Syn City - New Zealand's Deadly Synthetic Drugs Epidemic

Web, 2018 (Full Length Episode)

In 2013 the Psychoactive Substances Act became law in Aotearoa, effectively outlawing synthetic cannabinoids. This Vice documentary looks at how they continue to affect West Auckland — where people are still addicted, but the drugs are now on the black market. Tammara shares her experiences of trying to get clean, and dealing with treatment services. Her father rues the impact of synthetics on her life, and emergency responders add their views. Meanwhile ex user Trey talks about those he’s lost. In 2017 deaths linked to synthetic drug use showed a major spike in New Zealand.

Orange Roughies - First Episode

Television, 2006 (Excerpts)

Orange Roughies was a 'border security' drama series following a Police and Customs task force in Auckland.  Storylines included drugs busts, undercover ops and plenty of motorised chase action. In this excerpt from the first episode, customs officer Jane Durant (McLeod's Daughters actor Zoe Naylor) boards a ship suspected of trafficking children from China. The TV One series was devised by ex policeman Scott McJorrow and Rod Johns, for production company ScreenWorks. 

Away Laughing - First Episode

Television, 1991 (Full Length Episode)

The first episode of this sketch comedy show debuted in May 1991. Most of the skits were tested and filmed in front of a live audience. The large cast includes early appearances by a roll call of emerging talents: Kevin Smith displays his talent for accents, while frustrating a McDonalds lawyer and talking his way through customs; Vicki Walker's character Felicity crushes on Steve Parr; Danny Mulheron's self-satisfied priest Phineas O'Diddle embarrasses Hori Ahipene; and Facial DBX comedians Jon Bridges and David Downs play day-glo clad skateboarders talking digital watches.

A Thousand Apologies - First Episode

Television, 2008 (Full Length Episode)

A Thousand Apologies is a fast-paced series of comic sketches by and about Asian New Zealanders. In this first episode, common cliches and racial tropes ( bad Asian driver, nerdy Chinese student) are sharply mocked. The writers sprinkle in some quick sight gags between longer sketches. Tarun Mohanbhai and Rajeev Varma team up as posessive Hindu parents trying to orchestrate the perfect arranged marriage; and Scribe's 2003 hip hop hit 'Not Many' is transformed into a celebration of Asian 'nerd styles', including shout-outs to "North Takapuna" and "West Henderson".

Series

Tough Act

Television, 2005

In 2005 director Stuart McKenzie brought a camera crew into the studios and rehearsal spaces of Toi Whakaari, New Zealand's top drama school, to follow the progress of its first-year acting students. The class included future names like Dan Musgrove and Sophie Hambleton (Westside) and Matt Whelan (Go Girls). Tough Act was nominated for Best Reality Show at the 2007 Qantas Television Awards and the 2007 NZ Screen Awards. The concept was custom-made for reality TV: tough auditions to find 22 diverse young people, who chased the same dream and faced a multitude of challenges. 

No Mean Feat

Television, 2002 (Full Length)

In 1982 bad weather left Mark Inglis and Phil Doole trapped for 13 days in a crevasse, close to the summit of Aoraki/Mt Cook. No Mean Feat chronicles the path taken by Inglis since — from rescue, and the discovery he would lose his lower limbs, to his reinvention as research scientist, winemaker, and paralympic cyclist. In 2001 cameras followed Inglis back to Cook, where he attempted another climb using custom-designed prosthetic legs. Topped off by stunning aerial footage of Mt Cook, No Mean Feat won best documentary at the 2003 NZ TV Awards.

Over the Sea and Near Away

Short Film, 1966 (Full Length)

Sponsored by the Crusader Shipping Company, this 1966 National Film Unit production joins one of the firm's ships as it transports NZ products from Auckland to Asia — home to “one quarter of the human race, 900 million customers”. As milk powder, wool, mutton, apples, cheese and deer antlers are delivered to ports in the Philippines, China, Japan, and Hong Kong, director Ron Bowie observes cultural difference and economic opportunity; and a “westernising” Orient is beautifully captured by Kell Fowler. The NFU crew were rare foreign observers in Chairman Mao’s China.  

Spring Flames

Short Film, 2003 (Full Length)

The Ballantyne's Department Store fire in November 1947 claimed 41 lives and left a lasting scar on Christchurch — the city’s biggest single disaster until the 2011 earthquake. The events of that spring day are explored in this short film which intersperses archive footage with a fictional account of workers and customers in the tailoring department as the dramas of everyday life are suddenly overwhelmed. It was directed by Aileen O’Sullivan, shot by Alun Bollinger and made with the NZ Drama School graduating class of 2002 (with music by Gareth Farr).

Series

It's in the Bag

Television, 1973–1992

Roving quiz show It’s in the Bag got its first screen incarnation in 1973, after Selwyn Toogood campaigned to bring his popular radio series to television. Competitors answered three questions before picking a bag, hoping it contained treasure. Several of Toogood's catchphrases won enduring fame, including "by hokey!” and ”what’ll it be customers, the money or the bag?”. His co-hosts included Heather Eggleton and Tineke Bouchier. After Toogood retired in 1986, John Hawkesby took over, then Nick Tansley. Māori Television relaunched the show in 2009 (also viewable on NZ On Screen).

Intrepid Journeys - Russia (Marcus Lush)

Television, 2007 (Excerpts)

Trainspotter Marcus Lush trades the Raurimu Spiral for Russia's Trans-Siberian Railway where he is served peas in oil. He takes in a vast country wrestling off shackles of communism, where beer drinking on buses on the way to work equates with capitalist freedom. He visits Moscow, St Petersburg and Vladivostok, and inbetween discovers that much of Russia still follows traditional customs: emphasising respect, sharing food, drink and ciggies; and he concludes: "I'd rather be a peasant in Russia than live in a trailer park in Detroit."