Hooks and Feelers

Short Film, 1983 (Full Length)

Hooks and Feelers tells the story of a painter haunted by an accident in which her son lost a hand. Written and directed by Melanie Rodriga, the 45-minute psychological drama explores guilt and reconciliation as the family adjusts to his disability. An adaptation of the short story by future Booker Prize-winner Keri Hulme, Hooks and Feelers starred jazz singer Bridgette Allen and Keith Aberdein (Smash Palace). It screened on TV in 1984. With producer Don Reynolds, Rodriga (then known as Melanie Read) would go on to make pioneering feminist thriller Trial Run (1984).

Artist

Look Blue Go Purple

Look Blue Go Purple were part of Flying Nun’s ‘second wave’ (along with Doublehappys, The Verlaines and Sneaky Feelings). Formed in 1983 in a Dunedin practice room under a motorcycle shop, the band developed a distinctive style as they layered vocal harmonies, keyboards (and even flute) over trademark Dunedin guitar strum and backbeat. They released three EPs before calling it a day. Though they'd made a conscious call to play with other women, LBGP never labelled  themselves as a “feminist” or “girl” band, and grew tired of endlessly asked about gender in interviews. “Gender has nothing to do with it.”

Our People Our Century - Cradle to Grave

Television, 2000 (Excerpts)

This episode of the Kiwi social history series explores the importance of the ‘cradle to grave' beliefs about education, health and social welfare that have underpinned NZ governance since the 1930s. But radical reforms toward the end of the 20th century were more focused on individual opportunity than the wider social contract. Excerpts here use influential unionist James ‘Big Jim’ Roberts and generations of his family to chart social change. Written by feminist Sandra Coney, this episode also provides an overview of the monumental change in the lives of women.

The Living Room - Series Two, Episode Ten

Television, 2004 (Full Length Episode)

This final episode from series two of the arts series is presented by Taika Cohen (aka Taika Waititi) and his alter ego, silly German Gunter Schliemann. Taika makes short film Tama Tū, performs as vampire Diego (later reborn in What We Do in the Shadows) and performs Taika’s Incredible Show at Bats Theatre. Included are scenes from his early, little-seen short film John & Pogo. Also featured are artist Siren Maclaine (aka Siren Deluxe) and her feminist erotica; Caroline Robinson’s large-scale Auckland motorway sculptures; and comics artist Colin Wilson (Judge Dredd, Blueberry).

The Gravy - Series One, Episode 12

Television, 2007 (Full Length Episode)

This NSFW episode of Sticky Pictures' award-winning arts series is dedicated to exploring the 'sexy side' of buttoned-down New Zealand — from traditional burlesque to erotic sculpture fashioned from export quality butter. Featured are Wellington illustrator Simon Morse, visual artist Stuart Shepherd, performer Tanya Drewery (aka Magenta Diamond) and feminist photographer Siren Deluxe. Also making a cameo appearance — hold on to your rosary beads — the infamous 'Virgin In A Condom'. This Qantas Award-nominated episode was directed by the late Phill England.

Interview

Annie Goldson on Sheilas: 28 Years on

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Annie Goldson talks about the origins of award-winning documentary Sheilas: 28 Years On, which she co-directed with Dawn Hutchesson. Goldson talks about her commitment to feminism — a word her students often find problematic — and how Sheilas reintroduced audiences to five of the "interesting and powerful women" from gutsy 1977 series Women.

Interview

Susan Wilson - Funny As Interview

Alongside co-starring in classic office comedy Gliding On, Susan Wilson has acted in drama series Pioneer Women and a host of stage roles. This Funny As interview sees her touching on several subjects, including: Still being recognised for her Gliding On role as straight-talking office worker Beryl — which she played for five seasons Feeling lucky she got to play an early feminist role model on-screen — "Beryl usually solved the dilemma of the episode in some way, while all the men just couldn't cope" Lamenting the lack of diverse roles for women in the 1970s: "the girlfriend in the background, or the silly typist with the nail varnish on the desk" Working with playwright Roger Hall at Wellington's Circa Theatre: "He's always been able to capture whatever it is that's important that's going on around us" The  "amazing, genius comedy" of John Clarke, witnessed while acting with him onstage in Wellington

Numero Bruno

Television, 2000 (Full Length)

Numero Bruno is a warts and all biography of widely popular actor, musician and counter-cultural hero Bruno Lawrence. Lawrence's intense, charismatic screen presence was key to ground-breaking Kiwi films, Smash Palace, The Quiet Earth and Utu. Directed by Steve La Hood (the veteran director’s TV swansong), this documentary features interviews with family and friends, and liberal excerpts from Lawrence's film and musical work, including performances by 70s alternative Aotearoa icons Blerta and clips showcasing his seminal collaborations with Geoff Murphy.

Such a Stupid Way to Die

Short Film, 1971 (Full Length)

This educational video was made by the NFU for the National Mountain Safety Council to promote awareness of bush safety. After a blackboard science lesson (check out a bearded Ray Henwood) things get interesting. A fictional trip into the bush turns into a Stubbies-clad 70s Kiwi version of the Blair Witch Project as we're told that one of the group will not survive the night, picked off by that fearsome killer: exposure. The message is serious, but the doom-laden tone induced titters in school classrooms and scout halls throughout NZ.

A Double Standard

Television, 1994 (Full Length)

This documentary about the sex industry in New Zealand features frank but sympathetic interviews with sex workers (including the Prostitutes Collective) and their clients. Topics discussed include the sex workers' reasons for doing the job, physical and sexual safety, the impact of AIDS, the role of drink and drug abuse, and managing a relationship with a husband or boyfriend. The film screened on TV3 after arguments about censorship, which Costa Botes writes about here. A Double Standard makes a compelling case for the industry to be decriminalised. Law change occurred in 2003.