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Michael Hurst

Actor, Director

Actor and director Michael Hurst is a Kiwi creative institution. Even leaving aside his work as a director and stage actor, Hurst's screen resume runs to 50 roles and counting: including playing everyone from painter Toulouse-Lautrec, to Hercules's sidekick Iolaus, to politician Rodney Hide. 

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Spotlight

Kiwi Comedy Horror

Curated by the NZ On Screen team . 9 Items

NZ filmmakers have long shown a knack for melding different flavours on film, and as this Spotlight collection demonstrates, that extends to mixing comedy with horror. Watch Michael Hurst battle mutants (Death Warmed Up), Anna Hutchison find zombie love (Rotting Hill), spiders getting comically o...

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Spotlight

Shane Cortese - Top Five

Curated by the NZ On Screen team . 5 Items

Actor, dancer and singer Shane Cortese picks his favourite titles on NZ On Screen for this Top Five Spotlight collection. Cortese’s choice choices are Outrageous Fortune (“… a show I’m immensely proud to have been a part of”), The World’s Fastest Indian, Home by Christmas (“… great New Zealand st...

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Interview

Michael Hurst: Heroes, Hercules, and much more...

Interview - Clare O'Leary. Camera and Editing - Leo Guerchmann

Michael Hurst is an acclaimed theatre actor and director, who has also featured in a broad range of television and film roles, including his long-running gig as sidekick Iolaus in the American TV series Hercules. In the mid-90s Hurst also began directing for the screen, initially on episodes of Hercules and Xena, but also helming the feature film comedy Jubilee, and TV mockumentary drama Love Mussel.

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Collection

The Top 10 NZ Television Ads

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Great adverts are strange things: mini works of magic, with the power to make viewers smile, cry, and even buy. Kiwi directors have shown such a knack for making them, they've been invited to do so across the globe. But this collection is about local favourites; dogs on skateboards, choc bar robberies, ghost chips. NZ On Screen's Irene Gardiner backgrounds the top 10 here.

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Collection

A Tribute to Kevin Smith

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Actor Kevin Smith could do it all; from brooding like Brando in a Tennessee Williams play, through Xena, to the gentle romantic lead of Double Booking, and self-parody in Love Mussel. Collected here are selections from a career cut short (he died in a 2002 film-set accident). Plus tributes from James Griffin, Michael Hurst, Geoffrey Dolan and Simon Prast. 

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Death Warmed Up

Film, 1984 (Trailer, Excerpts, and Extras)

Pre-dating Peter Jackson's arrival (Bad Taste) by three years, New Zealand's first horror movie sees Michael Hurst making his movie debut as he fights mutants (including Bruno Lawrence) on Waiheke Island. Hurst's character is out to avenge the mad scientist who forced him to kill his parents. A grand prize-winner at a French fantasy festival (with cult director Alejandro Jodorowsky on the jury), David Blyth's splatterfest marked the first of many horrors funded by the NZ Film Commission. It was also the first local showcase of the smoothly-flowing Steadicam camera.

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Series

Westside

Television, 2015–ongoing

Classic TV3 series Outrageous Fortune won a devoted following over six seasons. Prequel show Westside takes the West family back to where it all began — to legendary safe cracker Ted West (David de Lautour) and his fiery wife Rita (Outrageous actor Antonia Prebble). Each episode of series one was set in a particular year of the 1970s. Season two was set during the 1981 Springbok Tour; a third, set in 1982, followed in 2017. Combining romance, crime and West family folklore with real events, Westside was created by James Griffin and Rachel Lang, the writing team behind the original.

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Don't Fight it Marsha, It's Bigger Than Both of Us

Blam Blam Blam, Music Video, 1981

Blam Blam Blam’s second hit from 1981 was angular and artsy, hook-filled but unsettling: all qualities captured in a theatrical video, directed by Andrew Shaw. Clowns, magicians, fire-eaters and trick cyclists join the band, while actors play out the saga of ‘Don’t Fight It, Marsha’. The actors — including Phillip Gordon (Came a Hot Friday), Michael Hurst and Donogh Rees (Constance) — were directed by Harry Sinclair, who would later join Blam band member Don McGlashan in The Front Lawn. The Len Lye-style scratch effects were by Jenny Pullar, the Blams’ lighting designer.

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Red Blooded - Lion Red

Commercial, 1993 (Full Length)

This boisterous Geoff Dixon-directed commercial dates from the time when craft beer was yet to make a big mark, and Lion Red was NZ's number one beer. Hyperactive in a flannel shirt, a pre-Hercules Michael Hurst takes the mic at a pub talent quest, and sings a war cry for Kiwi blokes against wimpy pretenders like champagne cocktails and Mexican beers. Local advertising veteran Roy Meares wrote the "anti-yuppie commercial" (he was also behind the long-running Speights 'Perfect Woman' campaign). The Murray Grindlay-composed song became a pub anthem.