Interview

Keith Quinn: The voice of New Zealand rugby...

Interview - Ian Pryor. Camera and Editing - Alex Backhouse

Keith Quinn is part of the fabric of Kiwi TV and sporting history. On hand to commentate and write about many of our key sports moments - rugby and otherwise - over almost four decades, Quinn called his first rugby match for TV in 1973, and was part of the 2011 Rugby World Cup team for Māori Television.

Interview

Jono Pryor & Ben Boyce - Funny As Interview

Jono Pryor and Ben Boyce both got their starts in TV comedy after stints at broadcasting school, before joining forces in 2012 to create long-running hit show Jono and Ben. Here they talk about their careers, including: Hating M*A*S*H but loving SportsCafe — and how Jono and Ben was a loose version of Marc Ellis and Matthew Ridge's TV partnership, only without the athleticism or business smarts Early forays into broadcasting, including a young Jono harassing Mai Fm DJ Robert Rakete until he was allowed on the radio, and Ben Boyce’s haphazard attempt at rugby commentary as a 19-year-old Ben discusses early creative endeavours including making movies on a farm as a kid, writing the "show us your crack" advert, and creating an early version of Pulp Sport at broadcasting school The perks of working with your best mate everyday on Jono and Ben, and getting to see younger talents from the show succeed — e.g. Guy Williams, Rose Matafeo, Laura Daniel and Jordan Watson (How to Dad) The challenges of transitioning from their 10pm time slot after 7 Days, to an hour of prime time at 7:30pm — and how Jono and Ben was hitting its stride in its seventh and final season How the internet is changing how comedy is viewed, and the difficulty of advertising executives always requesting “a viral video”

Interview

Tim Batt - Funny As Interview

After starting in radio, comedian Tim Batt found his place with podcasts, including The Worst Idea of All Time — New Zealand’s most globally successful podcast. He discusses podcasts in this Funny As interview, and also talks about: Watching a “painfully shy” Guy Williams perform his first stand-up show His first radio job, learning from legendary DJ Kevin Black The challenges of being a political comedian in a small democracy Comedians moving into the commentary space, and whether that's good for society Working with comedian Guy Montgomery on The Worst Idea of All Time How 7 Days made it respectable to be a comedian in New Zealand Being "livid" when youth channel TVNZ U was cancelled — after “honing some of the best comedians in our part of the world”

Interview

Helene Wong - Funny As Interview

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story author Helene Wong grew up in 1950s Aotearoa, and has worked in the arts as a performer, writer, and film critic. She discusses her varied career in this Funny As interview, including: Growing up with radio comedy, being the class clown at school, and realising that you could make people laugh with voices and accents The university capping review being a revelation and a liberation — presenting an opportunity to deal with issues and being more than just "prancing about on the stage" How the introduction of television meant being able to see politicians — "their physicality, their flaws and their body language" – providing wonderful source material for satirists Working with Roger Hall, John Clarke, Dave Smith and Catherine Downes on university revue One in Five, and mimicking three-screen promotional film This is New Zealand to open the show Working for Prime Minister Robert Muldoon in the 70s as a social policy advisor – despite spending “the previous few years having a lot of fun satirising him”– and feeling that he had a "kind of dark force field around him" Reaching a turning point in comedy about Asians in New Zealand; Asians have started to "take back the power" and "as opposed to encouraging audiences to laugh at us, we’re now getting them to laugh with us"

Interview

Matt Heath - Funny As Interview

Matt Heath was one of the key creative minds behind anarchic stunt comedy late night show Back Of The Y, before becoming a NZ Herald columnist, Radio Hauraki DJ, and comical cricket commentator. This interview includes: Heath's early love of The Young Ones and Badjelly the Witch — and later unconsciously plagiarising American movies on Back Of The Y Making stunt-laden short films Vaseline Warriors and Shafted with fellow Back of the Y creator Chris Stapp, while at university in Dunedin The long route to getting Back of the Y made — and how Bill Ralston almost cancelled the show before it debuted The many injuries that occured during filming, and worries that Stapp, who performed most of the stunts, had died several times Breaking guitars and ribs while on tour with musician Tim Finn Jeremy Wells coming up with the idea for the Alternative Commentary Collective, and the challenges of getting sports comedy funded in New Zealand

Interview

Vincent Burke: The power of local stories in film and television…

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

For roughly three decades Vincent Burke has been the man behind Top Shelf Productions. In that time he has helmed an impressive line up of screen projects. Among them are TV shows An Immigrant Nation, All About Eve, Cinema of Unease, Flatmates and Target.

Interview

Sharon Murdoch - Funny As Interview

Hailing from the deep south, political cartoonist Sharon Murdoch started out as a designer and came to cartooning later in life.

Interview

Jeremy Wells: A driving interview...

Interview, Camera and Editing – James Coleman

Jeremy Wells made his broadcasting debut on student radio station 95bFM, reading the news on Mikey Havoc’s breakfast show. The pair teamed up again for Havoc, a talk and music show on the fledgling MTV, before hosting travelogue/social commentary shows Havoc and Newsboy's Sell-Out Tour, and Havoc's Luxury Suites and Conference Facility on TVNZ. Wells then worked with producer/director Paul Casserly to produce seven seasons of the media satire show Eating Media Lunch, which won Best Comedy Programme at the Qantas Film and Television Awards in 2008. He also presented the satirical series The Unauthorised History Of New Zealand in 2005, and an episode of Intrepid Journeys in 2007.