Bloopers

When television fails to go to plan, polished professionalism can collapse into laughter, awkward pauses and the occasional bruise. Audiences can find both laughter, and even a measure of comfort, as they witness things falling apart. We're reminded that no one is perfect, even the beautiful people. NZ On Screen's Bloopers Collection includes presenters and actors reacting to booboos by giggling, dancing, and more. There are famous falls, lost eyeballs and many cameos — from Hilary Barry to the cast of Shortland Street, to a menagerie of animals and children's TV hosts.

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Bloopers - Shortland Street

Television, 2018 (Excerpts)

When a show has been in production for over 25 years, the odd mistake is to be expected — as this assemblage of Shortland Street bloopers demonstrates. - Angela Dotchin invents a new word - Angela Bloomfield gets confused over who she's talking to - Peter Elliott almost gets hit by part of the set - Peter Elliott manages to stay in character after Tandi Wright hits a pot plant - John Leigh performs miracles on a sick dog - Peter Elliott has some bother with Elizabeth McRae's cheque - Michael Galvin hurts his leg - Roy Snow gets his cords confused - Theresa Healey has a bumpy kiss - Paul Ellis's face is grabbed by a baby  - Ido Drent announces he's pregnant - Craig Parker hits a pot plant - Mr Whippy distracts Nisha Madhan  - Angela Bloomfield fluffs her line - Angela Bloomfield battles dialogue and weapons - Lee Donoghue forgets a line - and more!

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The Son of a Gunn Show - Thingee's Eye Pop

Television, 1994 (Full Length)

The moment Thingee's eye popped out has become a legendary event in Kiwi television history, as an unflappable Jason Gunn continues hosting duties, despite his co-presenter being in a spot of bother. The ocular incident occurred during filming of The Son of a Gunn Show. Although some swear they saw it happen live, the moment did not go to air until weeks after the event — on a nighttime bloopers show. Thingee debuted on After School and appeared in several children's shows, including What Now?. He retired from New Zealand television after returning to his home planet. 

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Bloopers - News

Television, 2018 (Excerpts)

These clips offer up a selection of Kiwi news bloopers. First, Sacha McNeil presents a retrospective of unscripted moments from TV3’s first 25 years of news: newsreaders sneeze and laugh, and reporters face rogue weather, animals, dance routines, and lashings of champagne from Olympic champions. Then presenter Hilary Barry laughs at inappropriate moments on The Paul Henry Show: she starts an extended battle with the giggles while mentioning All Black Waisake Naholo’s broken leg (2015). In 2016 she succumbs to laughter over an emergency defecation situation.

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Bloopers - Animals

Television, 2018 (Excerpts)

Animals, people and cameras can make for a wild unpredictable combination, as this set of bloopers demonstrates. First up is the legendary 1989 clip of rugby star Zinzan Brooke falling off a spooked Shetland pony in Wales. Back on Kiwi soil, Dexter the golden labrador refuses to listen to owner Mark Leishman. A hare and dog take over a trotting track and cricket pitch, while reporters doing their pieces to camera are harassed by a friendly horse and overzealous ostriches. Plus two pigs give Country Calendar reporter John Gordon the giggles.  

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Dancing with the Stars - Rodney Hide excerpt (Series Two, Episode Six)

Television, 2006 (Excerpts)

Midway through the second season of the hit ballroom dancing show, politician Rodney Hide had won fans, lost weight, and weathered accusations that vote rigging had gone his way. More drama was to come: in this excerpt, Hide fails to catch dance partner Krystal Stuart at the end of their cha-cha, leading to the lowest score possible, and subsequent elimination. In 2018 Stuff rated the mishap as one of Dancing with the Stars' five most memorable moments. Hide regained some dignity in a series final guest appearance, when he and Stuart returned to execute the routine.

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25 Years of Television - Funny Moments

Television, 1985 (Excerpts)

No television special would be complete without a bloopers reel. 1985 marked the 25th anniversary of television in New Zealand, and one of the events celebrating it was a variety show at the Michael Fowler Centre. In this short excerpt, host Roger Gascoigne introduces a montage of humorous TV moments from across the years, some planned and others probably not — from turkeys in gumboots, Bill McCarthy’s exploding piano, and Relda Familton being judo-flipped, to Tom Bradley losing his script, and presenter Peter Sinclair disappearing in dry ice at the 1983 Feltex Awards.

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Dancing with the Stars - Backstage (Series One)

Television, 2005 (Excerpts)

Dancing with the Stars was a ratings hit for TV One. The opening season was named Best Entertainment/ Reality Programme at the 2005 Qantas Awards, and viewers switched on in droves to watch Kiwi celebrities tackling the challenge of ballroom dancing — and sometimes failing. In this brief collection of season one bloopers, host Candy Lane intentionally bumbles over her lines after examining Bernice Mene's outfit, Tim Shadbolt falls over (three times), and actor Shane Cortese gets a kick where it hurts the most. The montage is set to Supergrass song ‘Alright’. 

