Making Music - Warren Maxwell

Short Film, 2005 (Full Length)

TrinityRoots' vocalist and songwriter Warren Maxwell talks about his career and songwriting in this episode from a series for secondary school music students. Maxwell explains the genesis of the Wellington roots/reggae act's classic 'Little Things' (and the making of its music video); he performs a stripped back excerpt from the song. Maxwell also recalls the problems the band encountered in recording their first album and previews a new work, 'Angel Song' (which later appeared on TrinityRoots' second album Home, Land and Sea).  

The Gravy - Series Three, Episode One (Little Bushmen vs Auckland Philharmonia)

Television, 2008 (Full Length Episode)

This episode of the Sticky Pictures’ arts show covers a 13 July 2008 concert that combined the musical talents of the Little Bushman with composer John Psathas and the Auckland Philharmonia. Trinity Roots alumnus Warren Maxwell is the frontman for Little Bushman and is a behind-the-scenes guide as they prepare their trademark psychedelic blues for Psathas (Olympics 2004 opening ceremony score composer) to wrangle for orchestral collaboration. Philharmonia met harmonica in one-off gig at Auckland Town Hall. The doco was directed by Mark Albiston.

Artist

The Adults

A Kiwi supergroup, The Adults had their origins in songs written by Shihad frontman Jon Toogood that didn't suit that band. Instead, Toogood reached out to Shayne Carter (Straitjacket Fits, Dimmer) and Julia Deans (Fur Patrol) to help him record them for a solo project. The original songs were soon shelved in favour of all new collaborations and an album was recorded with a diverse pool of musicians including Anika Moa, Ladi6, Warren Maxwell (Little Bushman), Gary Sullivan (Dimmer, JPSE) and Tiki Taane (who co-produced the project with Toogood).

Artist

TrinityRoots

Eclectic trio TrinityRoots forged a reputation as an unmissable live act, with Warren Maxwell (Arts Laureate, frontman for Little Bushman) leading the surge towards rapture. The band mined reggae, soul, jazz and rock to create their own distinctive feel. The sound was first captured on an EP and two albums of indigenous downbeat classics: 2001's True and 2004's Home, Land and Sea, and in the epic farewell performance promo for 'Home, Land and Sea' from 2005. "From the tail of the fish..." Trinity Roots reformed in 2010 for further albums; original percussionist Riki Gooch departed the following year. 

The Gravy - Series Four, Episode One (Taranaki)

Television, 2009 (Full Length Episode)

Little Bushman muso Warren Maxwell goes west in this edition of The Gravy, to meet a trio of artists creating work in the shadow of Mt Taranaki. Waru Wharehoka, an autistic painter, makes abstract works, is obsessed with weapons and zombies, and takes Maxwell on a paddle beneath New Plymouth. Assemblage artist Dale Copeland scavenges plane wrecks on the mountain and dead friend's teeth for her art. And photographer Fiona Clark discusses why she used colour film to snap her controversial 1975 drag queen images, and using a photo to help save the Waitara River.

John Psathas

Composer

Born in NZ to Greek immigrants, John Psathas knew at 12 that music would be his life. Since then, he has composed for drum, sax, orchestra, and the Athens Olympic Games' opening. Psathas was profiled in award-winning doco View from Olympus. In arts show The Gravy he can be seen working with band Little Bushman. To date he has scored the soundtracks for two features: western Good for Nothing and period drama White Lies.

Marty Williams

Cinematographer

Subjects that have gone before cinematographer Marty Williams’ lens range from landscapes to South Auckland Shakespearians The Black Friars. Williams was a prolific shooter for arts shows The Gravy and The Living Room, and shared a Best Cinematography Qantas Award for maverick lawyer documentary Lost in Wonderland. Sometimes credited as Martyn Williams, the South Seas Film and TV School graduate also framed gang member OE short Day Trip, along with acclaimed work on adverts (often collaborating with director Mark Albiston) and music videos (Phoenix Foundation, Little Bushman).

Mark Albiston

Director

Mark Albiston has racked up awards at festivals in Cannes, Berlin and Salt Lake City, thanks to short films Run and The Six Dollar Fifty Man (which he co-directed with Louis Sutherland). After a UK OE, Albiston returned home to launch Sticky Pictures, where he began winning gongs for arts shows The Living Room and The Gravy. Alibston and Sutherland's 2013 feature Shopping won further awards and acclaim.

Julian Dickon

Writer

Julian Dickon’s place in New Zealand screen history would be secure thanks to just one show groundbreaking 70s drama series Pukemanu, which he created. Dickon also wrote a number of early plays for television, and went on to write drama, documentary and children’s show Sea Urchins. Dickon passed away on 3 April 2015.

Olly Ohlson

Presenter [Ngāti Whare]

Olly Ohlson is a pioneer of Māori language and Māori content on local television. As longtime presenter on daily children's show After School, his catchphrase “Keep cool till after school” (with accompanying sign language) was known to a generation of New Zealanders.