Kids Classics

In this collection we pack our lunch boxes and shine the light on a collection of classic pre school, after school and Saturday shows. These programmes were on hand for generations of Kiwis when they were doing (or meant to be doing) homework or chores. Viewers of a certain age will recognise many of the shows (from Play School to Nice One Stu) and presenters (Stu, Jason, Shavaughn, etc). Ka kite, and remember: “Keep cool  ’till ...”.


What Now? - 30th Birthday Show

Television, 2011 (Full Length Episode)

NZ telly's longest running children's show turns 30 with a two hour, live extravaganza — far removed from its modest beginnings as a half hour pre-record in 1981. Current hosts Charlie, Johnson and Gem are joined by a parade of past presenters who reminisce, and compete to find the show's best decade. Masterchef finalist Jax Hamilton provides snacks, celebrities send greetings; and — in amongst the cupcakes, gunge, fart jokes and mayhem — the programme enters its fourth decade as an institution, watched by the children of its original audience.

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After School - Māorimind (Episode)

Television, 1981 (Full Length Episode)

Host of weekday kids' programme After School, Olly Ohlson, was the first Māori presenter to anchor his own children's show, and his catchphrase (with accompanying sign language) "Keep cool till after school" is remembered by a generation of Kiwi kids. The show also broke ground in its use of te reo Māori on screen. This episode sees a game of Maorimind (a te reo test based on Mastermind) and the building of a road-sign for the longest place name in New Zealand - a 85-letter te reo gobstopper that Olly rolls out with aplomb: Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateatu... etc. 


Play School - Presenter Compilation

Television, 1980–1987 (Excerpts)

Play School (1972 - 1990) was an iconic educational show for pre-school children. The opening sequence — "Here's a house ..." — and the toys (Big Ted, Little Ted, Jemima, Humpty, Manu) were the stars. This compilation reel of various presenters features two excerpts from 1980: Barry Dorking and Jacqui Hay (future National MP), and Dorking solo; one from 1982: actor Rawiri (Whale Rider) Paratene with Winsome Dacker; and two from 1987: Eilish Wahren with Kerry McCammon, and Russell (Count Homgenized) Smith and actress Theresa (Shortland St) Healey.

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Here's Andy

Television, 1975–1976 (Excerpts)

Teen presenter Andrew Shaw arrived on Kiwi television screens in the mid 70s, in a children's slot which began as TV2 Presents Andy, but was soon retitled Here's Andy. Shaw acted as a host, linking the afternoon's programming live to air, so little was recorded for posterity. This selection of opening sequences includes animated scenes of dancing animals, and images of Andy clowning around, or dressed up as muscleman and spaceman. There are also shots of him taking a Kenworth for a spin, and visiting MOTAT. The high speed final reel was used on follow-up show Hey Hey It's Andy. 


The Son of a Gunn Show - Christmas Special

Television, 1992 (Full Length Episode)

Jason Gunn and sidekick Thingee present a Christmas Day special as only they can. Guests include Wonder Dogs host Mark Leishman, singers Debbie Harwood and Kim Willoughby and All Black Va’aiga “Inga the Winger” Tuigamala. The fate of Christmas dinner hangs in the balance as guests and audience members take part in competitions that include an unfortunate way to make eggnog. Some bizarre presents are exchanged and there’s a cameo for Gunn's Mum. Jason also manages a Paul Holmes impression (along with some Frank Spencer and a dash of Rik Mayall).


Nice One - Christmas Show

Television, 1978 (Full Length Episode)

Stu Dennison hosted TV One's children's show Nice One from 1976 to 1978, making the catch phrase "Nice one, Stu" a part of NZ TV legend. This 1978 Christmas show, and final ever Nice One programme, branched out from the show's usual after-school interstitials length to a half-hour special featuring series regulars such as singer/songwriter Steve Allen, and chef Alison Holst (look out for her son and now business partner Simon as a young boy, in their Christmas cooking segment). Stu's corduroy flares and waistcoat ensemble is a 70s delight to behold. 


