Collection

The Top 10 NZ Television Ads

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Great adverts are strange things: mini works of magic, with the power to make viewers smile, cry, and even buy. Kiwi directors have shown such a knack for making them, they've been invited to do so across the globe. But this collection is about local favourites; dogs on skateboards, choc bar robberies, ghost chips. NZ On Screen's Irene Gardiner backgrounds the top 10 here.

I Am TV - Series Five, Final Episode

Television, 2012 (Full Length Episode)

The final episode of this long-running TVNZ show for Māori youth comes from a BBQ party atop Auckland's TVNZ HQ. When I AM TV began in 2008 it was all about Bebo. Five years later it’s about Bieber (the singer #tautokos the show), Skux and Twitter, and the hashtag #KeepingItReo. Hosts Kimo Houltham and Chey Milne review the year’s highlights: from Koroneihana to a boil up with Katchafire; from dance crews to hunting for Jeff da Māori, with Liam Messam and The Waikato Chiefs; from a Samoan holiday (with co-presenter Taupunakohe Tocker), to defining mana in 2012.

Passport to Pleasure

Short Film, 1958 (Full Length)

One of the last films shot by longtime cameraman Bert Bridgman before his death, this 1958 promotional film follows an American tourist with a licence to fish in New Zealand, her “passport to pleasure”. Narrated by Pulitzer-Prize winning writer and conservationist Louis Bromfield, the film quotes liberally from English 'father of fishing' Izaak Walton, as the “gal from the States” is given fly fishing instruction. The life cycle of trout is shown, and the film — directed by onetime war correspondent Ron McIntyre — ends with a contest of wits between wily angler and trout. 

New Zealand Mirror No. 12

Short Film, 1951 (Full Length)

This episode of 'magazine-film' series New Zealand Mirror educates its British audience about trampers, trout and trolling for big-game fish in Aotearoa. The first clip sees members of the Tararua Tramping Club hiking through mud, snow and water in the Tararua Ranges, laden with building supplies to construct a new hut. Heading up the island, the second clip captures Rotorua trout hatchery workers taking eggs from trout, and later releasing the tiny fish into waterways. The Bay of Islands stars in the final story, where a Yale University team studies big-game fish.

Legend (Ghost Chips) - Road Safety

Commercial, 2011 (Full Length)

This 2011 anti-drink driving ad campaign became a Kiwi pop cultural phenomenon, spawning countless parodies, memes, t-shirts and over a million YouTube views; phrases from the ad entered the vernacular (“you know I can’t grab your ghost chips”). Eschewing the usual shock and horror tactics, the Clemenger BBDO campaign for the NZ Transport Agency was targeted at young male Māori drivers, and used humour to get the message across that it was choice to stop a mate from driving drunk. Directed by Steve Ayson, it won a prestigious D&AD Yellow Pencil award in 2012.

What We Do in the Shadows

Film, 2014 (Trailer)

Actor/director Taika Waititi teamed up with his Eagle vs Shark star Jemaine Clement for this mockumentary about life for a flat of vampires. Cameras follow the vamps as they struggle to get into Wellington pubs, squabble over chores and face off against werewolves. A roster of Kiwi comedic talent (including Jackie van Beek and lazy vampire Jonathan Brugh) feature. After winning fangtastic reviews at America's Sundance and SXSW festivals, Shadows won a run of global sales and four Moa awards, including Best Self-Funded Feature. It also spawned two TV series, and a live show.

Into the Void

Film, 2014 (Trailer)

This documentary delves into Christchurch underground band Into the Void. The Black Sabbath-inspired group was formed in the late 80s by art school students Jason Greig, Paul Sutherland, Ronnie van Hout and Mark Whyte. Two decades spawned only two albums; the reputation of “Christchurch’s answer to Spinal Tap” rests on legendary live shows, with noise complaint-worthy riffs splitting ears at former bar Dux de Lux. Director Margaret Gordon assembled archive and interviews with band members and mates to capture the milieu of metal, booze, quakes and art. 

Artist

Graham Brazier

Graham Brazier’s swagger and musical talent are part of Kiwi music history. Brazier's career began with university band Oktober; in 1975 he joined Dave McArtney and Harry Lyon to form Hello Sailor. Their self-titled debut album spawned classics 'Gutter Black' and Brazier's 'Blue Lady'. Inbetween Hello Sailor and his band The Legionnaires, Brazier recorded solo albums Inside Out (1981) — which included classic track 'Billy Bold' — Brazier (1987) and East of Eden (2004). A fourth album was almost complete when he died on 4 September 2015, a month after suffering a heart attack.

Artist

Avalanche City

When Avalanche City recorded its first album, it was literally as a one-man band. That one man was Dave Baxter; in a small country hall north of Auckland, he assembled Our New Life Above the Ground. Initially released as a free download, the album took off thanks to 2011 single Love Love Love, which topped the New Zealand charts after TV2 picked it up as the soundtrack to its station promos. The album was then rereleased by Warner Music. Second album We Are For the Wild Places followed in 2015, and spawned a second chart-topper, 'Inside Out'. To boost the live sound, a full band of musicians is added.

Artist

Goldenhorse

Auckland band Goldenhorse were formed in 1999 by English born vocalist Kirsten Morrell and guitarist Geoff Maddock (formerly of Bressa Creeting Cake). They attracted patronage from Tim and Neil Finn who loaned them gear to record debut album, Riverhead. It eventually topped the charts and sold over 50,000 copies, spawning hit 'Maybe Tomorrow' (the most played local song on NZ radio in 2003). Led by Morrell's ethereal vocals, two further albums of melodic folk-pop followed.