the ‘sad clown’ Ant in the acclaimed TV series and movie Topless Women Talk About Their Lives. From there, he went on to play a number of roles on television shows such as Shortland Street, Hercules, Xena, and Doves of War. He has also appeared in feature films including The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, and directed his own short film The Waiting Room.

Interview

Stuart Page: On making music videos...

Interview - James Coleman. Camera and Editing - Leo Guerchmann

Director, photographer and Axemen drummer Stuart Page is a prolific filmmaker, who has made over 40 music videos. Page has directed clips for Superette, The Clean, and The Skeptics’ infamous AFFCO. In 2009 he won Best Feature Documentary and Best Emerging filmmaker at the DocNZ International Film Festival for his film Shustak, a portrait of American photographer Laurence Shustak. Page also compiled alternative music compilation Noisyland.

Interview

Jackie van Beek - Funny As Interview

Jackie van Beek's CV is as impressive as it is long — she's a respected actor, writer, and director across comedy and drama, for stage, television and film.

Interview

Jackie van Beek: On the importance of chaos in filmmaking...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Jackie van Beek is an actor, director and writer who first honed her storytelling skills in theatre. She has acted in a variety of television and film roles, and directed several award-winning short films. In 2017 van Beek directed her first feature film The Inland Road, then co-wrote, co-directed and co-starred in hit comedy The Breaker Upperers, with Madeleine Sami.

Interview

Helene Wong - Funny As Interview

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story author Helene Wong grew up in 1950s Aotearoa, and has worked in the arts as a performer, writer, and film critic. She discusses her varied career in this Funny As interview, including: Growing up with radio comedy, being the class clown at school, and realising that you could make people laugh with voices and accents The university capping review being a revelation and a liberation — presenting an opportunity to deal with issues and being more than just "prancing about on the stage" How the introduction of television meant being able to see politicians — "their physicality, their flaws and their body language" – providing wonderful source material for satirists Working with Roger Hall, John Clarke, Dave Smith and Catherine Downes on university revue One in Five, and mimicking three-screen promotional film This is New Zealand to open the show Working for Prime Minister Robert Muldoon in the 70s as a social policy advisor – despite spending “the previous few years having a lot of fun satirising him”– and feeling that he had a "kind of dark force field around him" Reaching a turning point in comedy about Asians in New Zealand; Asians have started to "take back the power" and "as opposed to encouraging audiences to laugh at us, we’re now getting them to laugh with us"