Heartland - Patea

Television, 1994 (Full Length Episode)

Occasional Heartland host Annie Whittle visits Patea in this full-length episode, and finds the town in rehearsal for the story of its own life. A decade in the making, Poi E - The Musical chronicles Patea's triumphs and tragedies, following the closure of the local freezing works in 1982. Whittle talks to Dalvanius Prime — the musician behind both the original number one song, and the Poi E musical — about the impact the closure had on the township. The programme ends with a rousing live version of 'Poi E'. Prime would pass away in October 2002.

Artist

PanAm

Indie rockers PanAm took off playing Nirvana and Black Sabbath covers in a West Auckland high school band, before unleashing their own thrash-garage neo-punk sound in the late 90s. The power trio were quickly snapped up by label Flying Nun label and released 2002 EP New Concepts in Sound Recording. It was followed a year later by a self-titled debut album, described as "kick ass rock 'n' roll that raised the ghost of Kurt Cobain". After changes in line-up PanAm relocated to Australia in 2004, but soon called it a day. 

Artist

Opshop

Formed in 2002 while singer/songwriter Jason Kerrison was playing acoustic gigs at an Auckland backpacker's bar, Opshop (original name: Goldfish Shopping Trolley) quickly found an audience after their debut single 'Saturated' won a competition for airplay on the ZM radio network. Their 2007 album Second Hand Planet yielded the singles 'Maybe' and the inescapable 'One Day', and made them the first local band to ever reach No.1 on iTunes New Zealand. Third album Until the End of Time reached number one in 2010. The following year Kerrison was made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to music.

Il Magiorre - My Father's War in Italy

Television, 2000 (Excerpts)

Political cartoonist Malcolm Evans tells his father's story of war in this documentary. Major Hilary Evans was exempt from conscription, but chose to fight in World War II. He was a prisoner of war who escaped and lived rough in Italy's hills and mountains, to avoid recapture. Using his father's letters and diaries as well as interviews shot in Italy, Evans builds up a picture of his father, the soldier. Il Magiorre - My Father's War in Italy played as part of the Documentary New Zealand strand on TV One, and was named Best Documentary at the 2002 Qantas Media Awards.

The Last Laugh

Television, 2002 (Full Length)

This Wayne Leonard documentary from 2002 goes on a journey to explore what defines Māori humour. The tu meke tiki tour travels from marae kitchens to TV screens, from original trickster Maui to cheeky kids, from the classic entertainers (including Prince Tui Teka tipping off an elephant) through to Billy T James, arguably the king of Māori comedy. Archive footage is complemented by interviews with well-known and everyday Kiwis, and contemporary comedians (Mike King, Pio Terei). Winston Peters and Tame Iti discuss humour as a political tool. 

Hokonui Todd

Television, 1991 (Full Length)

Hokonui Todd is a portrait of African statesman Sir Garfield Todd (1908 - 2002). Todd was an outspoken supporter of black right to self determination in Rhodesia (which became Zimbabwe in 1980, after a bloody civil war). Here Todd and wife Gracie reflect on their lives: from their "egalitarian" New Zealand upbringing; their arrival in Rhodesia as missionary farmers; Todd's time as Prime Minister; being imprisoned by Ian Smith's racist white regime (along with daughter Judith); to emerging as a "conscience of the country" burdened with postcolonial troubles.

The Truth about Tangiwai

Television, 2002 (Excerpts)

On Christmas Eve 1953 a volcanic eruption caused a massive lahar to flow down Whangaehu River. The Wellington-Auckland express crossed the rail bridge at Tangiwai minutes later; it collapsed, and carriages plunged into the flooded river. Out of 285 people, 151 died, in New Zealand's worst rail accident. This 2002 documentary examines events and the board of inquiry finding that the accident was an act of God. This excerpt attacks the story that Cyril Ellis could have warned the train driver what lay ahead, and argues there was a railways department cover-up at the board of inquiry. 

Series

Space

Television, 2000–2003

Late night music show Space launched on TV2 in 2000, with a pair of hosts introducing live performances, interviews, music videos and occasional silliness. The show marked the first ongoing screen gig for Jaquie Brown, who appeared with future X Factor New Zealand host Dominic Bowden. When Bowden left in 2002, he was replaced by Hugh Sundae. The final season was helmed by Jo Tuapawa and ex Space researcher Phil Bostwick. Space was made by production company Satellite Media, whose credits include many shows involving music (Ground Zero, Rocked the Nation). 

Queer Nation - Gay Games Reloaded

Television, 2003 (Full Length)

This Queer Nation episode focuses on the Gay Games, held in Sydney in 2002. With more than 12,000 participants (including 441 New Zealanders) the event was Australasia's largest queer event ever. It begins with an overview of the event, looking at the benefits it had for the community, business, and tourism. The second part is less upbeat, addressing the massive $2m loss the Games incurred, with discussion around the reasons for this. Part three is about the next Gay Games, to be held in Montreal in 2006, along with a brief historical overview of the event. 

Artist

Rhombus

Formed by producers Simon Rycroft, Imon Star and Thomas Voyce, Wellington act Rhombus billed itself as “Aotearoa's premier dub & bass electronic soul, funk, hip-hop band”. Their 2002 debut album Bass Player featured guest MCs and vocalists including  Tiki Taane and Raashi Malik, and tracks produced while Voyce was based in Japan. They also won fans with 'Clav Dub', a music video which paid homage to classic movie Goodbye Pork Pie. Two more Rhombus albums have followed, plus a collection of remixes.