You and Me - Toilet Training

Television, 1993 (Full Length Episode)

In this episode of her series for pre-schoolers, Suzy Cato goes where few television programmes have gone before and devotes an episode to toilet training. Food and its digestion, what happens in the bathroom and the importance of hand washing are all covered — with the more practical aspects demonstrated using Terence Teddy. Suzy mixes her customary warmth and friendliness with a no-nonsense approach and it's all done in the best possible taste. Light relief is provided by a film insert about a family making the traditional Tongan fruit drink 'otai.   


3:45 LIVE! - Interview Compilation

Television, 1990 (Excerpts)

3:45 LIVE! was an afternoon links programme for kids that screened on TV2. Before he became world-famous as host of Amazing Race, Phil Keoghan was a presenter on the show in tandem with Hine Elder. In excerpts here, the pair interview Martin Phillipps of The Chills; expat singer Mark Williams; and the cast of Badjelly and the Witch. International stars on the couch include Dave Stewart (of the Eurythmics), and rap singer Redhead Kingpin, who is off-the-wall. Phil and Hine also take off Judy Bailey and Richard Long before interviewing the newsreaders themselves. 


The Early Bird Show - Excerpts

Television, 1991 (Excerpts)

Russell Rooster and Suzy Cato bid viewers “doodle-doo” in this TV3 children’s show which combines local skits, interviews and competitions with overseas cartoons. In this August 1991 compilation, “Bugman” Ruud Kleinpaste talks about cockroaches (with serious specimens) and Billy T James is remembered with an excerpt from an appearance on the show. In-house artist Mark shows viewers how to draw 'monstas' and there are time-honoured jokes from Kiri Kea and various ducklings. Mercifully, Suzy protects Russell from the fact she is giving away fried chicken vouchers.


Chic Chat - 1981 Episode

Television, 1981 (Full Length Episode)

Chic Littlewood’s afterschool show for children featured skits performed by Chic and his puppets to link cartoons and other overseas programming. Chic should be in control — but the real star here is the somewhat wayward Willie McNabb (from a Scottish family of mice courtesy of Auckland theatre doyenne Alma Woods). Chic and Willie are never quite on the same wavelength — and Chic’s Gramps character has even less chance of matching wits with him. Mother McNabb appears briefly — while the apparently ogre-like producer is an ominous but unseen presence.

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Nice One - comedy excerpts

Television, 1978 (Excerpts)

This collection of clips from afternoon children's slot Nice One starts with a silent movie-style scene accompanied by the title song as host Stu Dennison larks about Lower Hutt on roller skates, crashes his chopper cycle, and gives his famous thumbs up. Next come a series of jokes, most of them involving Stu facing off in a classroom against a disapproving teacher. For three years in the mid 1970s, the bearded, slightly naughty schoolboy was one of the most beloved characters on local television.  


Tracy '80 - Episode

Television, 1980 (Full Length Episode)

This episode of TV2’s 1980 weekly after-school show features performances by resident band Kairo (covering the Doobie Brothers) and the Montgomery Sisters. In the field, Tracy Barr joins naval frigate HMNZS Waikato sailing from Devonport Naval Base, under the Auckland Harbour Bridge and up the Waitemata Harbour to collect ammunition at Point Kauri, and then out to sea for gunnery practice. On board, Tracy chats to the captain, a chef and a laundryman (who irons 150 shirts every day) — the results of the exercise seem to be a military secret.


The Son of a Gunn Show - Thingee's Eye Pop

Television, 1994 (Full Length)

The moment Thingee's eye popped out has become a legendary event in Kiwi television history, as an unflappable Jason Gunn continues hosting duties, despite his co-presenter being in a spot of bother. The ocular incident occurred during filming of The Son of a Gunn Show. Although some swear they saw it happen live, the moment did not go to air until weeks after the event — on a nighttime bloopers show. Thingee debuted on After School and appeared in several children's shows, including What Now?. He retired from New Zealand television after returning to his home planet.