Raised in Taranaki with seven siblings and roughly as many books, Anthony McCarten went on to co-write global stage hit Ladies Night. In 1998 he made his first movie as a director, based on his play Via Satellite. McCarten's next film Show of Hands involved an endurance contest. In 2015 he won two BAFTA awards for Stephen Hawking biopic The Theory of Everything. Winston Churchill drama Darkest Hour followed.    

The reason McCarten’s work adapts so well to the big screen is that he is a natural-born screenwriter. His novels feature strong plots and superb dialogue. John McCrystal, in an 18 February 2012 Listener review of Anthony McCarten's novel In the Absence of Heroes
Title.jpg.118x104

Bohemian Rhapsody

2018, Writer - Film

Title.jpg.118x104

Darkest Hour

2017, Writer, Producer - Film

Title.jpg.118x104

The Theory of Everything

2014, Writer, Producer - Film

Title.jpg.118x104

Death of a Superhero

2011, Original Author, Writer, Executive Producer - Film

Show of hands key image.jpg.540x405

Show of Hands

2008, Writer, Director, Original Author - Film

The second feature film directed by writer Anthony McCarten (Ladies' Night) is a small tale with some big themes. Set in a New Plymouth car yard, the film chronicles an endurance contest in which a car will be awarded to the person who manages to keep their hands on it the longest. As night falls, solo mother Jess (Melanie Lynskey) finds herself fending off the attentions of an obstinate competitor (Craig Hall), with a much harsher vision of the world than hers. Inspired by similar real-life contests, McCarten based the film on his novel Endurance.

Title.jpg.118x104

The English Harem

2005, Writer, Original Author - Television

2414.thumb.png.540x405

Via Satellite

1998, Director, Original Author, Writer - Film

The first movie written and directed by playwright Anthony McCarten is a portrait of a family melting down under the media spotlight. The comedy/drama stars Danielle Cormack in two roles — as a swimmer on the cusp of Olympic glory, and as the twin sister back home, looking on as her family descends into spats and bickering as they find the pressure to perform too much to bear. Via Satellite showcases a topline cast, including Tim Balme, Rima Te Wiata, and a scene-stealing and heavily-pregnant Jodie Dorday, who won an NZ TV and Film Award for her work.

Title.jpg.118x104

Fluff

1995, Director, Writer - Short Film

4689.thumb.png.540x405

The Model

1994, Script Editor - Short Film

This short explores subtle tensions in a relationship between an artist and his model. To the young beauty who has arrived to model nude, the aging painter (played by the director Jonathan Brough’s father) initially appears decent and respectful. But when she demands to see the painting before he is ready, and he refuses, his intentions are questioned. Based on a short story by American Bernard Malamud, this understated two-hander was invited to play at Cannes, in a special 1994 season of Kiwi shorts. It was Hawera-raised Brough’s second (self-funded) short.

10813.thumb.png.540x405

The Edge

1994, Subject - Television

The Edge was an early edition in a series of magazine style arts shows made by the Gibson Group. Later shows included Sunday, Bookenz, Bill Ralston-hosted Backch@t, and Frontseat. Diverging from then-standard Kaleidoscope model (sometimes lengthy documentaries, often on single subjects) The Edge took a faster-paced approach, with multiple pieces in a half hour show. Subjects ranged from the birth of special effects company Weta to early landscape painter Alfred Sharpe. Fronted by writer Mary McCallum, two series and over 60 episodes of the show were produced. 

Title.jpg.118x104

Nocturne in a Room

1992, Director, Writer - Short Film

Title.jpg.118x104

Rodney and Juliet

1990, Writer - Short Film

Title.jpg.118x104

Pumpernickel

1987, Writer - Short Film

Title.jpg.118x104

Worzel Gummidge Down Under

1987, Writer - Television