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Bloopers - Presenters and Props

Television, 2018 (Excerpts)

Cameras can be unforgiving — especially when they capture presenters fluffing their lines. In this selection of bloopers from across the decades, we see Hudson and Halls having a minor spat while trying to introduce their show, and some out of control props. Bugs Bunny Show host Fiona Anderson twice knocks over a telescope, while It's in the Bag presenter Nick Tansley looks on as Suzy Clarkson (née Aiken) bends over too far. Mike Rehu reveals the wrong day of the week on Play School, Mai Time's Mike Haru pulls a face, and a car is hit by falling glitter and something heavier.

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Totes Māori - Bloopers (Series One)

Television, 2013 (Excerpts)

This is the bloopers reel from the 2013 TV2 series for young people. Presenters Alex Tarrant and Niwa Whatuira feature prominently. Whatuira states the obvious when meeting some Diwali drummers, singers Anika Moa and Ria Hall need some practice as a presenting duo, Tarrant drops the mic (but not in a good way), actor Shavaughn Ruakere has trouble with Shortland Street’s sliding doors, Stan Walker provides a dodgy intro to his music video, Fat Freddy members Dallas and Ian fluff their lines, and Whatuira chats up an interviewee. Plus there are festival and playground photo bombs.

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Studio 2 Live - Bloopers (Series Seven)

Television, 2010 (Excerpts)

Studio 2 Live (also known as Studio 2) was a long-running TV2 kids show that screened in the after school slot. The programming included prizes, interviews, and travels around New Zealand. This excerpt is a 2010 bloopers reel from one of those trips: a 'Mission-On 2 Town' visit to the town of Franz Josef. Presenters Jordan Vandermade and Dayna Vawdrey see a sign at the local school and sing about it, Jordan stumbles on the ice, and over his lines in the dark; a giant kiwi abseils, uses the dunny, and loses his head. And almost everybody does some dancing.

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The Erin Simpson Show - Bloopers (Series Five)

Television, 2013 (Excerpts)

The Erin Simpson Show was a staple of TVNZ’s after school programming over five years from 2009, with host Erin Simpson a familiar face to a generation of Kiwi kids. The magazine-style show covered everything from sport and gaming, to fashion and celebrities. This compilation of bloopers from the final season sees presenters fumble lines and get the giggles: Michael Lee follows a recipe instruction too literally, and hits himself with a conker; Erin falls over some words and mentions being "great-a-full"; and comedy duo Chris & Guy clown around, and ham it up as fashionistas.

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The 4.30 Show - Bloopers

Television, 2015 (Excerpts)

This after school show on TV2 delivered celebrities, music, sport, fashion and interviews for the YouTube generation. In the show's closing stages it was presented by Eve Palmer (The Erin Simpson Show) and Adam Percival (What Now?). In this 2015 bloopers reel Adam and Eve fluff their lines, get the giggles and show off impromptu dance moves. Eve goes cross-eyed, while Adam gets a swear word beeped out and attempts to play ‘April Sun in Cuba’ on a recorder. The 4.30 Show morphed into The Adam and Eve Show in 2016, before heading to ZM radio the following year.  

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1974 Commonwealth Games - Graham May Face-plant

Television, 1974 (Excerpts)

This classic sports mishap from the 1974 Commonwealth Games sees weightlifter Graham May fall flat on his face after passing out while holding a 187.5kg barbell over his head. Despite the fall May went on to win gold in the super heavyweight (110kg+) division, and weightlifting gained a local profile due to his and the NZ team's success. The mustachioed Kiwi’s face-plant became a staple of blooper reels worldwide: from the long-running 'It's moments like these …' Minties ad campaign to the title sequence for ABC’s Wide World of Sports on US TV. May died in 2006.

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Backch@t - Bloopers and Highlights (Series Three)

Television, 2000 (Excerpts)

“Here is a taste of the best and worst of Backch@t 2000…goodnight.” Presenter Bill Ralston introduces this reel of outtakes and highlights from the Gibson Group arts series. The creative sector's issues of the day include installing Len Lye’s Wind Wand, arts funding, and arts patron Denis Adam’s thoughts on Te Papa’s arts displays. Ralston, reporters Mark Crysell and Jodi Ihaka, and film reviewer Chris Knox all get tongue-tied; there’s a tiff between two architecture panelists, brief appearances by Ian McKellen and Miriama Kamo, and opera singer Jonathan Lemalu hits a low note.

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Fresh - Bloopers and Fob Outs (Series Two)

Television, 2012 (Excerpts)

This bloopers reel from Pasifika youth show Fresh begins with a series of pieces to camera gone wrong: sibling presenters Nainz and Viiz Tupai (Adeaze) get the giggles introducing 'Fresh Games', Laughing Samoan Tofiga Fepulea'i gets his man breasts ready for action, and Pani and Pani get lyrical about raisins. 'Fob Outs' (outtakes set to Outkast’s 'Hey Ya') include Scribe missing a beat, All Black Jerome Kaino getting tongue-tied, choreographer Parris Goebel pulling faces, actors Robbie Magasiva and David Fane mugging for the camera, and Nicole Whippy getting funky.

