5736.thumb

Prince Tui Teka - 1983 Variety Show

Television, 1983 (Full Length Episode)

Kicking off with a cover of his hero Elvis Presley's 'That's Alright,' the late Prince Tui Teka delivers a classic performance in this TVNZ-filmed variety show (one of three specials). A classy Bernie Allen-led band and the Yandall Sisters back-up on the smoky Vegas-inspired set. Tui sings his hit 'E Ipo' with wife Missy, and they pay tribute to the song’s Māori lyricist Ngoi (‘Poi-E’) Pewhairangi. The songs are peppered with warmth, humour and poi action (led by a young Pita Sharples), as Tui Teka confirms his reputation as one of Aotearoa's great entertainers.

John tui thumbnail.key.jpg.180x180

John Tui

Actor

Actor John Tui grew up in Manurewa, the oldest of eight siblings. After training at Unitec, he got a break on Power Rangers and has since scored regular NZ TV work including recurring roles on Go Girls and Shortland Street. On the big screen he plays father to the main character in 2015's Born to Dance, and was US Navy officer Walter ‘The Beast’ Lynch alongside Rihanna, in Hollywood film Battleship.

Prince tui teka key profile.jpg.180x180

Prince Tui Teka

Musician

Larger than life and the ultimate showband performer, Prince Tui Teka's resume included years on the international circuit with the Maori Troubadours and the Maori Volcanics. A successful solo career and love songs like ‘E Ipo’, alongside roles in films like Savage Islands and Came a Hot Friday have ensured his name is listed in New Zealand entertainment history.

Prince tui teka key profile
Artist

Prince Tui Teka

Prince Tui Teka was born in Ruatahuna in 1937. He joined a circus in the early 1950s and moved to Australia. A multi-instrumentalist with a big personality and an infectious sense of humour, he established himself as a cabaret musician with The Maori Troubadours and then The Maori Volcanics. A solo career followed in the early 70s. He moved back to Tokomaru Bay in 1981 and co-wrote his greatest hit ‘E Ipo’ with Ngoi (‘Poi E’) Pewhairangi when he was courting her niece (and his future wife) Missy. It was NZ’s first te reo chart topper. He died in 1985. 

5 decades no 1 hits may 17 v2.jpg.540x405
Collection

Five Decades of NZ Number One Hits

Curated by NZ On Screen team

This collection rounds up almost every music video for a number one hit by a Kiwi artist; everything from ballads to hip hop to glam rock. Press on the images below to find the hits for each decade  — plus try this backgrounder by Michael Higgins, whose high speed history of local hits touches on the sometimes questionable ways past charts were created.  

Nuclear free nz.jpg.540x405
Collection

Nuclear-free New Zealand

Curated by NZ On Screen team

On 8 June 1987 Nuclear-free New Zealand became law. This collection honours the principles and people behind the policy. Prime Minister Norman Kirk put it like this: "I don't think New Zealand's a doormat. I think we've got rights — we're a small country but we've got equal rights, and we're going to assert them." In the backgrounder, journalist Tim Watkin explores the twists and turns of Aotearoa's nuclear history.   

Love songs.jpg.540x405
Collection

Kiwi Love Songs

Curated by NZ On Screen team

NZ On Screen has selected this collection of 30 Kiwi love songs, which spans 50 years of music. The list ranges widely — from an early Loxene Golden Disc winner for Ray Columbus and the Invaders, to Dragon in the 70s, and in the 80s, everyone from Blam Blam Blam to Prince Tui Teka. Entries from later decades include Tiki Taane and Unknown Mortal Orchestra. That's not even the half of it: along the way, check out a trio of classics whose take on romance is positively oceanic: 'Anchor Me', 'Sway' and 'Not Given Lightly'. 

E ipo key image

E Ipo

Prince Tui Teka, Music Video, 1983

Music legend Prince Tui Teka performs his greatest hit ‘E Ipo’ in this excerpt from a TVNZ special recorded at Auckland’s Mandalay Ballroom. Based on a traditional Indonesian folk melody, ‘E Ipo’ was written by Teka with Ngoi (‘Poi E’) Pewhairangi, when he was courting her niece (and his future wife) Missy. The two join Tui Teka on stage (along with Pita Sharples’ Te Roopu Manutaki cultural group) for a rousing rendition performed with his trademark verve and humour. The song reached number one, following te reo-dominated chart-toppers 'The Bridge' (sung by Deane Waretini) in 1981, and Howard Morrison's 1982 version of 'How Great Thou Art'.

Birdland   first episode thumb

Birdland - First Episode

Television, 2009 (Full Length Episode)

Nearly mammal free, pre-human New Zealand was a land of birds, many of them found nowhere else. In Birdland, Jeremy Wells (Eating Media Lunch) explores all things avian in Aotearoa. In this opening episode he visits Hauraki Gulf island sanctuary Tiritiri Matangi and Christchurch’s Peacock Springs. Putting the wry into wrybill, Wells muses on manu matters from twitching to tākahe poop. Dominion Post’s Linda Burgess praised Mike Single's "marvellous camera work", and Wells’ celebration of ordinary people "who work to protect and enhance what we still have".

Wild south   sanctuary thumb

Wild South - Sanctuary

Television, 1990 (Full Length)

This Wild South edition joins two legendary New Zealand wildlife documentarians — photographer Geoff Moon and sound recordist John Kendrick — on a 1988 trip to Kāpiti Island. Rangers are learning about, and looking after, the sanctuary’s manu (birds), who are “biological refugees” from the mainland, escaping introduced predators. Dogs monitoring kiwi, a kākā census, and tīeke (saddleback) nest boxes are featured. The two old mates narrate the visit, which includes Moon building a bush hide, and footage of a pioneering 1964 tīeke relocation from Hen Island.