Face Value - A Real Dog

Television, 1995 (Full Length Episode)

Written by Fiona Samuel (Marching Girls, Bliss, Home Movie) and produced by Ginette McDonald for television’s Montana Sunday Theatre, Face Value is a trilogy of monologues delivered by three separate women. While each woman’s story and background are vastly different, they are all united by their shared quest to find happiness amidst personal trauma. In A Real Dog, Carol Smith’s performance is spot-on as Lynette, a conflicted new-age hippie who struggles to recreate harmony when a new flatmate (and her estranged boyfriend) moves in.

Dean Spanley

Film, 2008 (Trailer and Excerpts)

This offbeat father and son feature was written by Scotsman Alan Sharp, and mostly filmed in the UK by a Fijian-Brit Kiwi. Lawrence of Arabia legend Peter O'Toole plays a stiff upper lip Englishman whose frosty relationship with his son warms after hearing an extraordinary tale of reincarnation from Reverend Dean Spanley (Sam Neill). Based on an Edward Plunkett novella, Toa Fraser's second feature won praise for its cast, and mix of comedy and poignancy, "intertwined to the last" (The Age). Spanley won a host of Qantas awards; GQ rated it their film of the year.

Series

It's in the Bag

Television, 1973–1992

Roving quiz show It’s in the Bag got its first screen incarnation in 1973, after Selwyn Toogood campaigned to bring his popular radio series to television. Competitors answered three questions before picking a bag, hoping it contained treasure. Several of Toogood's catchphrases won enduring fame, including "by hokey!” and ”what’ll it be customers, the money or the bag?”. His co-hosts included Heather Eggleton and Tineke Bouchier. After Toogood retired in 1986, John Hawkesby took over, then Nick Tansley. Māori Television relaunched the show in 2009 (also viewable on NZ On Screen).

Home, Land and Sea

TrinityRoots, Music Video, 2005

Director Chris Graham planned an ambitious video for this song, but budget and scheduling got in the way. When Graham heard TrinityRoots were disbanding, he pitched the idea of a live video at their farewell concert in the Wellington Town Hall. Mixing in footage of land and sea, the result honours one of their anthems and captures a glimpse of the original line-up in their soulful, impassioned element. TrinityRoots regrouped in 2010, but this video preserves the final moments of their first incarnation; when their one waka was turning into three.

Getting Older

The Clean, Music Video, 1982

Early standard bearers for the Flying Nun label, The Clean ended their first incarnation with this abrasive, rollicking, darkly-humoured take on the aging process (featuring backing vocals from Chris Knox and some Robert Scott trumpet). Ronnie van Hout, who designed much of the label's early artwork, turned his hand at directing for this clip. Without a budget, he utilised the Christchurch service lanes and aging inner city buildings which housed so many of the local music industry's bars, clubs and rehearsal rooms (and a succession of early Flying Nun offices).

Grunt Machine - Ragnarok

Television, 1976 (Excerpts)

The only surviving footage of spacey progressive rockers Ragnarok is this studio performance from a mid-70s rock show. This is the band's second incarnation (following the departure of original vocalist Lea Maalfrid) and they perform four tracks from their second album Nooks: 'Five Years', 'Waterfall/Captain Fagg', 'The Volsung' and the disc's title track. As befits the musicians' intent, band and cameras are largely content to let the music do the talking — the visual departure of the glam rock boogie of 'Captain Fagg' comes as quite a surprise.

Artist

Timberjack

Timberjack was the second incarnation of Dizzy Limits, a covers group formed in 1964. Building a repertoire of Beatles and Stones hits, they appeared on TV's C'mon and Happen Inn before heading to the UK in 1970 as house band on the Northern Star cruise liner. They returned home in 1971 with a new name and sound inspired by a proto-heavy metal style. Their cover of 'Come to the Sabbat', and the panic caused by its occult-themed promo, proved to be a career-high and swansong: Timberjack split soon after.

Sale of the Century - 1993 Final

Television, 1993 (Full Length Episode)

In this June 1993 final of the successful quiz show, returning contestant Tony competes for a hand-knitted rug, a $16,000 US trip, and a box possibly containing a $29,000 Mitsubishi Mirage. Facing off against him are a policy services officer, and a hotshot language tutor who lived seven years in a barn. Aside from the nailbiting question rounds, highlights include Steve Parr’s opening slide, Jude Dobson’s dress, and male models in bright yellow overalls. This episode marked the end of Sale’s first local incarnation, after 1000 plus episodes on air. A short rebirth followed on TV3.

6.30PM News - Grahame Thorne's Perm

Television, 1983 (Excerpts)

With stints as an All Black, Springbok triallist, sports presenter, National MP, and sometime celebrity chef, Grahame Thorne has experienced his share of fame. But perhaps his hottest 15 minutes came after he dared to present the sports news one day in 1983 ... with a perm. The ensuing national trauma inspired headlines, irate phonecalls, and “curls are for girls” banners at rugby games. Sadly the perm’s freshest incarnation is lost to the archives, and this slightly grown-out version is the only extant evidence of a key moment in Kiwi fashion history.

Extraordinary Kiwis - Colin Meads

Television, 2007 (Full Length Episode)

Jim Greenhough profiles Colin 'Pinetree' Meads — NZ rugby’s Player of the Century — who represented his country in 133 matches from 1957 to 1971. He spends a day with the 71-year-old All Black legend on the King Country farm he has worked all his adult life. Meads drenches sheep and muses on rugby as it was, its modern incarnation, and the way new farming methods have changed the provincial game which was once the sport’s backbone. Photographer Peter Bush recalls his years of following and shooting Meads who, he says, has aged like a fine wine.