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The Miss New Zealand Show 1984

Television, 1984 (Full Length)

The early 80s were the apex of the local beauty pageant — Lorraine Downes won Miss Universe in 1983, and more Kiwis watched the 1981 Miss New Zealand contest on TV than Charles and Di’s wedding. This 1984 Miss World New Zealand live telecast was legendary for host Peter Sinclair announcing the wrong winner (clip six). Miss Auckland Barbara McDowell’s runner up sash is swiftly swapped for a crown and she is (eventually) made the first part-Samoan Miss NZ. A retro delight is the beauties dancing to Cyndi Lauper’s ‘Girls Just Want to Have Fun’ in an Oamaru quarry.

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Strassman Unplugged - Bloopers

Television, 2000 (Excerpts)

American-born ventriloquist David Strassman was the star of a self-titled show on TV2. These blooper clips from the Strassman Unplugged special see him and his puppets Chuck Wood, Ted E Bare and Sid Beaverman mocking each other as they get their lines wrong. However this isn't just a collection of missed lines — Chuck Wood goes heavy on the expletives to the studio audience and Ted E Bare has a bit of trouble wrangling his props. The show was made for TVNZ; Strassman has also appeared on television in Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States. 

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Mai Time - Bloopers 1998

Television, 1998 (Excerpts)

This bloopers reel comes from a 1998 episode of the pioneering series for rangatahi, which explored te ao Māori (the Māori world) and pop culture. Named 'Mai Stakes', the outtakes montage includes presenters Stacey Daniels Morrison, Teremoana Rapley, Kimo Winiata, Bennett Pomana and Jared Pitman. Daniels Morrison nails her reo, but takes her wig off with her hoodie; and Pitman struggles to get his lines out. The soundtrack is The Jacksons 'Blame It on The Boogie', but the presenters have no one but themselves to blame for these bloopers! 

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That's Fairly Interesting - Series One, Episode 13

Television, 1987 (Full Length Episode)

This wryly-titled show was a homegrown take on US show That's Incredible!, with the spectacular stunts and supernatural happenings of the original replaced with more downbeat kiwiana kitsch subjects. It was the first series from production company Communicado. Presenters included mayor Tim Shadbolt, Neil Roberts, future Green-MP Sue Kedgley and rugby writer Phil Gifford. This highlights and bloopers episode from the first series, includes crayfish hypnotism, obese cats, a wind-turbine powered catamaran, dancing cows, and Gifford as a Gorillagram.

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The South Tonight - 1975 Final Episode

Television, 1975 (Full Length Episode)

Former presenter Derek Payne returns to front the finale of this first (NZBC) run of the Otago-Southland local news show. A report on strippers aside, the emphasis in this ‘best of’ series cull is on (often Pythonesque) humour. Highlights include Kevin Ramshaw’s Sam Spade-style private eye hunting Noddy, Payne walking a famous imaginary dog, a search for news in Invercargill and a reporters’ bloopers reel. An era when newsroom staff were learning their medium in the public eye is evoked, and the opening weather report is a glorious look back at TV’s lo-tech past.

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Wildtrack - Otago Harbour

Television, 1990 (Full Length Episode)

Wildtrack was a highly successful nature series for children, running from 1981 through several series to the early 90s. The series was produced from Natural History New Zealand’s (then TVNZ’s Natural History Unit) Dunedin base and this final episode for 1990 looks at the natural world of the Otago Peninsula and harbour, from unique inhabitants: royal albatross, fur seals, and yellow-eyed penguin; to myth-busting explanations of the pot of gold at the end of a rainbow, lichen, and mudflat cricket. It includes the year’s bloopers reel.

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Good Morning - Final Episode

Television, 2015 (Full Length Episode)

On 11 December 2015 the morning telly watching nation mourned the end of a long-running TV One staple. Good Morning’s 9000 hours spanned nearly two decades, from faxes to Facebook. In this final episode, presenters Jeanette Thomas, Matai Smith and Astar wrangle a two-hour curtain call of ex-hosts. Included are the last Men’s Panel, cooking bloopers, and of course, advertorials (with a Suzanne Paul tribute, and a promo for Stiffy fabric stiffener). There’s tautoko to the show’s te reo, support for the arts, and disaster appeals, and Shortland Street's Will Hall lip synchs to Def Leppard.

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The Ray Woolf Show - Christmas Special

Television, 1979 (Full Length Episode)

In 1979 entertainer Ray Woolf went from co-hosting Two for One to his own chat show. This wide-ranging 'best of' episode from the end of the first season takes in bloopers, the victims of the Amityville Horror, Doctor Who Jon Pertwee,  Gomer Pyle Jim Nabors, Norman Gunston, Alan Whicker, Frankie Howerd, Derek Nimmo, Diana Dors, Austin Mitchell, poet Pam Ayres, humorist Erma Bombeck and singer Billy Daniels — plus Kiwis Ricky May, Ian Fraser (on piano), Tina Cross, Selwyn Toogood and Precious McKenzie. Woolf, was judged 1979 TV Light Entertainer of the year.